Skip to content
 

COMMS225 ADVANCED APPLIED COMMUNICATION (2.00 - 3.00 credits)
A practicum course providing advanced guided experience in applied communication. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS332 ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION (3.00 credits)
Complex story production and editing of segments exploring ethical and journalistic issues in depth. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS219 APPLIED COMMUNICATION (2.00 - 3.00 credits)
A practicum course providing guided experience in applied communication. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS312 KU ARGUMENT AND CONTROVERSY (3.00 credits)
This study of argumentation and controversy is designed to cultivate concepts and abilities which are practically important to the use of reasoned discourse in public contexts which involve disagreement, doubt, and/or opposition. The course aims at developing competence in the conduct of arguments calling for policy decision both in isolation and within public contexts. It seeks to enhance a student's ability to analyze, criticize, produce, and report arguments. The course also explores functions of argumentation in democratic societies. Prerequisites: completion of the O tag or concurrent enrollment in an O tag course; completion of PHIL 101.
COMMS230 2K CIVIC ENGAGEMENT & THE COMMON GOOD (3.00 credits)
While serving as volunteers with a Madison-area social service organization, students will develop an understanding of the values implicit in organizations of this sort and their importance to the broader community. Through classroom work and volunteer activities, students will learn the essential role of communication in an organization's internal functioning and its relation to society at large. Among other activities, students will develop a significant public message (oral presentation, brochure, report, or web inclusion) related to some aspect of organizational communication. The volunteer time commitment will be 15 hours per student to be scheduled during the semester. Students will need to be available to spend at least 2 hours per visit. This time commitment does not include travel time between Edgewood and the organizational partner. Students may be assigned a variety of volunteer roles. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers; completion of the O tag or concurrent enrollment in an O tag course.
COMMS201 COMMUNICATION AND CIVILIZATION (3.00 credits)
Provides students with the history of the discipline and the importance of communication in the development of civilization. The class covers the contributions of rhetoric and communications theory from early Greek times to the present, and offers vital insight to past and future contributions of Communication Studies. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS450 COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
Required of Communication Studies majors. The Communication Studies Program will make efforts to locate internships for students; however, in cannot guarantee availability. Internship experience should be relevant to the student's area of emphasis and career goals. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS378 COMMUNICATION TEACHING PRACTICUM (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Students get hands-on experience in college-level teaching by working closely with a Communication Studies faculty member to assist in class preparation and instructional activities in a given course. Student must arrange practicum contract with supervising instructor. Prerequisites: Prior satisfactory completion of the course in which the student is serving as teaching assistant.
COMMS334 DOCUMENTARY VIDEO PRODUCTION (3.00 credits)
Basic documentary production styles and issues; how to conceptualize and create journalistically sound documentaries. Students will produce a 30 minute video documentary. Prerequisites: COMMS 332.
COMMS325 JKQ GENDER, CULTURE, AND COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
In this course we will examine how gender is communicated within cultural and institutional settings (how we come to know what it is to be a woman or a man), the multiple ways humans communicate within and across gender lines (how we express ourselves as gendered individuals and why we do it many different ways), and the relationship of the two. We will also look at how feminists' theories illuminate gender issues in communication. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS320 GROUP DISCUSSION & TEAM LEADERSHIP (3.00 credits)
Communication makes a difference in small groups. In this course students will examine leading theories and methodological approaches focused on the link between communication and group outcomes. Students will have the opportunity to apply these theories and methods to real-life groups. Students will cover such topics as group processes, functionalism, decision making, emotions, leadership, social identity and conflict. The objective is to learn not only how to be a more effective group member but also how to evaluate and improve group experience, achievement and interaction.
COMMS379 INDEPENDENT STUDY - COMM STUDIES (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Independent Study of selected topics in Communication Arts developed by the student with the approval and direction of the instructor. (Prerequisite: consent of instructor) Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
COMMS479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - COMM STUDIES (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Independent Study of selected topics in Communication Studies developed by the student with the approval and direction of the instructor. (Prerequisite: consent of instructor) Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
COMMS218A INTERCOLLEGE & ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES (1.00 - 2.00 credits)
Participation in one of the following intercollegiate speech events: debate, original oratory, extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation of poetry, prose, humorous drama, or serious drama. One to two credits per semester; may be repeated up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS218B INTERCOLLEGE & ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES (1.00 - 2.00 credits)
Participation in one of the following intercollegiate speech events: debate, original oratory, extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation of poetry, prose, humorous drama, or serious drama. One to two credits per semester; may be repeated up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS218C INTERCOLLEGE & ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES (1.00 credits)
(One credit per semester; may be repeated up to a maximum of four credits.) Participation in one of the following intercollegiate speech events: debate, original oratory, extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation of poetry, prose, humorous drama, or serious drama. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS218D INTERCOLLEGE & ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES (1.00 credits)
(One credit per semester, may be repeated up to a maximum of four credits.) Participation in one of the following intercollegiate speech events: debate, original oratory, extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation of poetry, prose, humorous drama, or serious drama. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS317 D INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
This course is the study of how individuals perceive and react to cultural rules, and how those perceptions and reactions affect the ways they communicate with one another. The general goals of the class are for students to develop understanding of the role that identity plays in intercultural communication, develop understanding of how cultural rules affect communication, learn how cultures differ from each other and how they come together and coexist, and develop competence in communicating with people of various cultures in the United States and beyond. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS240 INTRO TO INTERPERSONL COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
Examines the fundamental elements of interpersonal communication.  Students will explore strategies for listening effectively, resolving conflict constructively, and using respectful language to improve interpersonal communication and relationships.  The process of interpersonal communication is not as simple as it might first appear.  This course looks at how scholarship can inform everyday interaction and explores how research and theories can lead to more effective and satisfying relationships.
