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BUS 120 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (2.00 credits)
Conducting business embraces many disciplines. This course will explore several areas such as marketing, management, and entrepreneurship and how they all work together when engaging in socially responsible commerce. Anyone interested in how business activities are carried out should take this course. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 150 1 IT'S YOUR BUSINESS! (4.00 credits)
Leadership is action, not a position. Be better prepared for ethical leadership by applying concepts of business, economics, organizational behavior, and entrepreneurship to your life plan. Using the framework of business principles, paint a picture of yourself and the organizations of which you are a part. Business concepts such as management and marketing have exciting universal insights that can be employed to uncover your own vision, mission statement, core values, and distinctive advantage. Skills in planning organizing, leadership building teams, communication, motivation, branding, and differentiation are both personally and professionally valuable. Know your value, define your place, and be prepared to change the world. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 210 BUSINESS ECONOMICS (3.00 credits)
This course is for students interested in minoring in Business. The course will discuss the key topics of macro and micro economics and finance in the context of meaningful social and business situations. Topics include supply and demand, forms of market structure, and elements of gross domestic product, the role of monetary and fiscal policy, security markets and security market instruments. (F)
BUS 220 TOPICS IN BUSINESS (2.00 credits)
This course is for students interested in minoring in business. The course will discuss key topics of macro and micro economics and finance in the context of meaningful social and business situations. Topics include supply and demand, forms of market structure, and elements of gross domestic product, the role of monetary and fiscal policy, security markets and security market instruments. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 279 INDEPENDENT STUDY - BUSINESS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics and credits arranged. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
BUS 280 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3.00 credits)
This course explores the role of financial accounting in measuring and communicating business activities to external users primarily through financial statements. Information is measured through the application of the double entry system of accounting to financial transactions that impacts a company’s resources and claims to those resources. Fundamental principles of financial accounting are explored as they relate to accounting systems, internal control, asset, liability and equity accounts. This course also includes an introduction to the Intuit QuickBooks small business accounting software. (F/S)
BUS 281 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3.00 credits)
This course defines the role of management accounting in producing information that is relevant in a fast-paced, competitive environment for internal decision makers within business organizations. Alternative methods for the computation of costs for products and services will be explored including job order costing, process costing, activity-based costing and standard costing. The behavior of costs will be analyzed using cost-volume-profit analysis. Cost information will be utilized for budgetary planning and controlling, capital investment decisions, pricing, variance analysis and decision making activities in organizations. This course also completes the financial topics of BUS 280 through an in-depth analysis of the cash flow statement and a comprehensive review of the financial statements. (F/S) Prerequisites: BUS 280, MATH 122.
BUS 297 BUSINESS CORE I - BRIDGE (1.00 - 2.00 credits)
This is a self-study course for students who need to do supplemental work for the Business core curriculum. Students will complete work under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisites: BUS 298 and instructor authorizatrion.
BUS 298 INTEGRATED BUS SEMESTER 1 - PART A (3.00 credits)
Students explore foundational business concepts across diciplines (accounting, finance, marketing, management) to develop a holistic (systems) prespective of organizations. Particular attention is paid to accounting principles, including use of quickbooks and its connection to other business functions
BUS 299 INTEGRATED BUS SEMESTER 1 - PART B (3.00 credits)
Students continue exploring business concepts across disciplines, engaging in mutliple learning experiences, including an intense, multi week, online business simulation. Students are challenged to to analyze connections among key business decisions (strategy, pricing/promotion, production, financing, etc.)
BUS 301 MARKETING PRINCIPLES (3.00 credits)
This is an introductory course to survey the principles of marketing. Concepts relating to product, price, promotion, and distribution as well as of the sources of marketing information will be studied. Prerequisites: Course can be taken concurrently with ECON 255, but not before. (F/S)
BUS 302 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3.00 credits)
This course examines human behavior in work organizations, as well as effective means to manage that behavior in a way that contributes to both organizational effective and human satisfaction. Topics include team development, communication, leadership, motivation, problem solving, and ethical decision making.
BUS 303 CORPORATE FINANCE (3.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to the financial management of firms and investments. Topics include: Forms of business, taxes, cash flows, financial analysis of firms, the financial system, business planning, Corporate Governance, interest-rate theory, time-value-of-money, valuation & characteristics of financial securities, and financial risk & return. Prerequisites: Successful completion of pre-business courses and MATH 222. (F/S)
BUS 304 U BUSINESS LAW I (3.00 credits)
This course introduces students to the court system, the legal process, contract formulation and performance, remedies, agency relationships, sales, product liability, and the Uniform Commercial Code. Provide students with (1) an understanding of how the law affects business operations, (2) an understanding of the principle of "stare devises" and the ability to apply the rule of precedent to case studies, (3) skills to use current technology in completing a legal research project involving a current ethical issue, and (4) a thorough understanding of basic contract law principles. Prerequisites: Successful completion of pre-business courses. (F/S)
BUS 305 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3.00 credits)
Operations in an industrial or service enterprise must work as a system to be efficient and competitive. Students will learn how operations management topics such as inventory management, project management, forecasting, capacity planning, scheduling, facility design and quality are interrelated. Quantitative methods are taught as the basis for decision making and process improvement. Spreadsheet analysis and process simulation are integral components of the course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of pre-business courses and MATH 222. (F/S)
BUS 306 KX BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (4.00 credits)
This course focuses on written and oral communication in a business environment. In both individual and group settings students will plan, write, and deliver routine, goodwill, persuasive, and bad-news messages. They will complete business reports and proposals, plan and give oral presentations, write resumes and cover letters and engage in the interview process. The students will better understand the business communication environment and processes communicate more effectively in teams, master listening and non-verbal communication and be able to communicate inter-culturally. Prerequisites: Successful completion of pre-business courses, BUS 301, and BUS 302. (F/S)
BUS 307 VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE I (1.00 credits)
The first of a two-semester, academic and experiential series, BUS 307 introduces students to different types of tax systems while presenting diverse perspectives on what makes up a fair and just tax system. This course will explore how culture plays a role in the development of tax systems both in the US and internationally. We will also discuss how government uses taxes to influence behavior and promote social goals. During this 8-week session, you will also complete the Department of Revenue certification required to volunteer at the IRS sponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites during the spring semester. VITA provides free tax service to clients in need, generally low-income, handicapped and/or the elderly. Prerequisites:  COR 1 or equivalent open to second and third year students or sophomore and above transfers. (F)
BUS 308 2 VOL INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE II (2.00 - 3.00 credits)
Course includes participation in IRS sponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program giving students an opportunity to provide free tax service to clients in need, generally low-income, handicapped and/or the elderly. The course will challenge the student to develop a philosophy on what constitutes a just and compassionate tax system and to understand what the social goals are for a tax system. 50 volunteer hours through VITA is required spring semester for 2 credits; 100 volunteer hours through VITA is required for 3 credits. Prerequisite:  BUS 307. (S)
BUS 340 MANAGEMENT OF ORGANIZATIONS (3.00 credits)
The course is a scholarly and practical exploration of the complex concept of managing in organizations and is built on the foundational principle that management is a process. Through readings, assignments, class projects and discussion, the course will help prepare students for management roles by developing abilities that are necessary to be effective in a variety of managerial settings. Students will have the opportunity for personal development through self-assessment exercises and practical experiences. Topics include change, innovation, ethics, strategy, planning, organizational structures, organizational culture, decision making, negotiation and control processes. Prerequisites: Successful completion of pre-business courses, BUS 399 and BUS 448 (F)
BUS 347 BUSINESS CORE II - BRIDGE (1.00 - 2.00 credits)
This is a self-study course for students who need to do supplemental work to be appropriately prepared for the Business Core II course series (BUS 348/349). Students will complete work under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisites: BUS 298, 299, and instructor authorization. (F/S)
BUS 348 INTEGRATED BUS SEMESTER 2 - PART A (3.00 credits)
Students explore a key social issues and examine how stakeholder organizations orperate using different business frames of reference: accounting, finance, management and marketing. Students conduct stakeholder interviews, engage in a debate, analyze case studies, and develop organizational reports.
BUS 349 KX INTEGRATED BUS SEMESTER 2 - PART B (3.00 credits)
Students continue exploring a key social issue and work in teams to develop creative solutions that community stakeholders could implement. Students conduct research, write multiple individual and team based papers and make presentations to stakeholders, using key business communication tools.
BUS 379 INDEPENDENT STUDY - BUSINESS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics and credits arranged. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
BUS 380 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3.00 credits)
An in-depth study of the theoretical foundations of financial accounting and reporting at the intermediate level. Topics include the accounting conceptual framework, the accounting information system, advanced financial statement preparation (balance sheet, income statement, statement of stockholders’ equity and statement of cash flows), footnote disclosures, time value of money concepts, accounting for cash, receivables, inventories, property, plant, and equipment, and intangible assets. The course includes an introduction to Sage Peachtree accounting software. Application of topics through written case analyses and through research in the FASB Accounting Standards Codification is required. Prerequisites: Successful completion of pre-business courses and BUS 281 or concurrent registration. (F/S)
BUS 381 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3.00 credits)
A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. Topics covered include accounting for current and non-current liabilities, contingencies and equity accounts; accounting for leases, investments, income taxes and pensions; dilutive securities and earnings per share; accounting changes, disclosure in financial reporting and revenue recognition. Application of topics through written case analysis is required. Prerequisite: BUS 380. (F/S)
BUS 385 COST ACCOUNTING (3.00 credits)
In addition to providing data used to cost products and services, cost accounting provides data to managers for planning and controlling. Today cost accountants are increasingly expected to actively contribute in the making of strategic decisions instead of simply providing data. Cost accounting is a managerial tool used by business to formulate strategy and its implementation. The course’s focus is upon how accounting information can assist managers in controlling the activities for which they are responsible, and how manager’s use cost information to make better decisions to improve their organization’s competitiveness. The course covers the fundamentals of cost accounting, including job order, process, and activity based costing. Particular emphasis is given to current practices in cost control through reports to management. Prerequisites: Successful completion of pre-business courses and BUS 281. (F)
BUS 397 BUSINESS CORE II - BRIDGE (1.00 - 2.00 credits)
This is a self-study course for students who need to do supplemental work to be appropriately prepared for the Business Core III course series (Bus 398;399). Students will complete work under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisites: BUS 348, BUS 349, Consent of the inststructor. (F/S)
BUS 398 INTEGRATED BUS SEMESTER 3 - PART A (3.00 credits)
Students examine how corporations operate for multiple disciplinary perspectives, conducting research to develop comprehensive company reports. They explore career paths and the critical role of functional experts in product design and implementation, meeting with corporate partners on campus and at company sites.
BUS 399 INTEGRATED BUS SEMESTER 3 - PART B (3.00 credits)
An introduction to the financial management of firms and investments. Topics include: forms of a business, agency problem, personal and corporate taxes, cash flows versus accounting money flows, financial analysis using financial statement, business and financial planning, corporate governance, interest-rate theories, review of time-value-of-money, capital budgeting techniques, valuation and characteristics of financial securities (bonds, stocks & options), and financial risk & return. Prerequisites: ECON 240, MATH 122, MATH 121, BUS 298, BUS 299, BUS 348 & BUS 349.
BUS 411 INTERMEDIATE CORPORATE FINANCE (3.00 credits)
This course is a continuation of BUS 303 Corporate Finance. Topics include: Capital Budgeting, Long-Term Financing, Working Capital Management, Corporate Restructuring, and International Finance.  Prerequisites: BUS 398, 399 (including its prerequisites). (S)
BUS 412 INVESTMENTS (3.00 credits)
The purpose of this course is to explore the tools used for investment analysis. Topics covered include stock and bond valuation, fundamental and technical analysis, risk and return models, portfolio theory and structure, the pricing of derivatives such as options and futures, portfolio hedging, market timing strategies, and investment performance evaluation. Prerequisites: BUS 411, 398, 399 (F)
BUS 414 MONEY, BANKING & CAPITAL MARKETS (4.00 credits)
This course covers the evolution of money, the development of banking institutions, the theory and implementation of monetary policy, and recent developments in international monetary affairs. A final section focuses on international banking, the Eurocurrency market and the international monetary system. May be cross-listed with ECON 460 and/or BUS 772. Prerequisite: Successful completion of pre-business courses. (F of alternate years)
BUS 415 FINANCIAL PLANNING (4.00 credits)
Designed for those considering a career in personal financial planning, or those desiring to take more control of their own personal finances. Topics include 1) Time value of money 2) Financial statements and budgets 3) Managing income taxes 4) Managing risk; insurance and basics 5) Investment fundementals (stocks, bonds, mutual funds, ETF's) 6) Personal planning 7) Estate Planning and 8) Personal plan of action
BUS 419 PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING (3.00 credits)
Financial Planning: Designed fot those considering a career in personal financial planning or those desiring to take personal control over their retirement planning. You will develop a personal financial plan which can serve as a road map to your retirement. Pre-Requisites: Integrated Program Semester 3
BUS 430 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3.00 credits)
This course will provide an overview of strategic human resource management (HRM). HRM is a fundamental component of the competitiveness, effectiveness, and sustainability of any organization, as it influences who is hired, how they are trained, evaluated, and compensated, and what steps are taken to retain them. Throughout the course we will focus on the role of managers and how they can develop and implement effective and efficient human resource practices that support the strategic objectives of their firms. Increasingly, the task of managing and developing people is shared between human resources and general managers. Learners actively examine HRM within a larger context of the organization’s strategic direction, as well as the external and legal environment. Prerequisites: BUS 348 and 349 or concurrent registration.
BUS 431 MARKETING STRATEGY (3.00 credits)
This course focuses on strategic marketing decisions using case studies and covering current topics in marketing management. Prerequisites: BUS 301. (F)
BUS 432 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3.00 credits)
Analysis of how consumers process information, form attitudes, and make decisions, and how consumer behavior is affected by cultural factors and interpersonal influences. Prerequisites: BUS 301.
BUS 433 ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION STRATEGY (3.00 credits)
This course covers the elements of the promotional mix, including the communication process, creative advertising strategies, media and planning strategies, direct marketing and interactive media, sales promotion strategies, the role of personal selling in sales promotions, measuring advertising and promotional effectiveness, and social, ethical and regulatory issues in advertising and promotion strategy. Prerequisites: BUS 301. (S)
BUS 434 MARKET RESEARCH (3.00 credits)
This course includes qualitative and quantitative research methods, with an emphasis on quantitative survey-based research applications.   Prerequisites: BUS 301. (F)
BUS 435 PROFESSIONAL SELLING AND SALES MGMT (3.00 credits)
The steps of the relationship selling process, including the creation of effective sales presentations, analysis and use of state-of-the-art sales methods and negotiating techniques, use of technology in prospecting and selling, exploring careers in professional selling, ethical issues in sales, as well as effective hiring, training, and managing of salespeople. Prerequisites: BUS 301. (F)
BUS 440 IMPROVING ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVEN (3.00 credits)
To be competitive in a global economy, organizations need a process for continuous improvement and effective planning. The primary purpose of this course is to study and improve an organization from the viewpoint of a system. The primary topics include organization viewed as a system, systems thinking, organizational learning, systems and processes improvement, understanding and managing variation and improvement methodologies. Topics include: strategies for continuous improvement, leadership and organization for continuous improvement, application of statistical process control methods, small group improvement, PDCA Cycle for improvement model and customer and supplier involvement. Prerequisites: BUS 448 and BUS 449.
BUS 448 INTEGRATED BUS SEMESTER 4 - PART A (3.00 credits)
This is the first of a two-course series. Students enrolled in BUS 448 MUST also be enrolled in BUS 449. Operations in an industrial or service enterprise must work as a system to be effective and competitive. The primary purpose of this course is to study the interrelated operations of an enterprise as a system. Students will learn how operations management topics such as process, capacity, inventory management, project management, forecasting, scheduling and quality are interrelated. Quantitative methods for decision making, model building, methods and techniques of operations common to business systems and process simulation are taught as the foundations of the course. Prerequisites: BUS 398, BUS 399.
BUS 449 G INTEGRATED BUS SEMESTER 4 - PART B (3.00 credits)
The aim of the course is to enable students to better analyze and understand the opportunities and challenges that companies face when expanding their activities internationally. It is designed to give students a thorough understanding of global business issues and practices including the economic, political, technological, and legal environment faced by global organizations, the ways in which culture can facilitate or hinder organizational success; approaches and options for developing effective strategies for international organizations; trade pacts and issues that provide opportunities or create barriers to a company’s international expansion; the influence of global monetary institutions and currency rates and options for global, multi-domestic and transnational product and branding strategies. Readings, case studies, and worksheets are used to aid students’ learning. In addition, students will participate in a computer simulation in which they practice applying business decisions in a global business environment. Prerequisites: Successful completion BUS 398 and BUS 399 (F, S)
BUS 455 ORG SUSTAINABILITY AND INNOVATION (3.00 credits)
This course explores the fundamental concepts of and relationships between organizational stability and innovation. We will examine problems resulting from ecologically unsustainable organizational behaviors and explore innovative organizational best practices that address these problems. Prerequisites: Junior standing.
BUS 462 PRINCIPLES OF LEADERSHIP (3.00 credits)
This course will prepare students for leadership roles in their professional and personal lives. While the course cannot teach students to become leaders, it will provide a theoretical and practical foundation that students can use to develop and improve their leadership abilities necessary to be effective in a variety of settings. Students will also have the opportunity for personal development through self-assessment exercises and practical experiences. Topics include leadership theories, power and influence, change, diversity, innovation, conflict and negotiation. . Prerequisites: BUS 302 and 340
BUS 465 3U SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN BUSINESS (3.00 credits)
This COR 3 interdisciplinary course explores and implements the critical thinking, communication, and managerial skills necessary for developing ethical organizations and an ethical society. First, students examine "Who am I" by writing weekly journal entries about ethical dilemmas experienced at work and compose a purpose of life essay associated with your professional goals. Second, students develop a better understanding of "the needs and opportunities of the world" through a service-learning project that improves social well-being. Third, explore their "role in building a just and compassionate world" by learning how to create and manage an ethical organization and enhance their ethical decision-making skills. Prerequisites: COR 2 course, senior standing.
BUS 475 BUSINESS INTERNSHIP (3.00 - 9.00 credits)
This course provides an opportunity for the business student to intern in a professional business organization and to develop an understanding of the practice of business. The practicum will be supervised by the Business Internship Director working with a mentoring member of the organization interning the student. The student, the BID, and the interning organization's mentor will develop a printed contract with stated learning objectives, means of performance evaluation, and expected time commitments. The student is expected to successfully complete all required expectations of the business organization as well as the expectations of the BID. Students must also attend the appreciation/internship dinner in Fall or the accounting club dinner in Spring.  Credits are granted by the number of hours required. Prerequisites: Senior standing as a business major, BUS 306 and consent of academic advisor. (F/S/SS) 3 credits = 160 (minimum) to 240 hours 4 credits = 241-321 hours 5 credits = 233-401 hours 6 credits = 402-482 hours 7 credits = 483-562 hours 8 credits = 563-643 hours 9 credits = 644-723 hours
BUS 476 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP (3.00 - 9.00 credits)
This course requires an intern to perform entry-level accounting work, including general ledger accounting, adjusting entries, assisting in the preparation of financial statements, internal auditing of accounting functions, income tax preparation, independent auditing, cost accounting and budgeting/forecasting. 40 hours of work is equivalent to one credit hour. A maximum of 9 credits can be taken for this course. Prerequisites: BUS 380 and approval of instructor. (S)
BUS 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - BUSINESS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics and credits arranged. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
BUS 481 AUDITING (3.00 credits)
Principles of auditing and the audit process. The course describes the foundation for the role of the independent auditor in the global economy, professional standards, planning the audit and designing audit programs, audit working papers, auditing specific financial statement categories, auditors reports and professional ethics. Prerequisites: BUS 381 or concurrent registration. BUS 483 strongly recommended. (S)
BUS 483 ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS (3.00 credits)
This course covers current information technology. Topics include accounting information systems, flow charts, internal controls, advanced spreadsheets and database techniques, information system selection, and developing business requirements. Prerequisite: BUS 381 or concurrent registration. (F)
BUS 485 INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING I (3.00 credits)
Tax laws and regulations related to individual taxpayers and the principles of taxation common to all taxpayers (i.e. Individuals, partnerships and corporations). Prerequisite: BUS 281. (F)
BUS 486 TOPICS IN MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3.00 credits)
Various topics on Managerial and Cost Accounting. Topics may include, but are not limited to 1) Financial Decision making; 2) Financial Planning, Performance and Control; or other topics of current interest. Prerequisite: BUS 385/705.
BUS 492A INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOUR A- CHINA (1.00 credits)
Each year, the School of Business offers students the opportunity to participate in a short-term international travel experience to different countries through two sequential courses (BUS 492A and 492B G). Through the courses, students gain critical insights and valuable real-world experience of global business processes and practices. In BUS 492A, students learn about various aspects of a country’s culture and society, history, cultural values/customs, and social and economic development and the impact of these issues on business practices. Books, readings and videos will be assigned for students to read/watch with class discussion focused on comparing and understanding differences in these topic areas between the US and the focus country. Students must enroll in both BUS 492A and 492B G in order to receive the G-tag.
BUS 492B G INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOUR B- CHINA (2.00 credits)
Each year, the School of Business offers students the opportunity to participate in a short-term international travel experience to different countries through two sequential courses (BUS 492A and 492B G). Through the courses, students gain critical insights and valuable real-world experience of global business processes and practices. In BUS 492B G, students will participate in an approximately 10-day trip to the focus country as well as attend classes in the fall semester. During the trip, student tour locally- and foreign-owned companies, meet business executives to discuss business challenges and opportunities in the country, attend lectures about the country's economy and culture, and participate in guided tours of historical and cultural sites. In the fall semester, students will meet 1 - 2 hours weekly to further explore business practices in the focus country within an historical, cultural and social context. In addition, students will analyze and compare the business practices in the US and focus country. Students must enroll in both BUS 492A and 492B G in order to receive the G-tag.
BUS 494A INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOUR A- GERMANY (1.00 credits)
Each year, the School of Business offers students the opportunity to participate in a short-term international travel experience to different countries through two sequential courses (BUS 494A and 494B G). Through the courses, students gain critical insights and valuable real-world experience of global business processes and practices. In BUS 494A, students learn about various aspects of a country’s culture and society, history, cultural values/customs, and social and economic development and the impact of these issues on business practices. Books, readings and videos will be assigned for students to read/watch with class discussion focused on comparing and understanding differences in these topic areas between the US and the focus country. Students must enroll in both BUS 494A and 494B G in order to receive the G-tag.
BUS 494B G INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOUR B- GERMANY (2.00 credits)
Each year, the School of Business offers students the opportunity to participate in a short-term international travel experience to different countries through two sequential courses (BUS 494A and 494B G). Through the courses, students gain critical insights and valuable real-world experience of global business processes and practices. In BUS 494B G, students will participate in an approximately 10-day trip to the focus country as well as attend classes in the fall semester. During the trip, student tour locally- and foreign-owned companies, meet business executives to discuss business challenges and opportunities in the country, attend lectures about the country's economy and culture, and participate in guided tours of historical and cultural sites. In the fall semester, students will meet 1 - 2 hours weekly to further explore business practices in the focus country within an historical, cultural and social context. In addition, students will analyze and compare the business practices in the US and focus country. Students must enroll in both BUS 494A and 494B G in order to receive the G-tag.
BUS 495 INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING II (3.00 credits)
Tax laws and regulations for partnerships and corporations; tax administration and research. Prerequisite: BUS 485. (S)
BUS 499 3U BUSINESS CAPSTONE (7.00 credits)
This interdisciplinary capstone course provides students with the opportunity to integrate multiple components of their business education and to practice the critical thinking, communication, managerial and entrepreneurial skills necessary for developing sustainable ethical organizations. Students examine who they are through reflections about their personal experiences and their personal and professional goals. Students also develop a better understanding of the needs and opportunities of the world through a service-learning project. Students study, integrate, and apply key business concepts in the creation of a comprehensive business plan for a sustainable, ethical organization that meets consumer needs. Students will participate in field trips, hear from guest speakers, and be coached and mentored by business professionals and faculty to enhance their learning and personal development. At the end of the course, students will present their business plans to the Edgewood community. Prerequisites: COR 2, business major, second-semester senior standing. (F/S)
BUS 500 ALGEBRA REVIEW (3.00 credits)
This course provides the graduate business student with those essentials of college algebra and trigonometry required for the MBA program. The successful completion of this course satisfies the prerequisite requirement for both BUS 501 and BUS 502. Prerequisites: a previous course in algebra
BUS 500A MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN BUS PART A (1.50 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the common mathematical tools used in business applications. The mathematical theory will be developed at a deep enough level to enable students to understand and solve real-world problems, but no mathematics will be introduced that does not have ready application. While these applications are the focus of the course, students will also learn about some of the connections between mathematics and other disciplines and larger societal issues involving mathematics. Prerequisites: placement examination or transferred college-level math course.
BUS 500B MATHEMATICAL MODELS IN BUS PART B (1.50 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the common mathematical tools used in business applications. The mathematical theory will be developed at a deep enough level to enable students to understand and solve real-world problems, but no mathematics will be introduced that does not have ready application. While these applications are the focus of the course, students will also learn about some of the connections between mathematics and other disciplines and larger societal issues involving mathematics. Prerequisites: BUS 500A
BUS 501 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING FOR GRAD STDNT (3.00 credits)
This course explores the role of financial accounting in measuring and communicating business activities to external users primarily through financial statements. Information is measured through the application of the double entry system of accounting to financial transactions that impacts a company’s resources and claims to those resources. Fundamental principles of financial accounting are explored as they relate to accounting systems, internal control, asset, liability and equity accounts. This course also includes an introduction to the time value of money concepts and to the Intuit QuickBooks small business accounting software. (F/S/SS)
BUS 502 BUSINESS CALCULUS (3.00 credits)
Business Calculus improves problem-identification, problem-formulation and problem-solving skills. It's useful in coursework and business practice. Calculus topics include: limits; derivatives; rules for differentiation; integration; rules for integration; and partial derivatives. Topics are developed in the context of business applications. Prerequisite: BUS 500 or proficiency in Pre-Calculus Algebra.
BUS 503 INTRODUCTORY BUSINESS STATISTICS (3.00 credits)
This course serves to acquaint business students with fundamental statistical ideas and techniques that will be useful throughout their MBA program as well as their business careers. Topics include geometric data displays, summary statistics, normal distribution, t- distribution, binomial distribution, confidence and prediction intervals, hypothesis testing, and use of Excel software. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 503A INTRO BUS STATISTICS PART ONE (1.50 credits)
An introduction to the statistical tools commonly used in professional disciplines. Theory will be explored at a level deep enough to make concepts accessible, but all of the serious computation will be done by computer. Prerequisites: Placement exam or college level math course.
BUS 503B INTRO BUS STATISTICS PART II (1.50 credits)
An introduction to the statistical tools commonly used in professional disciplines. Theory will be explored at a level deep enough to make concepts accessible, but all of the serious computation will be done by computer. Prerequisites: BUS 503A. (Graduate students must complete Part I and II of BUS 503 to receive full credit for Business Statistics).
BUS 504 LEGAL ENVIRONMENTS (3.00 credits)
An overview of the role and methodology of the legal environment within which business must operate. Topics will include a) the essential elements of a contract including mutual assent, consideration, legality, capacity and compliance with the statute of frauds; b) other introductory legal concepts of agency, bailments, sales under the uniform commercial code, negligence and product liability; and c) property law including Wisconsin's Marital Property Law. In addition, the student will use current technology in completing a legal research project involving the operation of our legal system in the context of its relationship to a current social and ethical issue. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 505 MACRO-ECONOMICS FOR GRAD STUDENTS (3.00 credits)
Economics is concerned with the efficient utilization or management of limited productive resources for the purpose of attaining the maximum satisfaction of human material wants. Macro-economic looks at an overview of the economy and the relationships among the many aggregates that can be measured and compared over time. Organizational planning should take place only after studying the macro- economic environment. Prerequisites: BUS 500 or equivalent
BUS 506 MICRO-ECONOMICS FOR GRAD STUDENTS (3.00 credits)
Micro-economics is concerned with specific economic units and makes a detailed appraisal of these units’ economic functions. The purpose of studying micro- economics is to more intelligently make decisions. Strategic planning should only take place after there is a thorough understanding of the organizations micro- economic design. Prerequisites: BUS 500 or equivalent
BUS 517 APPLIED BUSINESS MATH (3.00 credits)
This 8-week course provides an overview of fundamental mathematics and statistics concepts to students who are seeking the Graduate Certificate and other program certification or degrees but have not had graduate level mathematics, statistics, and operations management courses. This pass/fail course will prepare such students to meet the mathematics and statistics prerequisites for BUS 604 and 605. Students will also have an option to test out of this course. No credits will be awarded towards the MBA Concentration or Graduate Certificate requirements for this course. The course will cover key concepts in algebra, basic calculus and statistics as they are applicable to solving common business problems. (SS)
BUS 598 GRADUATE STUDENT ORIENTATION (0.00 credits)
In the tradition of Edgewood College this course introduces newly enrolled students to the essentials of engaging in a learning community balanced in contemplation, study, and active service. The course explores Edgewood values in the classroom, best practices for educational success and basics of Blackboard. Course is only offered on-line. (F/W/S/SS)
BUS 601 EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
This course will survey key managerial communication perspectives and prepare the student to utilize technical, verbal, nonverbal and social-media tools to bring out the best in people. This course will prepare the student to research and understand the central theories of organizational communication, become fluent in communication concepts and their application and address each of the organizational design components that inform and influence communication (introduction, structure, strategy, people, rewards and processes).  Topics include an introduction to organizational communication, structure, strategy, people and processes.
BUS 602 ACCOUNTING FOR MANAGERS (3.00 credits)
This graduate level course is designed to provide insight into managerial accounting concepts with a focus on real-world application. Specifically, this course will examine managerial accounting tools and resources that assist managers with business decisions spanning different disciplines, including human resources, marketing, finance and operations. Standard costing, budgeting and forecasting methodologies will be examined. Financial statements will be analyzed by examining key ratios and trends. Sustainability reporting, which is becoming increasingly more important for businesses today, will also be covered. An entrepreneurial perspective will be provided throughout different aspects of the course, including an entrepreneurship case study. This course is challenging, fast paced and relevant for business managers or those making or supporting business decisions. Prerequisite: BUS 501 (F/S)
BUS 603 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT/BEHAVIOR (3.00 credits)
Organizational Development and Behavior is the study of both the human behavior in an organizational setting and the operations related to organizational design and development. The purpose of this kind of study is to equip organizational leaders with the insight necessary to develop interpersonal relationships that will build teams, increase productivity, enhance the quality of work life, orchestrate change, improve employee retention, and augment communication. Topics in management including: Perception, Personality and Attitudes, Group Process: Building Teams, Communication, Orchestrating Change, Motivation, Empowerment, Leadership, Organizational Development, Quality Assurance, Performance Appraisals and Business Ethics.
BUS 604 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3.00 credits)
This course is a study of concepts and techniques relating to operations functions in both manufacturing and service organizations. The primary purpose of this course is to establish operations as a competitive advantage, study operation components of an enterprise as a system, and learn methods to optimize operation processes and resources: people, material, capacity, information, and technology. Quantitative methods of analysis are used to support decision-making in the various operations management activities. Process analysis, capacity planning, queueing models, quality concepts, project managements and process simulation are taught as the foundations of the course. Prerequisites: BUS 605
BUS 605 STATISTICS FOR MANAGERS (3.00 credits)
This course is an intermediate-level business statistics course. Topics include the application of One-Way ANOVA, Simple Linear Regression, and Multiple Linear Regression and Time-Series models to business applications. Students are required to be proficient in EXCEL, which will be used for statistical applications. Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus Algebra and first Semester Statistics.
BUS 606 STRATEGIC MARKETING (3.00 credits)
This is a course that intends to integrate marketing knowledge and apply it in addressing strategic decision making situations. Strongly emphasizing application, the course is centered around the process of analyzing cases in marketing management with the express purpose of making clear, specific, and justifiable strategic marketing decisions. This course emphasizes the use of analytical skills in making judgments under uncertainty in a variety of marketing contexts, including strategic selling, sales management, new product introduction, franchising, marketing research, and others. It is intended to help students apply critical thinking skills in making better decisions using strategic criteria. Prerequisites: BUS 601
BUS 607 CORPORATE FINANCE (3.00 credits)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the world of corporate finance. Topics covered will include financial statement analysis, cost of capital, capital structure, common stock valuation, capital budgeting, market efficiency, dividend policy, mergers and acquisitions, corporate hedging, and corporate restructuring and failure. Prerequisites: completion of all Foundation Courses and BUS 602.
BUS 609A MBA STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT I (2.00 credits)
Students will develop an understanding of strategy and its formulation, implementation, and evaluation. The course focuses on strategic management decisions and actively incorporates multi-disciplinary elements of marketing, finance, operations, and quantitative analysis. It is designed to help students learn how to identify, dissect, and answer strategic management problems; research, analyze, and offer solutions to crucial challenges facing organizations; and present fact-based analysis and recommendations in oral and written formats to persuade an audience to support recommendations. The course utilizes readings, business cases and real-life examples to accomplish the synthesis. BUS 609A and BUS 609B must be taken in consecutive terms. Prerequisite: All MBA Core Courses.
BUS 609B MBA STATEGIC MANAGEMENT II (2.00 credits)
A continuation of BUS 609A, in which students will deepen their ability and skills in answering strategy management problems, offer solutions to challenges facing organizations, and further hone their oral and written skills through presenting fact-based analysis and recommendations to persuade an audience to support recommendations. Additional readings, business cases and real-life examples will be utilized to accomplish the synthesis. BUS 609A and BUS 609B must be taken in consecutive terms. Prerequisite: All MBA Core Courses.
BUS 610 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3.00 credits)
An examination of the role of economic analysis in managerial decision-making. A study of demand, cost, pricing, and risk theories will be major topics. Firm and industry analyses will provide the student with the opportunity to apply these concepts to real world situations. Prerequisites: BUS 601-607 (concurrent enrollment in no more than one is allowed: to be taken in the last 12 credits.
BUS 611 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3.00 credits)
An advanced seminar designed to examine the following: international trade theory and foreign capital flows; foreign exchange markets and international finance; international monetary systems and macro- economic adjustment mechanisms; and the international finance functions of multi- national corporations. (S) Prerequisites: BUS 601 through 607 (concurrent enrollment in no more than one is allowed). To be taken in last 12 credits of program.
BUS 614 ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS (3.00 credits)
This course examines the techniques used to study and analyze organizations as holistic entities comprised of interdependent component parts. The course explores the manner in which organizational analyses are positioned, designed, implemented, and evaluated. Various data gathering methods are explored relative to critical organizational variables such as strategy/mission, goals/objectives, measurement, communication, group boundaries, power and status, relationships, rewards, orperations/processes, structure, design, employee learning and growth, and customer satisfaction. Utilizing the data from an organizational analysis to guide and target subsequent planning, leadership development, and team development initiatives is emphasized. (F/S)
BUS 616 BUSINESS ETHICS (3.00 credits)
This interdisciplinary course explores and implements the critical thinking and managerial and ethical decision-making skills necessary for developing ethical organizations and an ethical society.  The objective of this course is to design ethical organizations and create organizations of high integrity. Students explore real-life ethical dilemmas and benchmark their organization’s performance with the best practices in business ethics.   Prerequisites: None.
BUS 618 MANAGING INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY (3.00 credits)
This course is designed to assist students in learning the fundamental importance of information systems in contemporary organizations. Using a variety of case studies, students examine the major information systems theories, concepts and techniques within the context of organizational and managerial considerations involved in designing, developing, implementing and using information systems. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 631 INTRO TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3.00 credits)
This course explores market-based economic development strategies aimed at creating significant and sustainable value in urban and rural communities. It examines successful economic development models and a wide range of funding sources to support development initiatives. Students take on the perspective of an Economic Development decision maker as they apply business skills to address community and economic development challenges and opportunities. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 632 MARKETING FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3.00 credits)
This course examines the competitive marketplace in which urban and rural regions must operate to develop and grow as well as the critical role marketing plays in growth of communities. Students learn the latest marketing tools and research techniques, including leveraging the internet. They gain valuable experience in critiquing, developing, and implementing effective marketing strategies for economic development initiatives. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 633 FINANCE FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3.00 credits)
This course compares the role of business entrepreneurs and social entrepreneurs in creating sustainable businesses in urban and rural communities within an economy characterized by increasing competition from corporations, dwindling resources, and workforce challenges. Students develop solutions to expand existing businesses and develop new ones. They will weigh decisions about attracting capital, business location, sustainability, and community fit. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 634 LEADERSHIP FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (3.00 credits)
This course provides an understanding of key leadership and people skills necessary to drive economic development initiatives as an effective change agent. This includes strategies on networking; identifying key community and opinion leaders; building linkages between business, nonprofit, and public institutions; handling conflict and competing interests; and practicing grass-root strategies to involve the poor in economic development initiatives. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 639A CAPSTONE: ECON DEVELOPMENT INTRNSHP (3.00 credits)
The Internship Capstone integrates functional knowledge with a strategic management perspective. Interns assume roles as Social Entrepreneurs and Economic Development professionals to work on a well-defined real-world initiative in an urban or rural economic development organization or business. Up to four students may be assigned to an internship site to enable communities to benefit from a team approach. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 639B CAPSTONE: ECON DEV BUSINESS PROJECT (3.00 credits)
The Business Project Capstone integrates functional knowledge with a strategic management perspective. Students assume roles as Social Entrepreneurs and Economic Development professionals to complete a development project, major paper, or business plan allowing a community or agency where the student is currently involved to launch an economic development initiative, address a specific community challenge, or sustainably improve social conditions. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 679 BUSINESS INTERNSHIP (3.00 - 6.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
BUS 703 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3.00 credits)
An in-depth study of the theoretical foundations of financial accounting and reporting at the intermediate level. Topics include the accounting conceptual framework, the accounting information system, advanced financial statement preparation (balance sheet, income statement, statement of stockholders’ equity and statement of cash flows), footnote disclosures, time value of money concepts, accounting for cash, receivables, inventories, property, plant, and equipment, and intangible assets. International accounting convergence topics are introduced. The course includes an introduction to Sage Peachtree accounting software. Application of topics through written case analyses and through research in the FASB Accounting Standards Codification is required. Prerequisite: BUS 602 or equivalent. (F/S)
BUS 704 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3.00 credits)
A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. Topics covered include accounting for current and non-current liabilities, contingencies and equity accounts; accounting for leases, investments, income taxes and pensions; dilutive securities and earnings per share; accounting changes, disclosure in financial reporting and revenue recognition. International accounting convergence topics are introduced. Application of topics through written case analysis is required. Prerequisite: 703 (F/S)
BUS 705 COST ACCOUNTING I (3.00 credits)
In addition to providing data used to cost products and services, cost accounting provides data to managers for planning and controlling. Today cost accountants are increasingly expected to actively contribute in the making of strategic decisions instead of simply providing data. Cost accounting is a managerial tool used by business to formulate strategy and its implementation. The course’s focus is upon how accounting information can assist managers in controlling the activities for which they are responsible, and how manager’s use cost information to make better decisions to improve their organization’s competitiveness. The course covers the fundamentals of cost accounting, including job order, process, and activity based costing. Particular emphasis is given to current practices in cost control through reports to management. Prerequisite: BUS 602 or equivalent. (F)
BUS 706 AUDITING (3.00 credits)
Principles of auditing and the audit process. The course describes the foundation for the role of the independent auditor in the global economy, professional standards, planning the audit and designing audit programs, audit working papers, auditing specific financial statement categories, auditors’ reports and professional ethics. Prerequisites: BUS 704 or concurrent registration. BUS 725 strongly recommended. (S)
BUS 707 INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING I (3.00 credits)
Tax laws and regulations relating to individual taxpayers and the principles of taxation common to all taxpayers (i.e., individuals, partnerships and corporations). Prerequisite: BUS 602 or equivalent. (F)
BUS 709 INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING II (3.00 credits)
Tax laws and regulations for partnerships and corporations; tax administration and research. Prerequisite: BUS 707 (S)
BUS 711 TOPICS IN CORPORATE FINANCE (3.00 credits)
Topics include capital budgeting, valuation of projects and firms, dividend policy, capital structure, cost of capital, mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisites: BUS 607
BUS 712 INVESTMENTS (3.00 credits)
Stocks, bonds, derivatives, portfolio theory, and other aspects of investment theory are considered as time permits. Prerequisites: BUS 607
BUS 713 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3.00 credits)
Relates the principles of business finance to the operations of international firms. Topics include the international financial environment, international credit institutions, capital markets and trends in international monetary affairs, management of foreign exchange positions and hedging strategies, international capital budgeting and working capital management. Prerequisites: BUS 607
BUS 714 ADVANCED COST MANAGEMENT & CONTROL (3.00 credits)
An advanced course in cost and managerial accounting from a strategic decision-making perspective. Topics include strategy considerations, operational planning, performance and quality controls, variance analysis in accounting information, inventory management and social responsibility. This course also includes an introduction to project management. Prerequisite: BUS 705 (S)
BUS 716 PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3.00 credits)
This class will examine topics relating to security analysis, portfolio construction, management and protection. These topics include diversification, risk, fundamental analysis, technical analysis, psychology, active versus passive, equity and fixed-income portfolios, hedging, futures, forwards, options, swaps, CDS's, alternative investments, portfolio performance measures and evaluation. Parts of this course will be modeled in conjunction with the curriculum of the CFA level 1 exam. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. (F)
BUS 717 VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE I (1.00 credits)
The first of a two-semester academic and experiential series, this course introduces students to different types of tax systems while presenting diverse perspectives on what makes up a fair and just tax system. We will explore how culture plays a role in the development of tax systems both in the US and internationally. We will also discuss how government uses taxes to influence behavior and promote social goals. During this 8 week session, students will complete the Department of Revenue certification required to volunteer at the IRS sponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites during the Spring semester. VITA provides free tax service to clients in need, generally low-income, handicapped, and/or the elderly. Cross-listed with BUS 307. (F)
BUS 718 VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE II (2.00 - 3.00 credits)
This course includes participation in the IRS sponsored Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, giving students an opportunity to provide free tax service to clients in need, generally low-income, handicapped, and/or the elderly. The course will challenge the student to develop a philosophy on what constitutes a just and compassionate tax system and to understand what the social goals are for a tax system. 50 volunteer hours through VITA are required to earn 2 credits; 100 volunteer hours through VITA are required to earn 3 credits. Cross-listed with BUS 308. Prerequisite: BUS 717. (S)
BUS 719 PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING (3.00 credits)
Financial Planning: Designed for those considering a career in personal financial planning or those desiring to take personal control over their retirement planning. You will develop a personal financial plan which can serve as a road-map to your retirement.ONLINE ONLY Prerequisites: BUS 607 or consent of instructor
BUS 721 LEGAL ASPECTS OF EMPLOYMENT (3.00 credits)
This course focuses on the current body of municipal, state and federal anti- discrimination laws which regulate the employment relationship and provides an overview of the post-Civil War social, economic and legal repression of African- Americans, which occurred after the collapse of Reconstruction, along with a description Civil Rights Movement which culminated with the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Topics include the Americans with Disables Act, Family & Medical Leave Act, Sexual Harassment and Sex Discrimination, Religious Discrimination, Age Discrimination, Employee Contracts, Drug and Alcohol Testing, Wrongful Discharge, and Employee References. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 723 BUSINESS LAW II (3.00 credits)
Commercial paper, real property, secured transactions, bankruptcy, partnerships, corporations, wills and trusts. Case study approach. Prerequisites: BUS 320 or BUS 504
BUS 725 ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS (3.00 credits)
Understanding current information technology. Topics include accounting information system, flow charting, internal control, advanced spreadsheets and database techniques, information system selection, and developing business requirements. Prerequisite: BUS 704 (F)
BUS 726 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING I (3.00 credits)
A study of advanced accounting topics including business combinations, equity method of accounting for investments, consolidated financial statements, various intercompany transactions, multinational accounting, foreign currency transactions, and translation of foreign financial statements. This course is challenging, fast paced and current with the rapidly changing environment of financial reporting, especially as it relates to convergence with international accounting standards. Prerequisite: BUS 704 (F/S)
BUS 727 GOVERNMENTAL & NOT-FOR-PROFIT ACCTG (3.00 credits)
A study of advanced accounting topics including accounting for governments and not-for-profit organizations.  Topics include the analysis of organizational structure, strategy decision-making and reporting.  Practical application includes governmental CAFRs and not-for-profit financial and tax compliance reporting. Prerequisite: BUS 704 (F/S)
BUS 730 HEALTHCARE MARKETING (3.00 credits)
This course provides students with the tools to understand patients' needs, resist competitive pressures, build referral networks, expand market share, recruit and retain top-notch staff in a highly competitive labor market, and more. This course will apply fundamental marketing principles to the growing and dynamic field of healthcare, and give students practical tools they can use in improving any healthcare organization, anticipating future challenges, and engaging in ethical, effective healthcare marketing practices. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 732 DEVELOPING SELF-DIRECTED WORK TEAMS (3.00 credits)
As American organizations move toward the use of self-directed work teams to improve work processes, special emphasis needs to be placed on the knowledge and skills associated with small group processes and leadership. This course, conducted in an experiential format, emphasizes application to real-life situations faced by managers. Prerequisites: BUS 603
BUS 736 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3.00 credits)
A study of the functional activities of a human resource department, including recruiting selection, development, evaluation, compensation and an overview of related regulatory impacts. Prerequisites: BUS 603
BUS 738 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3.00 credits)
An Entrepreneur is someone who creates business by assuming risk and marshaling the resources necessary to take an identified opportunity through a strategic plan into implementation, growth, and succession. Topics include identifying and assessing opportunities, strategic planning, forms of ownership, building a powerful marketing plan, managing cash flow, identifying sources of funding and leading a growth enterprise. Prerequisites: BUS 604, 606, & 607.
BUS 739 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT (3.00 credits)
The primary goal of this course is to cultivate an understanding of management in a multicultural environment. Topics will be chosen from: understanding the effect of geography and economics on culture; effective communication, conflict management and leadership in an international arena; ethical, legal, political and social awareness; managing multinational operations; organizational design for an international environment. Prerequisites: BUS 603
BUS 751 MARKETING RESEARCH (3.00 credits)
This course covers the process of designing and implementing the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data used to make marketing decisions. A mix of theory and application, the course focuses on conducting quantitative survey research to assess facts, attitudes, and behaviors. Prerequisites: BUS 605, 606.
BUS 752 ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION STRATEGY (3.00 credits)
This course examines integrated marketing communications as related to elements of promotion, public relations, publicity, advertising and personal selling. Prerequisites: BUS 606
BUS 753 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3.00 credits)
This course includes the study of product planning, pricing, distribution, and promotion for marketing to foreign markets. Prerequisites: BUS 606
BUS 754 GRAD SEMINAR IN MARKETING MANAGEMNT (3.00 credits)
Through simulation, the course develops the skills expected of the marketing manager. Product decisions, pricing, promotional plans, and distribution systems are studied. Prerequisites: BUS 605, BUS 606
BUS 755 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3.00 credits)
A course on consumer psychology examining how consumers process information, form attitudes, and make decisions on how to behave. Social influences, global issues, and ethical considerations are all covered, and qualitative methods of studying consumer behavior are applied in order to acquire a more in-depth understanding of "what makes people tick" as consumers. Prerequisites: BUS 606
BUS 756 FRAUD & FORENSIC ACCOUNTING (3.00 credits)
Detecting and deterring occupational fraud are key elements of an organization’s risk management plan.  Topics included in this course include the impact of fraud on auditing and financial reporting, the recognition of weaknesses in business processes and control systems, the measures organizations can take to prevent fraud, and the ways allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved. Prerequisite: BUS 706 or approval by instructor (F/S)
BUS 757 PM1 FOUNDATIONS (3.00 credits)
This course provides the tools to understand project lifecycle, project task planning, resource estimation, cost-benefit analysis, project scheduling, control, and communication. The content of this course will be aligned with the PMBOK (Project Management Book of Knowledge, published by the Project Management Institute). This course will give students practical tools they can use in understanding, planning and executing projects. (S)
BUS 758 PM2 ADVANCED CONCEPTS (3.00 credits)
This course will build on the foundational concepts learned in Project Management, and will be aligned with PMBOK. The student will learn how to establish and manage project steering committees, how to identify and manage organizational change management issues, how to identify and manage project risks, and how to perform quality assurance. Prerequisites: BUS 757 or consent of the instructor. (S)
BUS 759 PM3 PRACTICUM OR INDEP PROJECT (3.00 credits)
This course is designed to be an independent study, and will offer the student an opportunity to apply concepts learned in Project Management 1 and 2, in real-life projects. Students will collaborate with faculty to identify a project their employer or another organization is currently undertaking, and apply concepts learned in the program to that project. Prerequisite: BUS 758. (SS)
BUS 761 QUALITY IMPROVEMENT METHODS (3.00 credits)
The primary purpose of this course is to present knowledge about variation as the basis of management decision making. The principles of Shewhart quality control charts are the main approach in understanding and managing variation. The quote by Dr. Lloyd Nelson clearly states the aim of this course that “The central problem of management in all its aspects, including planning, procurement, manufacturing, research, sales, personnel, accounting, and law, is to understand better the meaning of variation, and to extract information contained in variation.” To bridge classroom learning with practical experience, students will complete and improvement project during the semester. Prerequisites: BUS 503 or equivalent.
BUS 762 QUALITY AS A BUSINESS STRATEGY (3.00 credits)
The primary purpose of this course is to establish quality as a business strategy. Particularly, the course will introduce the leadership competencies necessary to lead the organization as a system. Although broad-scale organizational change strategies, systematic approach to improvement models, methodologies to improve efficiency and quality will be addressed, the main focus of this course is to understand and manage the organization as a system. System view of the organization, the SIPOC Model (Supplier, Input, Process, Output, and Customer), interactions and interdependencies, motivational theories and fallacy of employee performance appraisals will be discussed in detail. Prerequisites: BUS 503 or equivalent.
BUS 763 UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING FRAUD (3.00 credits)
Virtually all organizations encounter fraud, but much of it goes undetected. An organization must be able to identify the risks and vulnerabilities to effectively manage them. This course looks at the ways to build a resistant organization and minimize the costs of fraud. Learn about managment's responsibilities for the integration of internal controls with fraud prevention. (F)
BUS 764 PM4 BUS REQUIREMENTS (3.00 credits)
This course will focus on specific methodologies, tools, and techniques for identifying the key business requirements for projects. Identifying the appropriate requirements at the appropriate level of detail has been recognized as one of the most significant contributors to project success. Prerequisite: BUS 758. (SS)
BUS 766 PM5 ANALYSIS DECISION TOOLS (3.00 credits)
This course provides analytical models, tools, and methodologies that help reach and support fact-based decisions related to project management. The course will draw on quantitative and qualitative methods of analysis. Prerequisite: BUS 758. (F)
BUS 767 PM6 PMI EXAM PREP (3.00 credits)
PMI conducts the exam for earning the coveted PMP (Project Management Professional) designation. The exam requires considerable preparation and this course, along with others in this Graduate Certificate, will help students prepare for that exam, Prerequisite: BUS 758. (SS)
BUS 768 BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES AND INTERVIEWNG (3.00 credits)
This course covers the social, psychological, and criminological perspectives of employee/employer dynamics and interactions, office culture, leadership, and detection of fraudulent, criminal or otherwise dishonest employee behaviors. This course will also explore criminological issues of importance in business such as white-collar crimes (including fraud and embezzlement). Active listening, being able to interpret body language and effectively asking the right questions in the optional environment aid an interviewer in detecting deception. (S)
BUS 769 TOOLS & TECHNIQUES OF DIGTL FORNSCS (3.00 credits)
The proliferation of technology makes putting the puzzle pieces together more challenging. Learning to gather and interpret the wealth of digital information can be invaluable to an organization for both prevention and detection of fraud. This course explores tools for conducting data analytics and other digital investigation techniques. (S)
BUS 772 MONEY AND BANKING (3.00 credits)
Main topics in this course are the evolution of money, development of banking institutions, and theory and implementation of monetary policy. Recent developments in international monetary affairs, including international banking, petro-dollars, and the Euro-currency market are studied. Prerequisites: completion of Foundation Courses
BUS 775 MANAGERIAL HEALTH ECONOMICS (3.00 credits)
This is a course in applied microeconomics. It is designed for students who already understand basic consumer and producer theory, and focuses on how health care markets differ from other markets. Because of asymmetric information, uncertainty, government involvement, and externalities, the economics of the health care sector and its players (patients, providers, insurers, employers, and government) requires a special analysis. The student will learn how to apply microeconomic tools to study the medical care system and analyze the economic aspects of health care policy implications. Prerequisites: Microeconomics
BUS 781 INTRO TO AMER BUSINESS & CULTURE (3.00 credits)
This course is an overview of concepts and principles of American business and culture for international students including forms of business organizations; US financial managerial and tax accounting; capital markets; banking marketing, management theory and ethics; individualism and multiculturalism; gender and sexuality issues, U.S. media. Prerequisites: BUS 500-506, 602, 603, 605.
BUS 782 MBA BUSINESS INTERNSHIP (3.00 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with at least 100 hours of supervised, professional experience in a US business. Students will have an opportunity to integrate and apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to actual work settings. Students will deepen their knowledge and understanding of a broad range of business practices. The internship will be supervised by a Business Department faculty member working closely with the mentor of the company where the student interns in order to provide an experience appropriate for the student. Prerequisites: None.
BUS 783 BU-EC CAPSTONE (3.00 credits)
This is a capstone course for students in the Beihua University-Edgewood College joint MBA program. The objective of the course is to synthesize the learning from coursework and internship experiences and describe how that learning will be applied to their work environment back in the PRC. Prerequisites: Final term in the MBA program.
BUS 784 HEALTHCARE FINANCE (3.00 credits)
Study of the financing, accounting and management of the US health care system. Regulations and reimbursement, accounting principles, analysis of financial statements, cost analysis, staffing, and budgeting are examined.
BUS 785 HEALTH POLICY AND LAW (3.00 credits)
This course offers a broad survey of legal and policy issues relevant to health care policy makers, administrators and other critical health care stakeholders (i.e., consumers and providers). It provides an overview of the national and state legal and regulatory structure and examines the common law, statutes, and regulations that affect hospitals, physicians, and other health care providers. It explores how health care regulation may help or hinder increasing access, reducing cost, and improving quality. The recently enacted health reform (The Affordable Care Act) and its promise, likely constraints and legal and policy ramifications will be an important discussion topic throughout the course. (F/S)
BUS 786 ERP IN HEALTH SYSTEMS (3.00 credits)
This course is about how healthcare organizations (e.g., hospitals, clinics) operate as systems of complex business processes and the relationship to the information systems that underlie effective and efficient operational outcomes. The E-health record systems will be presented as a tool for managing care and quality. The student will learn methods and tools critical to the smooth functioning of complex health care organizations. Students will apply the concepts to real-life case studies from their experience in learning how to analyze operational problems and develop successful optimal solutions. (F/S)
BUS 787 HEALTH SYSTEMS OPERATIONS (3.00 credits)
This course explores the complex business and operational challenges of health care organizations including hospital and clinic systems. Health systems encompass multiple functional subcomponents, and human, financial and technical resources are required to efficiently and effectively deliver quality products and services to customers. Students will learn how systems are organized and processes effectively planned, managed and improved to achieve organizational success. The course will also explore how the various sub-functions and processes (e.g., emergency care, pharmacy, lab radiology, nursing service, and foundational operations such as information technology) seamlessly interrelate to optimize care and service quality. (F/S)
BUS 788 HEALTH INSURANCE PRINCIPLES (3.00 credits)
This course examines the various private and governmental insurance programs that are common un the US, with attention to the emerging policies and requirements of the Affordable Care Act. Insurance revenue, including private and public policies is the primary revenue source for healthcare organizations. In addition, healthcare organizations purchase insurance for their employees, representing a significant overhead expenditure item. This course examines the various private and governmental insurance programs common in the U.S., with a special focus on Wisconsin policies and practices. Attention will be given to emerging policies and requirements of the Affordable Care Act and the effect it will have on various stakeholders including consumers, providers, insurance companies, regulators, government sponsored healthcare programs, and employers. The course is designed to provide a broad exposure to policy and operational issues that system leaders may encounter in managing a health care organization, so that they have practical knowledge to help identify issues and the ramifications of strategic decisions. The course is also designed to familiarize students with various health policy issues related to insurance for both patients and employees. (F/S)
BUS 789 SERVICE AND CLINICAL QUALITY (3.00 credits)
The course evaluates health service and clinical quality from a comprehensive system perspective utilizing analytic tools and contemporary case studies. Data analysis techniques including process flow, variation, and control charts will be studied. A data-based quality improvement project proposal is required.
BUS 790 INDEPENDENT PROJECT (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Each independent project involves choosing a topic, conducting research, developing conclusions or hypotheses, and presenting a paper. Goals and objectives are set individually with an instructor to allow exploration of areas of individual interest and to Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
BUS 792A INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOUR A- CHINA (1.00 credits)
Each year, the School of Business offers students the opportunity to participate in a short-term international travel experience to different countries through two sequential courses (BUS 792A and 792B). Through the courses, students gain critical insights and valuable real-world experience of global business processes and practices. In BUS 792A, students learn about various aspects of a country’s culture and society, history, cultural values/customs, and social and economic development and the impact of these issues on business practices. Books, readings and videos will be assigned for students to read/watch with class discussion focused on comparing and understanding differences in these topic areas between the US and the focus country. Prerequisites: Completion of two 600-level business courses.
BUS 792B INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOUR B- CHINA (2.00 credits)
Each year, the School of Business offers students the opportunity to participate in a short-term international travel experience to different countries through two sequential courses (BUS 792A and 792B). Through the courses, students gain critical insights and valuable real-world experience of global business processes and practices. In BUS 792B, students participate in an approximately 10-day trip to the focus country. During the trip, student tour locally- and foreign-owned companies, meet business executives to discuss business challenges and opportunities in the country, attend lectures about the country's economy and culture, and participate in guided tours of historical and cultural sites. After the trip, students will write a report in which they analyze and compare the business practices of companies in the US and the focus country. Prerequisites: Completion of two-600 level business courses and BUS 792A.
BUS 795A INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOUR A- GERMANY (1.00 credits)
Each year, the School of Business offers students the opportunity to participate in a short-term international travel experience to different countries through two sequential courses (BUS 795A and 795B). Through the courses, students gain critical insights and valuable real-world experience of global business processes and practices. In BUS 795A, students learn about various aspects of a country’s culture and society, history, cultural values/customs, and social and economic development and the impact of these issues on business practices. Books, readings and videos will be assigned for students to read/watch with class discussion focused on comparing and understanding differences in these topic areas between the US and the focus country. Prerequisites: Completion of two 600-level business courses.
BUS 795B INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOUR B- GERMANY (2.00 credits)
Each year, the School of Business offers students the opportunity to participate in a short-term international travel experience to different countries through two sequential courses (BUS 795A and 795B). Through the courses, students gain critical insights and valuable real-world experience of global business processes and practices. In BUS 795B, students participate in an approximately 10-day trip to the focus country. During the trip, student tour locally- and foreign-owned companies, meet business executives to discuss business challenges and opportunities in the country, attend lectures about the country's economy and culture, and participate in guided tours of historical and cultural sites. After the trip, students will write a report in which they analyze and compare the business practices of companies in the US and the focus country. Prerequisites: Completion of two-600 level business courses and BUS 795A.
BUS 796 HS STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3.00 credits)
This a capstone course that will tie together all of the prior academic requirements of the degree program.  It is essentially about systematically leading and managing complex organizational change. The focus will be on understanding the management of the broad, complex system of organizations that make up the "system" of care financing and delivery.  The student will learn how to effectively navigate through the system to achieve strategies and goals that most effectively deliver excellent and affordable care to patient-customers. The students will assimilate and apply all of their prior academic and experiential knowledge to achieve “mastery” on the path to becoming exceptional leaders.  Leaders from regional health systems will present various views to the class.
BUS 798 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING (3.00 credits)
This capstone course to the MS Accountancy program challenges students to think critically and strategically from the perspective of a chief financial officer. This course includes a cross-functional immersion experience into the competitive business environment through a Capsim business simulation. Students will demonstrate AICPA core competencies through a final electronic portfolio presentation. Topics include comprehensive business strategy, change management, finance application, ethical leadership and social responsibility. Prerequisites: All other requirements for MS-Accountancy degree (F/S)
BUS 799 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics and credits arranged. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.