COMMS241 J INTRO TO ORGANIZATIONAL COMM (3.00 credits)
Explores the communication that originates from and within profit and non-profit organizations. A survey of concepts, theories, and research helps the student to apply communication knowledge to the professional environment and prepare for a successful career. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS100 O INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
This course will introduce students to concepts in interpersonal, organizational, public and mediated communication, and will focus primarily on developing applied communication competencies in the following areas: personal relationships, conflict management, careers, small groups, public presentations, basic media literacy and civic engagement. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS243 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA STUDIES (3.00 credits)
Explores the structure, history, functions, potentials, and impact of mass and mediated communication in the U.S., with a focus on how culture and mass media influence each other. (F/SS) Prerequisites: None.
COMMS280 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC RELATIONS (3.00 credits)
This course is an overview of the functions, practices, and applications of public relations in private industry and the public sector, both in the U.S and abroad. We will examine the nature and role of PR, its historical development, activities of PR professionals, the ethics of public relations, and professional development of those working in the field. (F)
COMMS329 BK INTRODUCTION TO RADIO BROADCASTING (3.00 credits)
This course looks at the impact of radio within U.S. culture and mass media. Students will complete several projects, both in groups and individually, to showcase their knowledge of radio history, genres, news writing, marketing, advertising, and radio production. Students will work on the fundamentals of writing and public speaking for radio. However, these skills are applicable to all areas of public communication. To increase confidence in writing and oral communication, we will work on writing and speaking skills with a focus on specific radio audiences. Students will acquire strategies for organizing, gathering and evaluating information; so, it is both accessible and appealing to an audience. This course concludes with a final project, a 30-minute radio program. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS220 LEADERSHIP & PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS (2.00 credits)
Students in this course study best practices for and get practical experience in conducting efficient and productive professional meetings. This course is useful for students who wish to understand and/or prepare to participate in corporate boards of directors, government, or professional and student associations. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS319 2 MASS COMM CMPGN: COMM 4 PUBLIC GOOD (3.00 credits)
This course asks students to investigate how communication campaigns can help improve the quality of life for diverse individuals and populations. Working in teams, students will develop the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to plan, design, and carry out a communication campaign for a real-world client, a nonprofit organization. The issue addressed in this campaign will depend on the needs of the nonprofit organization, but whatever the issue, students will carefully consider relevant aspects of diversity including culture, gender, socioeconomic status, and more. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers; background in mediated communication (possibly from COMMS 243, COMMS 260, or a graphic design course) is suggested but not required.
COMMS315 NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
This course explores theory, research and practical applications of nonverbal communication in interpersonal relationships. It examines various types of nonverbal communication, including kinesics, proxemics, vocalics, haptics, artifacts, and chonemics. It also considers how communicators and their environment influence nonverbal behaviors in relationships, as well as the use of nonverbal behaviors for specific purposes, such as managing one's image, expressing emotions, managing conversations, processing messages, deceiving, and influencing others. Prerequisite: COMMS 240. (S)
COMMS314 PERSUASION PROMOTION & ADVERTISING (3.00 credits)
This course investigates persuasive communication with a special focus on advertising and promotion. Students are introduced to theories of persuasion, integrated marketing communication tools,  and the practical application of persuasive communication methods.   Prerequisites: None.
COMMS290 K PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS (3.00 credits)
Students will develop an understanding of the communication skills and expectations involved in professional, organizational, and public life. Such expectations include the ability to devise effective and ethical communication messages that respond appropriately to informative, persuasive, crisis communication, interviewing, and ceremonial speaking situations. Prerequisites: Completion of the O tag.
COMMS311 QUALITATIVE COMMS RESEARCH METHODS (3.00 credits)
This course aims to help students gain an essential view of qualitative inquiry within communication contexts. This course entails the following specific objectives: to examine the theoretical traditions of qualitative methods in the field of communication; to understand various approaches to qualitative inquiry such as interviewing, focus groups, and ethnography; to critique written qualitative research in communication journals and identify ways to improve it; and to develop skills and techniques to design a qualitative research project, including collecting and analyzing qualitative data and writing up qualitative findings. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS313 QUANTITATIVE COMM RESEARCH METHODS (3.00 credits)
Provides students with tools to better understand quantitative social science and communication research.  The class covers the basics of scientific inquiry, choosing participants, making generalizations, developing instruments, and collecting/analyzing data for communication research.  Students will design and conduct a quantitative research project exploring a communication question of their choice using the online survey tool Qualtrics.  The research experience will emphasize information and technological literacy, which will include finding, evaluating and analyzing relevant information, understanding research ethics in the digital age, and using a variety of information sources and technological tools.
COMMS250 RELATIONAL COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
Examines the fundamental elements of interpersonal communication within the context of developing relationships.  This course explores the forces that bring people together, keep them together, and separate and divide them.  Whether with roommates, lovers, parents, or friends, we are constantly experiencing how communication behavior affects our relationships.  It is within the context of our relationships with others that abstract concepts like feedback, perception, and conflict resolution become increasingly relevant. Therefore, theories and concepts covered in this course are examined against the backdrop of students’ actual relationships.
COMMS440 3 SENIOR CAPSTONE (3.00 credits)
This course is meant to serve as a summary "capstone" experience that will help students integrate what they have learned in their college experience--in and out of the classroom--with their plans for the future. It helps students reflect upon and prepare to present their accomplishments, develop resumes/curriculum vitas, practice communication-theory-based interviewing skills, and explore avenues for locating career and graduate study opportunities as well as opportunities for developing a rich and fulfilling life outside the professional realm through civic engagement. The course also guides students in reflecting on Edgewood's COR questions in the context of their chosen field.
COMMS295 K SOC MEDIA: BRANDS, INFLUENCERS & HM (3.00 credits)
This course will help students understand how social media has changed the way we do business and explore the influence of social networks and personal connections. Learning will take place both in virtual and face-to-face environments. Students who complete this course will know how to create profiles, appropriately post, tweet, comment, chat and tag. Students will gain confidence in their participation in virtual communities and have hands-on experience with the latest social media platforms, developing the online communication skills that today's employers demand. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS430 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMM STUDIES (3.00 credits)
A variable topics seminar that treats specialized areas of communications study, e.g., health communications, communication, communication and the environment, persuasion, and marginalized communities. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS101 SPEECH (3.00 credits)
A fundamentals course that focuses on public speaking with some attention to group presentation. The course emphasizes communication theory and ethical practice as to how to organize an argument for effective persuasion and expression. The goal of the course is to help the students find their own voices in order to better use their public speaking skills. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS110 1 SPORTS TALK (3.00 credits)
This course examines how we talk about sports, and for what purposes. The sporting world provides us with opportunities to talk about issues of social importance that we might otherwise ignore. Recent controversies within the sporting world have inspired nationwide discussions about racism, sexism and gender equality, the exploitation of college athletes, corruption in college sports, labor issues, violence, health and safety issues, or the use of sport as propaganda. By examining the world of "sports talk" through a communcation perspective, students will understand how the sporting world functions as both a reflection of our social shortcomings and a site for social change. (F)
COMMS228 A TELEVISION CRITICISM (3.00 credits)
A survey class covering the history of broadcast, satellite and cable television with content analysis of program genres and media research on TV effects, including viewing violence, news and political coverage, advertising and effects of TV on children concerning violence and advertising. This class also covers public health issues, including obesity and its links to TV viewing. This class has a strong emphasis on media literacy and how this media industry works. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS430B TOPICS: AFRO-AMERICAN COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
This course explores African-American language, culture and communication with in-depth and reitical interpretations within a social and historical context. Crosslisted with ETHS 430B. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS430A TOPICS: HEALTH COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
COMMS430D TPC: UNSPINNING CAMPAIGN RHETORIC (3.00 credits)
Characteristic of political campaigns is the "spinning" of factual information. Campaigners employ a variety of techniques including bending "facts," mischaracterizing the words of others, and ignoring or denying crucial evidence to create support for their value and/or policy positions. Guided by previous communication research, students will identify important assertions of fact in the campaigns of state and local candidates in the 2010 elections and seek to verify such assertions by consulting relevant literature and experts. if the candidates' assertions are not supported, the candidates themselves will be asked for clarification. The study will be conducted within the context of general campaign communication and will pursue such questions as "What political realities encourage "spin?" "What is the ethical importance of veracity in political speech?" "What is the role of the media in perpetuating "spin" and/or "fact checking" assertions made in political campaigns?" Cross-listed with HI 404. Prerequisites: None.
COMMS430H VIDEO PRODUCTION BASICS (2.00 credits)
This course will teach students to use video cameras, shoot video footage well, learn interviewing skills, ethnographic field production video techniques, and basic editing on industry editing software. Cross-listed with ENG 316A. (W)
COMMS260 X WRITING FOR THE MEDIA (3.00 credits)
This course introduces students to writing in a professional environment and to the forms of writing for the mass media (including news and feature stories for print and broadcast, advertising copy, writing for the Web, and writing for public relations). The class is heavily practice-based, with the majority of the final grade coming from weekly writing assignments and in-class writing workshops. The main course objective is for students to leave the class able to write clearly, concisely, and appropriately for a variety of media settings. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone..