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ENVS 203 E DEBATING THE EARTH: POL PERS ON ENV (4.00 credits)
In the minds of many scientists and policymakers, there are ultimately is no issue of greater important than sorting out humankind's relationship to the deteriorating natural environment that sustains all life on earth. In this course, we shall explore how a diverse array of competing political perspectives views this relationship in terms of both the sources of and the solutions to our current ecological crisis. In investigating these different paradigms and how each constructs the issues, we will come to better understand how these views shape public policy, political movements, public opinion, and even international relations. Cross listed with PS 201. Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 275 E DENDROLOGY: TREES & SHRUBS OF WISC (2.00 credits)
A field course in the identification of trees, shrubs, and woody vines native to Wisconsin and the Great Lakes region as well as some of the common non-native horticultural and invasive species. Emphasis is on observation of plant characteristics permitting easy identification and discussion of the natural history, ecology, distribution, and human uses of each species. The course will also introduce students to basic forest ecology, management, and conservation principles, with emphasis on sustainable use of forests in the Great Lakes region and worldwide. Cross-listed with BIO 275 E.
ENVS 224 DRAWING IN NATURE (3.00 credits)
An experiential hands-on course in the study of art and ecology that provides students with the opportunity to draw outdoors and creatively experience the diversity of the Wisconsin landscape. Students will also explore historic and contemporary visual art with concern for global and local environmental issues. Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 302 2E DUMPSTER 2 ETERNITY: TRASH & CONSEQ (3.00 credits)
This course strives to make visible the by-products of our daily lives, helping us see their travels once we throw them out. Are there alternatives to non-thinking consumption? Is the landfill really the best home for plastic bags? Do we really need all this packaging? What will our trash tell future researchers? As researchers and citizens, we will attempt to answer these questions through shared experiences, reading, and individual exploration. Prerequisite: sophomore status. (S)
ENVS 333 E ECOLOGICAL HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION (3.00 credits)
A global examination of the evolutionary and biological foundations underlying the multi-ethnic societies and diverse cultures observed in the modern world. Beginning with human evolution, this course will follow the sweep of human history through the origins of agriculture and the rise and fall of civilizations to the modern industrial condition. Focusing on biological and ecological processes and the human decisions that have led to the present, this course also explores the challenges faced by a growing and increasingly globalized human population as we move toward the future. Cross-listed with BIO 333. (F) Prerequisites: BIO 151 or consent of instructor.
ENVS 450 E ECOLOGY (4.00 credits)
No species exists in isolation; life on Earth depends on interconnections between organisms and their environment. This course explores this interdependence by considering ecological principles as they pertain to individual organisms, populations, communities, ecosystems, and the biosphere. Special attention is given to the role of humans in global ecological systems. Many topics are explored through field-based research in local natural communities. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Cross-listed with BIO 450. (F) Prerequisites: BIO 151/152 or BIO 181/182.
ENVS 265 E ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION (2.00 credits)
A seminar designed to investigate the ecological, cultural, geographic and economic background of the conservation of natural resources. Some of the specific issues that will be explored are: resource allocation and energy production; water issues; intergenerational externalities and food production; and population pressures. A special section will be devoted to producer and consumer cooperatives and alternative institutional responses to many of these pressing issues. Cross-listed with GEOG 265 E. Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 325 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (2.00 credits)
Examines the mechanisms societies employ to allocate limited natural resources among unlimited demands. By seeing environmental issues as economic issues, this course identifies the incentives faced by consumers and producers that lead to environmental problems and how alternative incentives might alleviate problems like pollution, global warming, and vanishing rainforests; or to promote sustainable resource use. Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 110 EPU ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (3.00 credits)
What ways of thinking help us participate responsibly in the web of life on Earth? This course will help us recognize the interdependence of human society and the natural environment and the ways in which principles of ecological sustainability are essential to building a just and compassionate world. Our course will be built around case studies, other readings, and the chapters of the text. Through the case studies, we will apply critical thinking theory to real life examples and develop an understanding of how these situations affect individuals, the local and larger communities, and the Earth. We will analyze these situations from the core ethical arguments of utilitarian ethics, virtue ethics, and Kantian ethics as well as the ecological ethical frameworks of light green ethics, dark green ethics, biocentrism, and ecocentrism. We will then identify and argue our personal environmental ethic. This course will develop your ability to think philosophically; to think critically about several philosophical traditions in ethics and to apply your abilities and understandings to environmental issues. Cross-listed with PHIL 110. Prerequisites: T tag course.
ENVS 216 EV ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY (3.00 credits)
Environmental geology focuses on the interaction between humans and geological processes that shape Earth's environment. An emphasis is placed upon both how integral earth processes are to human survival and the fact that humans are an integral part of a complex and interactive system called the Earth System. The study of Environmental Geology brings important knowledge and information to the search for solutions to many of the problems facing humanity today. Challenges such as expanding populations, resource distribution and use, energy and water availability and earth processes (especially flooding, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, etc.) that pose serious risks to life and property are addressed. Possible solutions are explored that work within ecological realities and prioritize the ability to meet the needs of the current population without reducing the options available to future generations. Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 352 EJ ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS (4.00 credits)
Major issues in environmental policy, including public lands, wildlife, pollution and energy, as well as the role of governmental institutions, interest groups and the public in formulating environmental policy. Offered in alternate years. Cross-listed with PS 352. Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 102 1E FOOD: YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT (3.00 credits)
You really are what you eat. In this course students will set out on a journey to explore their relationship with food. The journey will take students on a tour of the Earth's atmosphere, soils, and waters; inside human cells to examine how food is utilized, and to remote corners of the globe to evaluate the far-reaching effects that food choices have on the planet. Connections with food are explored both within the local community and around the world. Decisions regarding what we eat every day have considerable effects on our health, the environment, and the well-being of those involved in the production, processing, and transportation of our food. Students will consider how food provisioning has changed throughout human history, how the rise of agriculture changed the way we feed ourselves, and what this has meant for human health and ecological systems. A personal exploration of how food shapes our lives and communities. (F)
ENVS 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - ENVIRONMENTAL S (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
The study of selected topics in Environmental Studies under the direction of a faculty member in the program. (F/S/SS) Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
ENVS 250 EV INTRO TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (3.00 credits)
Humans are intimately connected to the natural world. We not only depend on the environment for our existence and well-being, we are part of the environment and our actions can affect it profoundly. This course explores the connections between humans and our environment by exploring basic ecological principals and applying them to many of the major environmental issues currently faced by humanity. Cross-listed with BIO 250 (F/S) Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 201 LIVING SUST IN DOMINICAN STUDIUM (2.00 credits)
The first of a two-semester, Living & Learning Community which integrates the study and practice of eco-spiritualties and application of the principles of sustainability. Open to students from every religious and spiritual tradition, this LLC integrates the features of the Dominican Studium: Community, Contemplation, Study, and Mission. The first semester includes weekly seminars, regular gatherings for contemplative rituals and eco-celebrations as well as community meetings to deal with the practicalities of living as sustainably as possible. Participants attend a "Constitution-Writing Retreat" the first week of the semester and prepare research papers and public presentations for early December. Cross-listed with RS 201. (F) Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent required of students in their second or third year; Students apply in March for admission to the "Sustainable Living and Learning "Studium" in Dominican Hall and register in April for RS 201.
ENVS 201 2ER LIVING SUST IN DOMINICAN STUDIUM (2.00 credits)
The ENVS 201/202 sequence satisfies the 2, E, and R tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succesfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in ENVS 201 (with no tags) at this time and ENVS 202 2ER in Spring. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of ENVS 202 2ER in the Spring term.
ENVS 202 2ER LIVING SUSTAINABLY IN DOM STUDIUM (2.00 credits)
The second of a two-semester sequence associated with the Sustainable Living & Learning Community in Dominican Hall. Continuing the intensive study of eco-spiritualties and efforts to live sustainably during the Fall in RS 201, student’s partner with others in the wider community in a variety of sustainability efforts through research and practical assistance. In addition to weekly seminars, students summarize their learning, beliefs and actions for the annual Student Academic Showcase and write a COR 2 Statement to articulate their own spirituality, worldview, beliefs and values. Note Well: Students must take both RS 201 and RS 202 in order to fulfill requirements for the COR 2, E and R tags. Prerequisites: RS 201. Cross-listed with RS 202 2ER. (S) Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers; RS 201. Prior or concurrent enrollment in another Environmental Studies course recommended; Acceptance in the "Sustainable Living and Learning Community" in Dominican Hall.
ENVS 206 EV NATURAL COMMUNITIES OF WISCONSIN (3.00 credits)
An exploration of Wisconsin's wetlands, lakes and streams, prairies, savannas, and forests. In field trips and labs, we practice identifying local plants and animals, see some of the science behind our understanding of these biological communities, and support collaborative efforts to preserve our natural heritage. Cross-listed with ENVS 206. (F/SS) Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 353 EJ PLTCS OF SPRWL: LND USE & TRNS PLCY (2.00 credits)
Since World War II, the United States has undergone a revolution in how we live and get around. The suburb is now where most Americans live and the car is how most get around. Ever-spreading development of housing subdivisions and shopping malls at the edges of metropolitan areas, known as suburban sprawl, is increasingly becoming a major local political issue all over the country. This course examines the environmental and social consequences of suburban sprawl and the patterns of mobility associated with it. In doing so, we will closely explore the role of public policies at the local, state, and federal levels in creating, supporting and now questioning this entire system. Cross-listed with PS 353. Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 301 2E ROOTS AND SHOOTS (3.00 credits)
Dynamic interrelationships within and between ecosystems are the key to what we will study in this course as well as the history of human relationship and impact with the natural world and the ecological history of civilization. Finally we will look at what the future may hold for this relationship depending on the choices that each of us make. Course work will include activities both inside and out of doors as we expand our knowledge of the plants and plant communities of the Edgewood campus, the surrounding neighborhoods and the University of Wisconsin Arboretum. The class will collaborate with several community groups and business groups to research and promote the practice of sustainable living. We will also be fostering a culture of sustainability within the Edgewood Community with hands on experience in ecological restoration practices on the Edgewood grounds, the UW Arboretum and the City of Madison parks and Recreation. Field trips will include several Saturday day-trips to scientific areas, Nature Conservancy sites, sustainable housing and LEED certified buildings and one overnight to the Environmental Retreat Center in Mazomanie. Students will collaborate with Woods Edge, the Environmental Studies Student Organization with outdoor activities and community outreach projects. Each student will be expected to make a 20 minute presentation to the class during the month of April. These presentations will illustrate how the material covered in the class relates specifically to the individual students major or main area of interest. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers; prior or concurrent enrollment in another Environmental Studies course recommended. Prerequisite: Sophomore status.
ENVS 460 SPECIAL TOPICS-PERMACULTURE DESIGN (2.00 credits)
An intensive 8-day exploration of permacultural design principles and applications. Students will learn how thoughtful planning can preserve and enhance both people and nature by careful use of resources based on nature's design. Students will complete a design project. Prerequisites: Consent of the Instructor.
ENVS 101 1ER SPIRITUALITY AND ECOLOGY (4.00 credits)
While focusing on Eco-Spirituality and Environmental Justice, this COR 1 course introduces the Dominican Liberal Arts tradition: building a more just and compassionate world through the integration of spirituality, study and service, in a community searching for truth. Through grappling with ecological concerns, students discover connections between their own spiritualties and what they are learning about the environment through various disciplines and their active collaboration in making the world a better place. We join Dominicans and others exploring "Is there a way to reverse global warming?" "Who suffers or benefits most from the way things are?" "What is 'green' living?" "What will motivate & empower us to reduce our own carbon footprints?" Cross-listed with RS 101 1ER. (F) Prerequisites: This course is for first semester freshmen or freshmen transfer students.
ENVS 330 2EG SUSTAINABILITY:GLOBAL-LOCAL CONNECT (3.00 credits)
This course explores how people relate to each other and with the natural world, and how these relationships reflect our values and shape our future. Starting from the premise that we are in the midst of historically unprecedented ecological and social crises that threaten modern civilization, if not our survival as a species, we will examine grassroots movements in different cultures aimed at addressing these crises at both the local and global levels, with particular focus on the U.S. and Latin America. Students will become familiar with key concepts of ecological and cultural sustainability, and apply these concepts in community-based projects that address local needs.   Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers.
ENVS 469A TOPICS-PERMACULTURE DESIGN (2.00 credits)
An intensive 8-day exploration of permacultural design principles and applications. Students will learn how thoughtful planning can preserve and enhance both people and nature by careful use of resources based on nature's design. Students will complete a design project. Prerequisites: Consent of the Instructor.
ENVS 469C TOPICS: ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY (4.00 credits)
In the second course of the Sustainability Leadership Program, we use an ecological framework to explore the scientific basis of sustainable systems and the extension of principles of ecology and natural systems at multiple levels of organization, with emphasis on the fundamental roles of energy flow, nutrient dynamics, and hydrological cycles in ecosystem and biosphere function. We work extensively with principles of ecological design, resilience, and restoration; and we critically analyze key sustainability indicators and reporting frameworks (e.g., ecological and carbon footprints, green building certifications, Global Reporting Initiative, Genuine Progress Indicator). Key related concepts considered in some depth include: ecosystem services; adaptive management; regeneration; permaculture; biomimicry; integral ecology; indigenous knowledge systems; ecospirituality. Prerequisites: SUST 650.
ENVS 469B TOPICS: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (4.00 credits)
This course provides the foundation for the Sustainability Leadership Program. We introduce major approaches to and measures of sustainability (e.g., ecological design, permaculture, biomimicry, life-cycle costing, triple bottom line, natural capitalism, ecological footprint, bioregionalism, The Natural Step, Transition movement); explore relationships among sustainability, economic development, and social justice; and apply systems thinking and sustainability principles to specific issues. We also use existing models and team projects to examine how personal values, goals, and communication styles influence our roles as change agents; and we practice a variety or methods (e.g Scenario Thinking, Appreciative Inquiry, World Cafe, Open Space) that can promote networking, public participation, planning, and group decision-making on sustainability issues. This is a mostly residential course designed to create a community of reflective learners that support each other in becoming effective as social entrepreneurs and sustainability change agents. Prerequisites: Admissions into Sustainability Leadership Program or consent of the instructor.
ENVS 469D TOPICS:SOCIAL & ECON SUSTAINABILITY (4.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 469E TOPICS:SUSTAINABILITY LDSP CAPSTONE (3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
ENVS 489 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Independent research related to environmental studies to be completed in collaboration with a faculty member or researchers from other agencies. (F/S/SS) Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
ENVS 303 2E YOU BIT IT, YOU BOUGHT IT: FOOD (3.00 credits)
Every day, the dietary choices we make have consequences for us, our communities, the environment, and people across the globe. An examination of agriculture, the food industry, and advertising reveals the causes of numerous social problems for a culture over-fed yet under-nourished by the food we produce. Yet Dane County and Madison boast some of the most progressive food practices in the nation that we’ll see first-hand. From CSAs to farmers’ markets to the Feed Kitchen, Madisonians work hard to protect our foodshed.

ETHS 359 D AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY (4.00 credits)
African American history from the beginning of the African Diaspora to the present. Cross-listed with HIST 359 D. Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 271 2DH ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (4.00 credits)
This course examines major issues in the history of the Asian American experience from the middle of the 19th century to present, including the causes of early Asian immigration, the formation of Asian American communities and Asian American culture/identity, the history of exclusion/discrimination and resistance, and Asian Americans' contributions to American democracy. While special attention will be given to Chinese and Japanese Americans, students will also examine other Asian immigrants, such as East Indians, Koreans, and Hmongs. As it is a community-based learning course, students in this class are required to participate in activities that will allow them to interact with Asian Americans in the greater Madison community to explore Asian American cultures and race/ethnic relations. They will be guided to rethink their sense of self, their relations with other race/ethnic groups, and their American identity through studying Asian American views on self, community, social justice, equal rights, and democracy. Out of this experience, a deep understanding of their role in constructing a more justice and compassionate world will be achieved. Cross-listed with HIST 251 2DH. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers.
ETHS 325A CDQ ASIAN AMERICAN WRITERS (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected works of various genres (e.g., fiction, drama, memoir, and film) by Asian American women and men of diverse ethnicities. Emphasizing the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity, feminist criticism, and cultural studies, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in Asian American literature and literary studies? What textual strategies do Asian American writers employ to represent Asian American self-identities and cultural politics? In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant representations of Asian American women and men as raced and gendered subjects? In what ways do the subject positions of the writers, characters, and readers impact our understanding of Asian American texts? Cross-listed with ENG 325A. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone and sophomore standing.
ETHS 415A CDQ BLACK WOMEN WRITERS (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected novels, short stories, and essays by African American women writers in the 20th and 21st centuries. Emphasizing the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity and Black feminist criticism, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in Black women's literature? What textual strategies do African American women writers employ to represent Blackness and womanhood? In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant discourses of race, gender, class and sexuality? What does it mean to be a Black feminist reader, and what does it mean for non-Black and/or non-female readers to interpret Black women's writings? Cross-listed with ENG 415A CDQ & WS 415A CDQ. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone and junior standing.
ETHS 481 GQU CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL FEMINISMS (4.00 credits)
What issues are important to women in different parts of the world? How do those issues relate to one another? What makes an issue "feminist" or not? How do we conceive of feminisms outside of our borders, whether those borders are geographic, political, or personal? What strategies can we employ to understand women's lives and concerns in different cultures, locations, and times? Is it possible to actively support feminist causes across the globe without imposing dangerous sets of limiting assumptions? This course is an exploration of the methods, concepts, and experiences of feminism as it is practiced all over the world in different ways. The historical development and cultural mappings of feminism since the second wave will be our main concern, but we will maintain specificity by focusing on particular locations, and on locational concerns. Three large units will make up the course: feminism and race at the end of the second wave and into the present; postcolonial critiques of feminism and issues of religion, rights, and class in various locations throughout the world; and transnational approaches to feminist identity, politics and possibilities. Throughout our explorations of contemporary feminisms, we will interrogate how our own lives and choices affect the lives of women around the world, in part by investigating the origins of products we purchase regularly. Feminist theorists from a variety of disciplines including philosophy, literature, political science, history and sociology will provide groundwork for our explorations, which will be filled out through case studies, historical texts and literary narratives. Cross-listed with WS 480. Prerequisites: ENG 110 and ENG 280.
ETHS 150A 1D DIVERSE LANDSCAPES IN US CULTURE (4.00 credits)
This course examines from a sociological perspective the ramifications of a multicultural population within a given setting, paying special attention to the complex relationships between landscapes and the diverse communities who inhabit these spaces. Students will examine their relationships to these communities and the relationships within, paying attention to the ways race, class, gender and sexuality shape these settings. Emphasis will be placed on the research method of ethnography, with each student learning how to write an ethnography centered on a specific setting. S/he will take special note of all interactions within the setting. Prerequisites: This course is for first semester freshmen or freshmen transfer students. (F)
ETHS 200 D ED & IDENTITY IN PLRALISTIC SOCIETY (3.00 credits)
Students will examine, interact with, and explore the pluralistic and diverse educations and identities of peoples in Wisconsin, the United States, and beyond through the lenses of privilege, oppression, and opportunity before and beyond the 21st century. Individual and institutional discrimination will be examined through culturally significant identity vistas that include race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, language, and ability. Through self-analysis and reflection, historical investigation linked with analysis of contemporary schools and society, school/community-based experiences, and communication-skill building, students will learn how to be culturally responsive to the contexts of communities and the dynamics of difference. Course meets Wisconsin DPI American Indian Tribes requirement. Course will have a primary emphasis on Wisconsin Teacher Standards 3, 6, and 10 and will involve fieldwork. Cross-listed with ED 200 D Prerequisites: sophomore standing or consent of the School of Education. 
ETHS 200C 2D ED & IDENTITY IN PLRALISTIC SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
This course stresses the emphasis on students developing the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to work successfully in pluralistic classrooms and professional environments. It will integrate a community-based learning experience at the Lussier Community Center. Students will work with elementary or middle school youth in an after school enrichment program called LEAP 2 College, the goals of which are to better prepare students who are traditionally under-represented in higher education for college access and success. Students who enroll in this course must be availble to volunteer at Lussier from 3:30-5:00pm on either Tuesdays or Thursdays. LEAP 2 College gives students the opportunity to build relationships with youth and provides a lens through which to understand the implications of individual and institutional discrimination on achievement and college access. Students will learn to be responsive to the cuntural contexts of communities and the dynamics of difference. They will use their understanding of the past and present to inform their professional practice, and consider their role in working for the building of a more just and compassionate world in the face of complexity. Course meets Wisconsin DPI American Indian Tribes requirement, and has s primary emphasis on Wisconsin Teacher Standards 3, 6, 9, and 10. Prerequisite: COR 1 and sophomore standing. (F/S) Cross-listed with ETHS 200C 2D.
ETHS 495B ETHNIC STUDIES INTERNSHIP (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
The internship offers Ethnic Studies majors and minors firsthand knowledge, skills, and experiences related to ethnic studies. Students will work in a setting that serves racially and ethnically diverse populations, and internships will be available through sites approved by the Ethnic Studies Program. Majors are required to complete a minimum of three credits, or eight hours per week throughout the semester for a total of 120 hours. Prerequisites: Junior standing, ETHS 201, concurrent enrollment in ETHS 495A, and consent of instructor.
ETHS 495A 3 ETHNIC STUDIES INTERNSHIP SEMINAR (1.00 credits)
The internship seminar examines and reflects on the knowledge, skills, and experiences acquired from internship settings. Integrating the Ethnic Studies Program goals, the General Education COR guiding questions, and the internship experience, the course explores the following key questions: What does the internship mean to one’s studies as an Ethnic Studies major/minor and one’s intended profession? What are the ethical implications of interning or working at a site that serves primarily communities of color? In what ways do race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class intersect and shape power relations in the internship setting, and what is the student intern’s social location in the setting? What are the unique needs and contributions of the historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups and the new (im)migrant populations in our communities? How does the internship deepen one’s understanding of one’s own gifts, values, and commitments in building a just, compassionate world? Prerequisites: Junior standing, ETHS 201 DJ, concurrent registration in ETHS 495B or an internship course in a related field, and COR II.
ETHS 250C CD FAULKNER&MORRISON: SLAVERY'S LEGACY (4.00 credits)
Very few important American writers have considered slavery and its legacies in American culture with the intensity and originality of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison. Their novels and stories span the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to show how the effects of slavery haunted later generations up to the present day. This course examines these two writers within a rich context of secondary readings to provide rich historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts. Students will learn how to interpret themes of race and ethnicity in strong literary and socio-historical contexts. The course will focus particularly on how course readings reflect the legacies of slavery in U.S. culture. Cross-listed with ENG 250B CD.
ETHS 443B CDX FOC STUD: ETHNIC AM STUDIES-SLAVERY (4.00 credits)
This course will examine a range of scenes of slavery as depicted in literary fiction, period accounts, historical documentation, photography and other imagery, and critical theory. This range of texts and images will reveal the lived experiences of slaves across time periods and different goeographic locations. We will examine how slaves were transported to the Americas (particularly North America), how their enslavement was achieved materially and psychologically, how their bodies were treated and abused, how they were viewed by sympathizers and opponents of slavery, how the idea of slavery figured in debates about the establishment of the new United States, how they revolted and rebelled and how these rebellions were quashed, how they were controlled through legal and cultural circumscription, how they sought control of their own circumstances and destinies, how they sought escape and sometimes succeeded, and how they wrote accounts of their experiences in an effort to be heard. Prerequisite: ENG 110. (S) Cross-listed with ENG 443B CDX.
ETHS 262 FOUNDATIONS OF ESL & BILINGUAL EDUC (3.00 credits)
This course introduces students to the historical, political, and social issues that contributed to the formulation of local, state, and federal educational policies for linguistically and culturally diverse students. The aspects of language acquisition theories as they relate to specific program models are included through a prism of cultural and linguistic relevant pedagogy and educational empowerment through family and community engagement.   Cross-listed with ED 262. Prerequisites: Preliminary Entry to Teacher Education.
ETHS 480B 3D FREEDOM RIDES: CIV RIGHTS&BLACK PWR (4.00 credits)
In this course students will learn about the freedom struggle in the North, so that they can better understand that the Movement--and racism--was and is not confined to the American South but that places such as Milwaukee, Chicago, Indianapolis and Detroit all witnessed very turbulent freedom movements in the 1960s and 1970s. In addition to lectures, discussions, films, and guest lectures, a big portion of this course will center around our "Freedom Rides" throughout the North during fall break. We will travel to all the aforementioned cities, visiting important places from the Civil Rights era, as well as listening to veterans of that struggle. Prerequisite: junior standing and consent of the instructor.
ETHS 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - ETHNIC STUDIES (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
An in-depth exploration of an ethnic studies topic. Ethnic Studies program approval and supervision required. (Consent of Instructor) (F/S/SS) Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
ETHS 480E INT SEM: BRIDG BORDERS:US/MEX IMG 1 (3.00 credits)
This course focuses on borders and bridges between the neighboring people of Mexico and the U.S. We will examine the root causes of Mexican immigration to the U.S., as well as the rhetoric, cultural practices and public policies that have built physical and symbolic walls between the two countries. We will also learn about the educational and social activist work of "bridging" organizations in the U.S. that have attempted to promote understanding and tolerance and advocate for the human rights of immigrants. Using these bridging models as inspiration, we will develop our own major "bridging" projects. Students must complete both ETHS 480E and 480F in order to meet the requirements for ETHS 480.Cross-listed with SOC 377. Prerequisites: Any G tag course, COR 1
ETHS 480E 2DG INT SEM: BRIDG BORDERS:US/MEX IMG 1 (3.00 credits)
A continuation of ETHS 480E, this Winterim session will involve travel to Veracruz, Mexico. Students must complete both ETHS 480E and 480F in order to meet the requirements for ETHS 480. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers; ETHS 480E.
ETHS 480F 2DG INT SEM: BRIDG BORDERS:US/MEX IMG 2 (1.00 credits)
The ETHS 480E/480F sequence satisfies the 2, D, and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succesfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the 2, D, and G tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in ETHS 480E at this time and ETHS 480F 2DG in the Winterim 2014 term (registration is also open now). The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of ETHS 480F 2DG in the Winterim term.
ETHS 480H INTEGR SEM: LIBERATION THEOLOGY I (2.00 credits)
This course is an opportunity to identify and develop your personal spirituality through the study of Black Liberation Theology and dismantling racism. You will integrate insights from the philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the theologies of Black and Womanist Theologians in reflecting on your own community-based engagement in the dismantling of racism and building "the beloved community" envisioned by Dr. King. This two-semester sequence meets one day each week for two hours in both the Fall and Spring semesters and requires significant participation in community-based and/or service-learning. Both semesters are required to fulfill COR 2 or Ethnic Studies 480. Cross-listed with RS 308. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent, Junior standing
ETHS 480H 2DR INTEGR SEM: LIBERATION THEOLOGY I (2.00 credits)
The ETHS 480H/ETHS 480I sequence satisfies the 2, D, and R tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succesfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the 2, D, and R tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in ETHS 480H at this time and ETHS 480I 2DR in Spring. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of ETHS 480I 2DR in the Spring term.
ETHS 480I 2DR INTEGR SEM: LIBERATION THEOLOGY II (2.00 credits)
Integrating insights from the first semester's consideration of racism and white privilege, the philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the theologies of Black and Womanist Theologians, this semester focuses on what is being done to dismantle racism in your own field of study (major or minor), area of community involvement (volunteer or athletic organization) or intended career path. Students are required to participate in the annual White Privilege Conference (additional cost for travel and registration) OR a minimum of 20 hours of community-based anti-racism or healing racism series and multicultural trainings offered in the Madison area. Students report on their own efforts to dismantle racism during the annual Student Academic Showcase.  Each student completes a COR 2 Statement connecting learning beliefs/values and stance on racism and building "the beloved community" envisioned by Dr. King. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers; ETHS 480H.
ETHS 480D 2GR INTEGRATIVE SEM: CHALLENGE OF ISLAM (4.00 credits)
The events of 9/11 and other recent radical Muslim terrorist activities worldwide have caused both a growing interest in understanding Islam and an increased animosity toward the faith accompanied by stereotyping and profiling individuals. The presupposition of this course is that the "challenge of Islam" cannot be addressed without understanding Islam's scriptures, values, history, culture, and attitude toward politics. The challenge can present itself either as one to Muslims or one to non-Muslims. All students will complete an experiential component with members of the Muslim community of Madison through individual conversational partners and through dialogue with guest presenters in class. Cross-listed with RS 356 2GR. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
ETHS 480 INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR IN ETHNIC STUDI (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
The seminar integrates advanced research and community-based learning, focusing on selected themes or issues in ethnic studies. Synthesizing the goals of the major and minor, the course applies integrative approaches to the development of multicultural understanding.  For two-session topics, students must complete both semesters to satisfy the ETHS 480 requirement. Cross-listed with 300-400 level COR courses approved by Ethnic Studies.  (F/W/S/SS) Prerequisites: junior standing or consent of the instructor.
ETHS 480C 2DP INTEGRATV SEM: PHILOSOPHY OF MLK JR (4.00 credits)
This course discusses a shared inquiry into the nonviolent philosophy of M.L. King and its relevance both in the Civil Rights movement and in diverse communities in the U.S. and beyond. Students will study and discuss Dr. King's writings, reflect on their own potential for helping build the "Beloved Community," and engage in relevant service learning projects such as Amnesty International, the United Nations Association, and Fair Trade Advocacy. If funds are available, we may travel to the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis. Cross-listed with PHIL 307 2DP. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers; completion of the T tag or concurrent enrollment in a T tag course.
ETHS 317 D INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
This course is the study of how individuals perceive and react to cultural rules, and how those perceptions and reactions affect the ways they communicate with one another. The general goals of the class are for students to develop understanding of the role that identity plays in intercultural communication, develop understanding of how cultural rules affect communication, learn how cultures differ from each other and how they come together and coexist, and develop competence in communicating with people of various cultures in the United States and beyond. Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 480A 2CD INTG SEM: IMMIGRANT NARRATIVES (4.00 credits)
An integrative seminar in ethnic studies, literary studies, and community-based learning, this course investigates, through multidisciplinary lenses, the issues of migration, border, and identities in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. Focusing on immigrant narratives of various genres, such as fiction, film, autobiography, and oral narrative, by women and men of diverse ethnic and racial ancestries, and integrating classroom inquiry and community engagement, we will explore the following questions: What are the major themes and issues in immigrant narratives? What does it mean to cross borders, and what motivates and causes border crossings? What are the possibilities and problems of border crossings? In what ways do immigrant and diasporic subjects challenge or negotiate boundaries that seek to oppress, exclude or constrain? How do the forces of race, ethnicity, gender, and class intersect in the construction of immigrant or diasporic identities? In what ways do immigrant narratives challenge or accommodate the US national discourse of immigrant integration and progress? How does the study of migration, border, and identities shape our understanding of our own histories and identity constructions? What is our role in building communities committed to cultural pluralism and social justice? Cross-listed with COR 380 2CD. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers; ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
ETHS 222 GJ INTRO TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the nature and diversity of human society and culture through an examination of specific cross-cultural cases. It includes a comparative study of social, political and economic organization, patterns of religious and aesthetic orientations, gender issues, relations with the natural environment, as well as the process of sociocultural persistence and change. Special consideration will be given to the circumstances faced by contemporary small-scale societies. Cross-listed with ANTH 222 GJ. Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 201 DJ INTRODUCTION TO ETHNIC STUDIES (4.00 credits)
This is a gateway course for majors and minors in Ethnic Studies, as well as for all who are interested in learning about peoples of color in the United States in a global context. Using sociological, historical, and other disciplinary concepts and methods, the course introduces the history and current development of ethnic studies as an academic discipline; fundamental concepts and issues in ethnic studies; and the historical, social, and cultural experiences of African American, Latino/a American, Asian and Pacific American, and Native American peoples and/or other historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups in the United States, focusing on issues of race and ethnicity as they intersect with class, gender, sexuality, and nation. (F/S) Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 242 CDX LITERATURE OF AMERICAN MINORITIES (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to literatures of ethnic minorities in the U.S., including Native American, African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American literatures. We will read a number of significant 20th-century texts which have shaped ethnic minority traditions and have become part and parcel of American literature. We will explore such major issues as identity, culture, history, race, gender, sexuality, and class. We will examine how these texts present specific ethnic experiences via diverse literary means and innovations and by doing so contribute to American literature and culture. Cross-listed with ENG 242 CDX. (S) Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
ETHS 264 ADU MULTICULTURAL ART IN THE USA (4.00 credits)
This course provides an inclusive, multicultural introduction to 20th- and 21st-century art of the US, with emphasis on ways that art is related to the historical, social, and cultural contexts in which it is created. We consider such questions as: How have the social dynamics of race and ethnicity, along with gender and class, shaped the experiences of American artists and their audiences at various historical moments during the past hundred years? How do artists' social positions inform their artistic responses to questions of modernity? What does art by artists of diverse ethnicities tell us about the historic and contemporary experiences of various cultural groups in the US? As well as exploring movements in art of the US and the work of individual artists of various ethnicities, this course introduces the students to methodological and theoretical issues underlying the study of modern and contemporary art in the US, and ways that consideration and critical analysis of multiple disciplinary and social perspectives can enrich our understanding of this art. Readings, class discussion, group inquiry projects, and other assignments will emphasize the development of reflective, creative, and critical approaches to the study of visual art. Cross-listed with ART 264 ADU. Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 362 ADX NATIVE AMERICAN ART (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to North American Indian, or Native American, art, and to the broader questions underlying its study. Focus will be on post-contact Native American art, the impact on this art of encounters between Indian and non-Indian peoples, and 20th-21st century art. Particular attention is given to indigenous perspectives through the writings of Native American scholars and artists. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
ETHS 480J 2D NATIVE AMERICAN SPIRITUALITY (4.00 credits)
An experiential and community-based survey of native religious traditions, exploring the breadth and depth of spiritual expression among native people in North America, with particular emphasis on the Anishinabe bands of Wisconsin. Important themes include sacred landscapes, mythic narratives, oral histories, communal identities, tribal values, elder teachigns, visionary experiences, ceremonial practices, prayer traditions, and trickster wisdom. This course includes significant engagement in Native American communities. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent, I, T, and W tags. Cross-Listed with RS 351 2D
ETHS 443A CDQ PASSING NARR: ETHNIC AM LITERATURE (4.00 credits)
This course will examine a range of scenes of slavery as depicted in literary fiction, period accounts, historical documentation, photography and other imagery, and critical theory. This range of texts and images will reveal the lived experiences of slaves across time periods and different goeographic locations. We will examine how slaves were transported to the Americas (particularly North America), how their enslavement was achieved materially and psychologically, how their bodies were treated and abused, how they were viewed by sympathizers and opponents of slavery, how the idea of slavery figured in debates about the establishment of the new United States, how they revolted and rebelled and how these rebellions were quashed, how they were controlled through legal and cultural circumscription, how they sought control of their own circumstances and destinies, how they sought escape and sometimes succeeded, and how they wrote accounts of their experiences in an effort to be heard. Prerequisite: ENG 110. (S) Cross-listed with ENG 443B CDX.
ETHS 309 D RACE & ETHNICITY (4.00 credits)
This course engages students in an analysis of historical and contemporary experiences of race and ethnicity in the United States as influenced by changing migration trends and economic developments. Special consideration is given to the social construction of racial categories; issues of whiteness; and multiracial identity. Cross-listed with SOC 309 D. Prerequisites: One of the following: SOC 201, ANTH 222, PSY 101.
ETHS 150B 1D RETHINKING THE BORDER: US IMMIGRATN (3.00 credits)
Though the traditional US immigrant narrative focuses on those immigrants who came into Ellis Island, in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, this course turns its gaze to the long US-Mexican border (understood both as a physical barrier between the two countries, but also a psychological reality) and the crucial role of Mexican immigrants in shaping the US, not only in the traditional ‘borderlands’ of California and the Southwest, but across the country. While we focus on the experiences of Mexican immigrants, we also give attention to the larger historical context of US immigration. Through an exploration of a range of immigrant expressions (songs, narratives, fiction, documentaries, interviews), this course examines the roles and contributions of Mexican and other immigrants in US history. Against the backdrop of an increasingly multicultural United States, we consider the breadth and depth of cultural history and experience that make up the US, even as we examine the ways in which immigrants (both historically and today) come under attack. Prerequisites: This course is for first semester freshmen. (F)
ETHS 490 X SENIOR SEMINAR IN ETHNIC STUDIES (4.00 credits)
In this capstone research seminar, graduating majors and minors will be guided to examine a significant issue in the critical study of race and ethnicity and complete an intermediate-length research paper, integrating the theories and methods from prior Ethnic Studies coursework and reflecting knowledge and approaches from more than one Ethnic Studies-related field. In guiding students throughout the research and writing process, the seminar seeks to enhance their abilities not only to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize published primary and secondary research but also to conduct firnsthand research and contribute to the public and academic discourses on the issue. At the same time, the course invites students to examine the ethical implications of their research, especially its impact on communities of color and the power relations between the researcher and the researched, and to forge connnections among academic inquiry, advocacy, and social change. Prerequisites: Senior standing, ETHS 390, 495A, and 495B or consent of the instructor.
ETHS 204 DH SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN AMERICAN HISTOR (4.00 credits)
The course examines the process of social change in U.S. history from the period of Native American and European contact to the 1980s. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing the causes and consequences of "rights" movements in American history. Cross-listed with HIST 204 DH. Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 301 BD TAP DANCE:TECHNIQ & CULT PERSPECTIV (3.00 credits)
This course, for students with little or no knowledge of tap dance, spans the development and place of the form from its early roots in the Americas of 1600 to the present. It combines pedagogical study of the multi-cultural elements of this art from participatory studio work to build basic understanding of music, movement and cultural sensitivity. An American hybrid art form, the course illuminates the intersection of history and culture.
ETHS 250 THEMES AND ISSUES IN ETHNIC STUDIES (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
A study of historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. through the exploration of various topics, such as ethnic autobiography, slave narratives, the Civil Rights movement, Chicano art, or the graphic novel. Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 250B CDX THEMES: AMERICAN SLAVE NARRATIVES (4.00 credits)
During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, slaves of African origin composed a series of autobiographies that revised literary genres to finally give voice to experiences shared by millions forced into bondage over several centuries. As first-person stories with great political and historical significance, slave narratives reflect the inherent disjunction between the American ideal of equality and its continued use of brutal forced servitude. The development of the slave narrative as a literary genre provides a unique perspective on American cultural and political history while acknowledging voices long exiled from the American canon. Cross-listed with ENG 260A CDX. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
ETHS 250D CDX THEMES: MULTI-ETHNIC GRAPHIC NOVEL (4.00 credits)
This course is designed to introduce to students contemporary multi-ethnic American literature through the graphic novel as an increasingly significant literary genre for academic inquiry. We will read a number of significant graphic novels by Native American, African American, Latino/a American, Jewish American, Asian American, and white American graphic novelists and will explore such major issues as identity, culture, history, memory, community, race, gender, sexuality, and class. Students will gain knowledge of diverse multi-ethnic experiences and various literary expressions through the genre of the graphic novel and will develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills to interpret literary texts. Cross-listed with ENG 250D CDX. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
ETHS 390 KU THEORIES & MTHODS IN ETHNIC STUDIES (4.00 credits)
How has "race" been explained and explored by different disciplines? What new conceptual and interpretive approaches have been developed in ethnic studies? This course provides an advanced study of critical theories and research methods in ethnic studies, integrating multiple perspectives and disciplines, such as history, sociology, literary studies, and cultural studies. Examining an array of critical approaches, including critical race theory, postcolonial studies, feminism and race, and diaspora studies, we will develop the critical vocabulary and frameworks for understanding the history and contemporary impact of race within the U.S and in a global context. The course also provides students with various skills, approaches, and strategies for research on race and ethnicity. Prerequisites: ETHS 201 and junior standing.
ETHS 271B H TOPIC: AFRICAN AMERICANS AND FILM (4.00 credits)
The course examines the portrayals of African Americans in Cinema/TV over the past century. Students will also become well-versed in African American history as a whole to better contextualize the films they study in the semester. In addition, the course seeks to demonstrate the continuity and change in African American history and in Hollywood's portrayal of Black people. For instance, how did African Americans respond to the depiction of Blacks in Birth of a Nation and Shaft? How (and why) has Hollywood shifted its portrayal of people of color over the years? Finally, this course will emphasize the differences between primary and secondary documents as well as the pros and cons that each may have for students of history.
ETHS 401 TOPICS IN ETHNIC STUDIES (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
Advanced study of selected themes or issues, such as ethnic diasporas, immigration, indigenous history, or race and popular culture. Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 430B TOPICS: AFRO-AMERICAN COMMUNITIES (3.00 credits)
This course explores African-American language, culture, and communication with in-depth and critical interpretations within a social and historical context. Crosslisted with COMMS 430B.  Prerequisites: None.
ETHS 401A K TOPICS: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (3.00 credits)
In this course we will focus on the theories, ethics, and issues related to counseling within a multicultural context. Working effectively with diverse clients requires self-awareness, the skills for successful interaction, and knowledge of information specific to various cultures/populations, and the ability to engage in a relationship with those from other cultures/populations. Implications of cultural ethnic, geographic, and sexual diversity are considered as they relate to developing a multicultural perspective in studying and understanding human behavior, as well as its application in professional settings. Prerequisite: PSY 101 J or consent of the instructor. Cross-listed with PSY 382 D.
ETHS 382 D TOPICS: MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING (4.00 credits)
In this course we will focus on the theories, ethics, and issues related to counseling within a multicultural context. Working effectively with diverse clients requires self-awareness, the skills for successful interaction, and knowledge of information specific to various cultures/populations, and the ability to engage in a relationship with those from other cultures/populations. Implications of cultural ethnic, geographic, and sexual diversity are considered as they relate to developing a multicultural perspective in studying and understanding human behavior, as well as its application in professional settings. Prerequisite: PSY 101 J or consent of the instructor. Cross-listed with PSY 382 D.
ETHS 344 DQR WOMEN AND MULTICULTURAL THEOLOGIES (4.00 credits)
How do women theologians from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds understand and discuss God, Jesus, Human Beings, the Bible, Spirituality, Ecology and the Roles of Women in religion and society today? How do North American women “do theology” in their African-American, Latina, Native American, Asian-American, Euro-American and/or socio-economic contexts?  What kinds of theology are women theologians in Latin America, Asia and Africa doing?  In what ways do race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and nation shape the formation and development of Christian feminist theologies? From multicultural perspectives, this course explores the questions, experiences, values, concerns, and challenges that women bring to the understanding and practice of Christian faith and its implications for building a more just and compassionate world. Prerequisites: I-, T-, and W- tags or their equivalents. Cross-listed with ETHS 344 DQR.

LAS 380 EL SALVADOR:THE LAND AND THE PEOPLE (2.00 credits)
This seminar is an experiential and interdisciplinary exploration of the land and the people of El Salvador from the perspective of international solidarity and sistering. As we examine the interrelated political, economic and cultural systems of El Salvador, our focus will be to define international solidarity and to explore the development of grass-roots social movements as a means to develop a sense of understanding and connection between the peoples of the United States and El Salvador. Our class will study and promote the practices of consciousness raising, empowerment, and liberation, and explore the meanings of democracy for us in the United States and for the Salvadoran people. Class includes mandatory travel to El Salvador during Winterim with associated costs. (F, even years) Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. Must register for LAS 381 2G. The LAS 380/381 sequence satisfies the 2 and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both the fall and spring courses. Enroll in LAS 380 for fall and GAS 381 2G for spring. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of LAS 381 2G in the spring term.
LAS 380 2G EL SALVADOR:THE LAND AND THE PEOPLE (2.00 credits)
This seminar is an experiential and interdisciplinary exploration of the land and the people of El Salvador from the perspective of international solidarity and sistering. As we examine the interrelated political, economic and cultural systems of El Salvador, our focus will be to define international solidarity and to explore the development of grass-roots social movements as a means to develop a sense of understanding and connection between the peoples of the United States and El Salvador. Our class will study and promote the practices of consciousness raising, empowerment, and liberation, and explore the meanings of democracy for us in the United States and for the Salvadoran people. Class includes mandatory travel to El Salvador during Winterim with associated costs. (F, even years) Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. Must register for LAS 381 2G. The LAS 380/381 sequence satisfies the 2 and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both the fall and spring courses. Enroll in LAS 380 for fall and GAS 381 2G for spring. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of LAS 381 2G in the spring term.
LAS 381 2G EL SALVADOR:THE LAND AND THE PEOPLE (2.00 credits)
This seminar is an experiential and interdisciplinary exploration of the land and the people of El Salvador from the perspective of international solidarity and sistering. As we examine the interrelated political, economic and cultural systems of El Salvador, our focus will be to define international solidarity and to explore the development of grass-roots social movements as a means to develop a sense of understanding and connection between the peoples of the United States and El Salvador. Our class will study and promote the practices of consciousness raising, empowerment, and liberation, and explore the meanings of democracy for us in the United States and for the Salvadoran people. Class includes mandatory travel to El Salvador during Winterim with associated costs. (S, even years) Prerequisites: open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers; LAS 380.

GS 380 EL SALVADOR:THE LAND AND THE PEOPLE (2.00 credits)
This seminar is an experiential and interdisciplinary exploration of the land and the people of El Salvador from the perspective of international solidarity and sistering. As we examine the interrelated political, economic and cultural systems of El Salvador, our focus will be to define international solidarity and to explore the development of grass-roots social movements as a means to develop a sense of understanding and connection between the peoples of the United States and El Salvador. Our class will study and promote the practices of consciousness raising, empowerment, and liberation, and explore the meanings of democracy for us in the United States and for the Salvadoran people. Class includes mandatory travel to El Salvador during winterim with associated costs. (F, even years) Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. Must register for GS 381 2G. The GS 380/381 sequence satisfies the 2 and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both the fall and spring courses. Enroll in GS 380 for fall and GS 381 2G for spring. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of GS 381 2G in the spring term.
GS 380 2G EL SALVADOR:THE LAND AND THE PEOPLE (2.00 credits)
This seminar is an experiential and interdisciplinary exploration of the land and the people of El Salvador from the perspective of international solidarity and sistering. As we examine the interrelated political, economic and cultural systems of El Salvador, our focus will be to define international solidarity and to explore the development of grass-roots social movements as a means to develop a sense of understanding and connection between the peoples of the United States and El Salvador. Our class will study and promote the practices of consciousness raising, empowerment, and liberation, and explore the meanings of democracy for us in the United States and for the Salvadoran people. Class includes mandatory travel to El Salvador during winterim with associated costs. (F, even years) Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. Must register for GS 381 2G. The GS 380/381 sequence satisfies the 2 and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both the fall and spring courses. Enroll in GS 380 for fall and GS 381 2G for spring. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of GS 381 2G in the spring term.
GS 381 2G EL SALVADOR:THE LAND AND THE PEOPLE (2.00 credits)
This seminar is an experiential and interdisciplinary exploration of the land and the people of El Salvador from the perspective of international solidarity and sistering. As we examine the interrelated political, economic and cultural systems of El Salvador, our focus will be to define international solidarity and to explore the development of grass-roots social movements as a means to develop a sense of understanding and connection between the peoples of the United States and El Salvador. Our class will study and promote the practices of consciousness raising, empowerment, and liberation, and explore the meanings of democracy for us in the United States and for the Salvadoran people. Class includes mandatory travel to El Salvador during Winterim with associated costs. (S, even years) Prerequisites: open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers; GS 380.
GS 351 2G GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP: LT STUDY ABROAD (2.00 credits)
This two-part course is designed for students who have applied to a study abroad program 5 weeks or longer. To receive the COR 2 and G tags, students must participate in pre-departure meetings in the semester prior to study abroad, enroll in aprogram. Around the theme of global citizenship students will prepare for and engage in a meaningful community-based learning experience in the host country, culminating in a personal mission statement. The cost of the study abroad program is in addition to the tuition of these two courses. Prerequisites: open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers; GS 350; submitted application for a study abroad program.
GS 350 GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP: LT STUDY ABROAD (1.00 credits)
This two-part course is designed for students who have applied to a study abroad program 5 weeks or longer. To receive the COR 2 and G tags, students must participate in pre-departure meetings in the semester prior to study abroad, enroll in GS 350 during the study abroad program, and enroll in GS 351 2G during the semester after the study abroad program. Around the theme of global citizenship students will prepare for and engage in a meaningful community-based learning experience in the host country, culminating in a personal mission statement. The cost of the study abroad program is in addition to the tuition of these two courses. Prerequisites: COR 1; submitted application for a study abroad program. The GS 350/351 sequence satisfies the 2 and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both courses. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of GS 351 2G.
GS 379 GLOBAL STUDIES INDEPENDENT STUDY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
A program of independent reading/research, given with the consent of the instructor. Prerequisites: None.
GS 270 INTL SERVICE LEARNING IN CAMBODIA (2.00 credits)
This course will help participants to become culturally competent, life-long learners, and active citizens in our global world. The clinical component will enhance assessment skills, cultural competency, and develop critical thinking. The education component will provide real life teaching experiences for students working with an underserved population in Cambodia. There is classroom instruction before travel and then post-travel activities and presentations. (F) Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent, open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. Must register for GS 271 2G. The GS 270/271 sequence satisfies the 2 and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succedssfully complete both courses. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of GS 271 2G.
GS 270 2G INTL SERVICE LEARNING IN CAMBODIA (2.00 credits)
This course will help participants to become culturally competent, life-long learners, and active citizens in our global world. The clinical component will enhance assessment skills, cultural competency, and develop critical thinking. The education component will provide real life teaching experiences for students working with an underserved population in Cambodia. There is classroom instruction before travel and then post-travel activities and presentations. (F) Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent, open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. Must register for GS 271 2G. The GS 270/271 sequence satisfies the 2 and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both courses. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of GS 271 2G.
GS 271 2G INTL SERVICE LEARNING IN CAMBODIA (2.00 credits)
This course will help participants to become culturally competent, life-long learners, and active citizens in our global world. The clinical component will enhance assessment skills, cultural competency, and develop critical thinking. The education component will provide real life teaching experiences for students working with an underserved population in Cambodia. There is classroom instruction before travel and then post-travel activities and presentations. (S) Prerequisites: GS 270; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
GS 111 G INTRO LATIN AMER STUDIES (4.00 credits)
This introductory course, required for the Latin American Studies Minor, explores contemporary Latin America from a variety of perspectives and in a comparative context. Students will acquire a broad knowledge of the history, geography, society, politics and culture of Latin America, exploring key periods and themes with an emphasis on contemporary issues. Prerequisites: None.
GS 101 GU INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES (4.00 credits)
This course presents interdisciplinary perspectives on key global issues with an emphasis on critical analysis, problem-solving, and an understanding of the interdependence of the world's peoples and cultures. It is designed as the introductory course for students minoring in Global Studies or for students with a personal or professional interest in global studies wanting to meet general education requirements. Prerequisites: None.
GS 211 LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN (4.00 credits)
This course is a survey of the key epochs, movements, and issues in the social history of Latin American women. With emphasis on the contemporary era, we will study their struggles and contributions, along with political, economic, and social factors impacting women’s lives. Also there will be analysis of the rich diversity of culture, class, race, and ethnicity.
GS 370 LONDON: THEATER AND ART HISTORY (2.00 credits)
This interdisciplinary, experiential course consists of two parts: GS 370 conducted in weekly meetings during the Fall semester and GS 371 2AG in London, England, during the Winterim term. This first part of the course will offer an introduction to the study of theater and art history, and to the social, cultural, and artistic history of London. Course participants will engage in readings and research relating to some aspect of our planned experience, and will present this research to the class. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. No online registration. Students must apply and be accepted into the course in order to be approved for registration. Students must successfully complete both GS 370 (Fall) and GS 371 (Winterim) in order to receive the 2, A and G tags for this sequence. (F, odd years; W, even years)
GS 370 2AG LONDON: THEATER AND ART HISTORY (2.00 credits)
The GS 370/371 sequence satisfies the 2, A, and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succesfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the 2, A, and G tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), Enroll in GS 370 at this time and GS 371 for the Winterim term (registration is also open now). The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of GS 371 in the Winterim term.
GS 371 2AG LONDON: THEATER AND ART HISTORY (2.00 credits)
The two-week study tour to London is a continuation of GS 370. It will provide the opportunity to study culture, theater, and art history in one of the world's premier cities for such study. While in London, course participants will experience historical, modern, and contemporary theater and art. Class sessions in London will be designed to enrich experiential learning through faculty and student presentations. Our itinerary will include plays, museums, and art galleries, coordinated when possible so that we will view art from the era of a play we will be seeing, whether historical or contemporary. We will also visit cultural sites in and around London that have been important historically for artists and playwrights. Free time for course participants to explore London and its surrounds on their own will round out the travel component of the course. Prerequisites: GS 370. No online registration. Students must apply and be accepted into the GS 370 course in order to be approved for registration. Students must successfully complete both GS 370 (Fall) and GS 371 (Winterim) in order to receive the 2, A and G tags for this sequence. (F, odd years; W, even years)
GS 350 2G LONG-TERM STUDY ABROAD: COR 2 (1.00 credits)
The GS 350/351 sequence satisfies the 2 and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succesfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the 2 and G tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in GS 350 at this time and GS 351 2G in Spring 2014. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of GS 351 2G in the Spring term.
GS 115 1G MANY MEXICOS (3.00 credits)
This course provides a cross-cultural exploration of the following questions: What conceptions and misconceptions do we have about our nearest neighbor? What shapes and influences our knowledge and perceptions about Mexico? What is the actual diversity present within Mexico? What does a more complex and nuanced understanding of Mexico illuminate about contemporary issues of global social justice? In depth explorations of race/ethnicity, economics and education in Mexico will provide cases through which students consider these questions. The course culminates with a student-selected inquiry project in which they identify the needs and opportunities of contemporary Mexico, along with our individual and collective roles in building a more just and compassionate global community. (F, odd years) Prerequisites: This course is for first semester freshmen or freshmen transfer students.
GS 235 AGQ WOMEN IN WORLD CINEMA (4.00 credits)
Women in World Cinema is a survey course introducing students to visual texts made by women filmmakers from around the world. The course will cover different genres from full-length features, to shorts, documentaries, and ethnographic representations. GS 235 and WS 235 will include representative works by important filmmakers such as Suzana Amaral from Brazil, Kathryn Bigelow from the US, Iciar Bollain from Spain, Jane Campion from New Zealand, Safi Faye from Senegal, Deepa Mehta from India, Sally Potter from England, Agnes Varda from France and Li Yu from China. Students will critically examine, analyze, and evaluate national and international women's cinema in terms of form and techniques (light, camera, sound, cinematography) as well as content (themes, genres, ideology). Prerequisites: None.

WS 362 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN HOMOPHOBIA (4.00 credits)
A study of the development of homophobia in the US during the last 20 years of the 19th century in response to that era's discovery of the "homosexual." Crosslisted with HIST 362. Prerequisites: HIST 132 or consent of instructor.
WS 415A CDQ BLACK WOMEN WRITERS (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected novels, short stories, and essays by African American women writers in the 20th and 21st centuries. Emphasizing the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity and black feminist criticism, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in black women's literature? What textual strategies do African American women writers employ to represent "blackness" and "femaleness?" In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant discourses of race, gender, class and sexuality? What does it mean to be a black feminist reader, and what does it mean for non-black and/or non-female readers to interpret black women's writings? Cross-listed with ENG 415A & ETHS 415A. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or a "W" tag course.
WS 104 PQU ETHICS OF SEX LOVE & MARRIAGE (4.00 credits)
This class examines various ethical theories about sex, love and marriage, with the goal of understanding and evaluating feminist and GLBT arguments about the worth of marriage as an institution. Prerequisites: PHIL 101.
WS 323 DJQ FAMILY AND SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
An examination of the institution of family through historical, cross-cultural and contemporary perspectives. Attention is given to family structure in US society and its interconnectedness with economic conditions, race and ethnic differentiations, religious beliefs, status expectations, gender ideologies, and legal definitions. Emphasis is on the history and politics of marriage and cohabitation, sexuality, changing notions of childhood and parenthood, dependent care, gender roles in the family, race and ethnic-based variations, and social policies that shape family life. Cross-listed with SOC 323. Prerequisites: None.
WS 325 JKQ GENDER, CULTURE, AND COMMUNICATION (3.00 credits)
In this course we will examine how gender is communicated within cultural and institutional settings (how we come to know what it is to be a woman or a man), the multiple ways humans communicate within and across gender lines (how we express ourselves as gendered individuals and why we do it many different ways), and the relationship of the two. We will also look at how feminists' theories illuminate gender issues in communication. Prerequisites: None.
WS 252 AQX HIST OF WOMEN ARTISTS: EUR & N AMER (4.00 credits)
This course offers an introduction to the lives and work of women in the visual arts in Europe and North America from the Renaissance to the present, with a focus on issues of gender, power, ideology, and representation that underlie the study of women artists and their work.  We will look at the work of specific European and North American women artists with attention to the historical circumstances in which they produced their art, ideologies of gender and art at these particular historical moments, and artists’ writings.  This course will also address themes explored by many women artists: the relationship between art and craft; spirituality; self-portraiture; the female body; motherhood; and heritage and identity. Along with reading scholarly texts about women artists and various writings by historic and contemporary women artists, throughout the semester students in this writing-enriched course will be expected to write informal responses to issues raised in this course, reflections on course readings and works of art considered in class, and a substantive formal research paper.  Cross-listed with WS 252 AQX.  Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
WS 479 INDP STDY: WOMEN'S & GENDER STUDIES (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Advanced work in the field of Women's and Gender Studies. Consent of the instructor required. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
WS 379 INDP STDY: WOMEN'S & GENDER STUDIES (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
WS 204 INTRO TO WOM&GENDER STUDIES: TOPICS (4.00 credits)
A series of topics courses in Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies. Prerequisites: None.
WS 204A CPQ INTRO WGS: LIT & PHILOSOPHY (4.00 credits)
This course will provide an interdisciplinary introduction to the issues and themes of women's and gender studies as revealed through the reading and analysis of literature and feminist and gender theory. We will take a philosophical approach to the issues we encounter and question our own assumptions along with those of the texts we read. Within our texts, we will examine social and cultural constructs in historical context, in contemporary society, and in our own lives. Using both fiction and nonfiction, we will examine this interplay between how we construct the "feminine" and the "masculine" in our psyches and how gender is constructed through the media and collective psyche. Additionally, in this course, students will have the unique opportunity to reflect upon, write about, and explore their own gender identities and its many influences. Prerequisites: None.
WS 204B CJQ INTRO WGS: LIT & SOC SCI (4.00 credits)
This course will provide an interdisciplinary introduction to the issues and themes of women’s and gender studies, through critical readings, reflection and analysis of literary works and sociological texts grounded in feminist and gender theory. We will examine cultural constructs of gender in historical context, in contemporary society, in literature, and in our own lives. Using works of fiction and nonfiction, we will examine this interplay between how we construct the “feminine” and the “masculine” in our psyches and how gender is constructed and transmitted in societies through cultural expressions such as literature. Additionally, in this course, students will have the unique opportunity to reflect upon, write about, and explore their own gender identities and its many influences.
WS 207 DJQ INTRODUCTION TO LGBTQ+ STUDIES (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to LGBTQ+ Studies. The plus-sign is included in recognition that LGBT does not include everyone marginalized for their gender or sexuality, e.g. intersex people, asexual/aromantic people, pansexual/panromantic people, etc. Language and identities are always evolving. We start from the position that taken-for-granted systems of categorization like gender and sexuality are in fact socially developed, enforced, and reproduced such that members of societies see them as “natural.” Note that this includes categories historically considered “biological” such as sex and race, which are also socially defined. Although these systems are embedded in particular societies and cultures, and thus may be described as “social constructs,” they are quite real to the people who are categorized by them, and who may actively work to reproduce, oppose, or transform them, as well as the personal identities that arise from them. Furthermore, these systems interact in various ways with other social categories such as socioeconomic class, ability, age, etc. Mainstream representation of LBGTQ+ individuals and the LGBTQ+ community overall tend to reinforce assumptions that the vast majority of LGBTQ+ people are white, middle-class, and abled, as well as being primarily cisgender men. This course therefore particularly emphasizes the central role in LGBTQ+ activism and communities that has been and continues to be played by transgendered people and people of color, along with other under severed groups such as asexual/aromantic people and bi/pan people, and multiply marginalized LGBTQ+ people in general. Throughout the semester, we will address the issues of intersecting oppressions and the matrix of domination raised by Black feminist theorists like Kimberlé Crenshaw and Patricia Hill Collins. We cannot understand how people are affected by gender and sexuality without understanding how they are also affected by other social categories. Transgender people of color experience the most severe negative outcomes in the LGBTQ+ community, although these experiences are something presented as representative of the community as a whole for rhetorical purposes, their needs and goals are rarely prioritized by mainstream scholarship and activism. Rather than restricting coverage of transgender people and people of color to limited units, this course includes materials on trans identity and race and ethnicity throughout the semester in order to present a more accurate and nuanced picture of who exactly “LGBTQ+ people” are, and the complexity of the issues that affect them. We also encourage you to bring up issues that we may nto have considered. We value criticism and feedback from students whose lived experiences give them insight that we lack, and we make an effort to incorporate it as fully and immediately as possible. Finally, introductory courses must cover a broad range of materials, and unfortunately often cannot delve into specific topics as deeply as we might like, but that doesn’t mean that they are easy. We want to see all students succeed in this course, but you will get out of this course what you are willing to put in.
WS 437 CGQ LITERARY MOVEMENTS OF MODERN FRANCE (4.00 credits)
Literary movements of Modern France is an upper-division French Literature class focusing on a specific literary trend or theme. Our topic for WS 437 is women writers, and to that end, we will study literary and critical texts by French women authors, learn about women's movements and feminist manifestos in France, and examine samples of "ecriture feminie." The goal of this course is two-fold. WS 437 is designed to develop (1) Student's knowledge of different narrative genres such as the journal, diary, letter, short story, and the literary autobiography through the study of literary texts and increase their ability to interpret literary works and (2) Student's understanding of the social, cultural, political and historical contexts in which women's literature from France was produced and experienced. Prerequisites: 4th semester French, appropriate language placement, or equivalent.
WS 206 PQU PHILOSOPHY AND GENDER (4.00 credits)
This course will introduce students to the main theoretical paradigms within feminist and gender theory. The course is centered on the following questions: What is gender? What constitutes gender oppression? Is gender oppression related to oppression based on race, sexuality and class? If so, how? What is gender identity? Are gender differences natural, psychological, social, or some combination of these? How, if at all, is it possible to combat and perhaps overcome oppression? Prerequisites: PHIL 101.
WS 389 2Q PSYCHOLOGY OF MEN AND MASCULINITIES (4.00 credits)
This course, through the multidisciplinary nature of topics discussed, allows for students to explore the ways in which they relate to men in their lives and in the world. It is intended that through engagement with community-based agencies that work with boys and men, we will develop a deeper understanding of the very complex ways boys and men are affected by the experiences of growing up male and having people respond to them as male. Through this integration of scholarly works, class discussion, and community involvement, the student will be fostered into becoming a more socially conscious and compassionate member of greater society. This service learning course expects that students participate in 1-2 hours weekly of community engagement outside of class. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
WS 480C QU SENIOR SEMINAR (4.00 credits)
This course examines current issues in Feminist Theory, which might include eco-feminisim, post-humanism, trans, queer theory, or other paradigms that arise as the field develops.
WS 480 GQU SENIOR SEMINAR: WOMEN & GENDER STD (4.00 credits)
What issues are important to women in different parts of the world? How do those issues relate to one another? What makes an issue "feminist" or not? How do we conceive of feminisms outside of our borders, whether those borders are geographic, political, or personal? What strategies can we employ to understand women's lives and concerns in different cultures, locations, and times? Is it possible to actively support feminist causes across the globe without imposing dangerous sets of limiting assumptions? This course is an exploration of the methods, concepts, and experiences of feminism as it is practiced all over the world in different ways. The historical development and cultural mappings of feminism since the second wave will be our main concern, but we will maintain specificity by focusing on particular locations, and on locational concerns. Three large units will make up the course: feminism and race at the end of the second wave and into the present; postcolonial critiques of feminism and issues of religion, rights, and class in various locations throughout the world; and transnational approaches to feminist identity, politics and possibilities. Throughout our explorations of contemporary feminisms, we will interrogate how our own lives and choices affect the lives of women around the world, in part by investigating the origins of products we purchase regularly. Feminist theorists from a variety of disciplines including philosophy, literature, political science, history and sociology will provide groundwork for our explorations, which will be filled out through case studies, historical texts and literary narratives. Cross-listed with ENG 480A and ETHS 481 Prerequisites: ENG 110 and ENG 280.
WS 360 THE HISTORY OF WOMEN IN NORTH AMERI (4.00 credits)
Women in North America and the United States from 1500 to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding how & why ideas about femininity and masculinity have changed over time. Crosslisted with HIST 360. Prerequisites: None.
WS 224 CQX TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND GENDER (4.00 credits)
Because literature has long had a special capacity to evoke and reflect on complex social issues, some of the deepest thinking about gender and sexual identities has emerged in literary representations. Mainstream social discussions about these issues have often followed later. Each period and cutlural context has its own way of thinking about gender identity, divisions between men and women, and ways of thinking about sexual identity in relation to gender. While much of canonical literature evokes these themes, scholars have been somewhat slow at times in addressing them for a variety of reasons. Courses under this topic heading seek to both uncover these themes in the traditional canon and to examine more generally how literary depictions of gender in fiction from the past help us to understand how ideas about such issues developed over time. Depictions of gender in contemporary fiction can help us think about where discussions are moving in the future. Possible iterations of the course might focus on; feminism in literature, masculinity in hard-boiled detective fiction, transgender memoirs, or gender and power. Prerequisite: ENG 110. (F)
WS 344 DQR WOMEN & MULTICULTURAL THEOLOGIES (4.00 credits)
How do women theologians from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds understand and discuss God, Jesus, Human Beings, the Bible, Spirituality, Ecology and the Roles of Women in religion and society today? How do North American women “do theology” in their African-American, Latina, Native American, Asian-American, Euro-American and/or socio-economic contexts?  What kinds of theology are women theologians in Latin America, Asia and Africa doing?  In what ways do race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and nation shape the formation and development of Christian feminist theologies? From multicultural perspectives, this course explores the questions, experiences, values, concerns, and challenges that women bring to the understanding and practice of Christian faith and its implications for building a more just and compassionate world. Prerequisites: I-, T-, and W- tags or their equivalents. Cross-listed with ETHS 344 DQR and RS 344
WS 343 WOMEN AND RELIGION (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
Explores women's issues in a variety of religious traditions from a feminist perspective including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Native American, Eastern traditions and goddess religion. Autobiography, feminist interpretation of scripture and expressions of women's spirituality are included. Crosslisted with RS 343. Prerequisites: One WS or RS F8 course.
WS 365 JQ WOMEN AND SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
An assessment of women's position in American society and a consideration of gender ideology and its impact on women's participation in major institutions. Prerequisites: None.
WS 258 QX WOMEN IN MUS: WRITING NEXT CHP: HNR (4.00 credits)
Women in Music: Writing the Next Chapter is a course for serious writers who wish to gain insight on writing and publishing while simultaneously exploring documentation of women in music and culture. Using Women, Music, Culture: An Introduction as a basis through which to view the writing, editing, and publication process, class members will research and create new material for the course website and for a new edition. This will include written material, graphics, and photographs. Prerequisite: W tag or ENG 110 and consent of instructor via writing sample.
WS 158 AQX WOMEN IN MUSIC (4.00 credits)
An examination of the role of women in music in a wide array of genres, ranging from art music to rock and blues, with focus on social construction of gendered roles in music. Students will write a research paper on a topic of interest to them. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
WS 235 AGQ WOMEN IN WORLD CINEMA (4.00 credits)
Women in World Cinema is a survey course introducing students to visual texts made by women filmmakers from around the world. The course will cover different genres from full-length features, to shorts, documentaries, and ethnographic representations. GS 235 and WS 235 will include representative works by important filmmakers such as Suzana Amaral from Brazil, Kathryn Bigelow from the US, Iciar Bollain from Spain, Jane Campion from New Zealand, Safi Faye from Senegal, Deepa Mehta from India, Sally Potter from England, Agnes Varda from France and Li Yu from China. Students will critically examine, analyze, and evaluate national and international women's cinema in terms of form and techniques (light, camera, sound, cinematography) as well as content (themes, genres, ideology). Prerequisites: None.
WS 215 CQX WOMEN WRITERS (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the work of women writers from a variety of literary genres and periods. The course will also teach fundamentals of literary interpretation. In this class, we will be reading conventional autobiographies, memoirs, autobiographical fiction, journals and a graphic novel. Cross-listed ENG 215. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
WS 490 WOMEN'S & GENDER STUDIES INTERNSHIP (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Faculty supervised experiential learning in a community setting relevant to women's and gender studies. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

COR 312 2 BEYOND BIRTH: MENTAL/EMOTIONAL (3.00 credits)
This interdisciplinary course will delve into the mental/emotional side of birth support drawing on scientific and medical research, and the disciplines of Psychology, Theology, and Sociology. Students will examine the merits and critiques of the dominant medical model, and gain insights from an experienced childbirth educator and birth doula, as well as a variety of birth support professionals and programs in the broader community. Tools to help laboring women remain centered and focused and able to activate their parasympathetic nervous system for gentler birth outcomes will be explored. Students will also personally gain specific tools for realization and focus, as well as an understanding of how these can be of benefit in the birthing process. Recognizing that people come from a variety of experiences with birth, we will also explore the many racial, socio-economic and cultural factors involved. As part of the process, students will be invited to explore their own identity in a deeper way and how that relates to supporting other in connection with the three organizing COR questions.
COR 295 2 CARING FOR OURSELVES, THE WORLD (3.00 credits)
This COR 2 seminar has been designed as an opportunity to explore the connections between our life work as helping professionals, development as leaders in these careers, and building resilience through self-care and mindfulness. Using the lens of the COR 2 essential questions (Who am I and who could I become? What are the needs and opportunities of the world? What is my role in building a just and compassionate world?), the class will pose such questions as, What are the relationships between self and community, and between personal activities and public service? What responsibilities exist in these relationships? How do social forces (e.g., poverty, racism, and sexism) shape these roles and inform one's responsibilities? Through reading, discussion, and service activities, students will reflect upon community experiences, how these experiences influence their personal and public worlds, and their personal values in relation to these spheres, while identifying and examining their own value systems as they are situated in the values systems of other contexts, including those of their service sites and the Dominican tradition. Class members must have a concurrent field placement within their majors, and content will be based in part of the experiences of students in these placements. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers; concurrent field placement within major.
COR 253 2 COMM CHNG THRU REFLECTION & ACTION (3.00 credits)
This course allows students to explore community change questions such as how groups work collectively to encourage change, create a collective vision, build relationships, sustain energy over time, address barriers and celebrate successes. Students will learn about institutional and community-based approaches to change. They will examine the cultural assumptions and community identity underlying change efforts. Participation in a day-long community-based experience required in addition to class time. Prerequisites:  COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
COR 250 2D CONVERSATIONS IN RACE AND DIVERSITY (3.00 credits)
This course is a salon-style forum for students to unpack and explore the many dimensions of race in society and the ongoing challenges of building inclusive communities. Students will have sustained, direct, relevant and in-depth conversations with racial justice activists, individuals and organizations doing inclusive community organizing, social issue advocates, and people working on inclusive reforms in government, education, business and industry, media and other civic groups.  This course has expectations for outside of class community engagement. Prerequisites:  COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
COR 306 2X CONVICT CHRNICLS: PRISON WRITNG/ART (3.00 credits)
It isn't called "doing time" for nothing. As the hours and unrelenting sameness of routines press in on incarcerated men and women, some struggle, often in isolation, with fundamental questions: Who am I and who could I become? Why am I here? Can I be forgiven? How can I forgive myself? What are the needs and opportunities of the world - this world and that world? What is my role in building a just and compassionate world? The search for answers to these questions is often addressed through writing. Students would also explore prisoner art and music/spoken word and raw - other expressions of story. Prerequisite: COR 1.
COR 115 1Q GENDER & THE MEDICAL PROFESSIONS (3.00 credits)
This course examines the history and current trends in health-related professions as they relate to the gender distribution of practitioners. These fields include medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and pharmacy, as well as the relatively newer professions such as physical therapist and physician assistant. We will study the interaction of societal gender roles with career selection and the experiences of professionals within health fields, especially experiences of discouragement and discrimination. We will reflect on the results of our studies and propose actions that you take in determining your career path.
COR 106 1Q GENDER AND LIBERATION (3.00 credits)
This course examines the relationship of gender, and our assumptions about gender, to both individual freedom and broad notions of civil and human rights. We will use popular culture, research based in Sociology, and autobiographical writing to explore gender socialization in the context of social movements of the past 150 years: women’s suffrage, second wave feminism, gay liberation, and marriage equality. This course also addresses the intersection of discrimination based on gender with other forms of discrimination, and considers ways in which people have resisted the resulting oppression. Prerequisite: First year students only.
COR 108 1D GLOBAL CHANGES, LOCAL LIVES (3.00 credits)
This course is designed to develop understanding of the global forces that shape communities, our lives within our communities, and our choices about how we as individuals live. Within a multicultural and interdisciplinary framework, we will use concepts from sociology as well as Dominican values to explore and evaluate the impact of globally driven trends such as human migration, extractive mining, and industrial decline. We will meet with local people affected by global economic change, visit relevant sites in the community, and write the stories of ourselves and our communities. Prerequisite: First year students only
COR 105 1K HUMOR: ALWAYS A LAUGHING MATTER? (3.00 credits)
We will look at the verbal and nonverbal symbols used in humor from a variety of perspectives. You will have a chance to share the humor you enjoy and speculate on how it reflects your identity. We'll also take a broader societal and historical view of humor. Has our understanding of humor evolved through the history of western civilization? Has it always been just entertainment or has it played a role in interpersonal relations, health, commerce, politics and /or as a reflection of culture? Can we detect ways in which the use of humor might be adapted for the betterment of self and society? This course requires at least one off-campus field trip on a weekend. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in COMMS 100; this course is for first semester freshmen or freshmen transfer students.
COR 255 2 INTEGRATN DISABILTY&ENGAGED CITIZNS (3.00 credits)
This course will give students the ability to be a part of the only program in Wisconsin serving adults with more severe disabilities in higher education. While they learn more about disability in our society and the barriers this population confronts in our community, they will be serving to help them overcome these same barriers. Through a unique collaborative relationship with individuals with severe disabilities, students will be involved in a totally integrated, service learning project of their choosing on and off the Edgewood college campus. Undergraduate students will be paired with Cutting Edge students with like interests and together they will explore becoming engaged citizens. Both will learn and grow while reflecting on the nature of volunteerism and the as powerful change and growth experience in their lives. This class has expectations for outside of class community engagement. Prerequisites:  COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
COR 111 1P JUSTICE&COMPASSION FOR ANIMALS (4.00 credits)
Nonhuman animals, in particular mammals, have the same emotions in humans as they possess the same brain chemicals, structures, and pathways as humans; the difference is one of degree, not kind. These emotions include empathy, compassion, anger, love, joy, and awe. Studying the evidence for these emotions across species reveals the evolutionary continuity that has led to the nature of our own inner lives. This revelation leads to a different quality of understanding of who we are in the context of sentient beings and morally challenges us to reassess our relationships with nonhuman animals. As we research the disconnect between the prevailing attitudes toward and treatments of our fellow sentient beings, we are offered compelling reasons to create more just and compassionate lives for those with whom we share this Earth. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in a "T" tagged course is required.
COR 110 1P LIBERAL ARTS IN DOMINICAN TRADITION (4.00 credits)
Can education combat evil? Did St. Augustine help write The Matrix? Is it true that the more you learn, the less you know? Who knew these questions relate to the liberal arts, which are one of the oldest and most influential institutions in the human experience? In this course, we examine different conceptions and applications of the liberal arts across the Western Tradition, including leadership in public life, the problem of evil, specialization and professionalism, and Edgewood’s own tradition of liberal arts, using original texts including those from Cicero, St. Augustine, Francis Bacon, John Dewey, and more. Beyond the classroom, we talk philosophy around a bonfire, discuss leadership in the halls of the state Capitol, ask mentors about the problem of evil, and discuss hopes and dreams at a “salon.” Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHIL 101 T is required.
COR 251 LIFETIME LEGACIES: LIFE REVIEW I (2.00 credits)
We will study how people deal with profound changes in their lives, examining how they heal their wounds and who can help in the process. We investigate dying, death and ethical end-of-life issues. We read and hear life stories, challenges and/or stigma faced by individuals who are disabled, homeless, in prison, physically and/or mentally abused, or recovering from trauma. In addition to conversations with in-class speakers, we visit places and see, first hand, how individuals and agencies cope with challenges and opportunities associated with significant loss and change. The COR 251/351 sequence satisfies the 2 tag. To receive this tag, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the 2 tag for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in COR 251 at this time and COR 351 for the next Spring term. The tag will be added to your record after successful completion of the COR 351 in the next Spring term.
COR 251 2 LIFETIME LEGACIES: LIFE REVIEW I (2.00 credits)
We will study how people deal with profound changes in their lives, examining how they heal their wounds and who can help in the process. We investigate dying, death and ethical end-of-life issues. We read and hear life stories, challenges and/or stigma faced by individuals who are disabled, homeless, in prison, physically and/or mentally abused, or recovering from trauma. In addition to conversations with in-class speakers, we visit places and see, first hand, how individuals and agencies cope with challenges and opportunities associated with significant loss and change. The COR 251/351 sequence satisfies the 2 tag. To receive this tag, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the 2 tag for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in COR 251 at this time and COR 351 for the next Spring term. The tag will be added to your record after successful completion of the COR 351 in the next Spring term.
COR 351 2 LIFETIME LEGACIES: LIFE REVIEW II (2.00 credits)
This course is the second part of a two-part sequence that focuses on how people deal with profound change in their lives. We look at dying,death and bereavement. We look at variations in physical and mental capacity for people of all ages. We explore challenges and/or stigma faced by individuals (and their families/friends) who are homeless, in prison, dependent on alcohol, etc. In addition to conversations with in-class speakers, we visit many places and see, first hand, how individuals and agencies cope with challenges (and opportunities) associated with significant loss and change. In this, the second semester, students will prepare their own life reviews, after having worked with another person to tell her or his life story. Prerequisite: COR 1or equivalent and COR 251; open to second or third year students or sophomores and above transfers. Note: Both COR 251 and COR 351 must be successfully completed in order to earn the COR 2 tag.
COR 320 2 MADISON AS TEXT (4.00 credits)
This research-intensive course is an opportunity to utilize site-based experiential inquiry to formulate an understanding of places and issues. Students will be introduced to the City as Text™ methodology for mapping "place.". Course readings, student-civic interactions, informal and formal presentations, written assignments, and reflection assignments are designed to familiarize students with and encourage synthesis of multiple modes of research and evidence-gathering techniques. Students will observe and understand both formal and informal interactions, urban design and architecture, social services, social intervention and service organizations as relevant to understanding a place. As a COR 2 course, COR 320 also presents students with opportunities to analyze their own lenses on place and skills for reporting on place.
COR 252 2 MADISON: A MODEL CITY (3.00 credits)
This course will explore current local issues and how they affect the lives of all of us living in South-central Wisconsin. Possible issues include jobs, schools, safety, politics and kids, as well as new urban living, sustainable agriculture and food policies, the environment and green economy, and civic engagement and public life. Students will meet with community leaders at various sites throughout the Madison area. Prerequisites:  COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
COR 316 2 MENTORING THROUGH MEDIA ARTS (3.00 credits)
Students in this course will learn about issues faced by young people growing up in an economically marginalized community, and gain experience mentoring young people through media arts such as photojournalism and video. Through pairings with Boys and Girls Club participants, students will build relationships with youth and assist as young people develop skill in using media for self-expression. Mentoring experiences are informed by and integrated with reading on motovating urban youth and other class materials, and provide a foundation from which to learn about the challenges faced by youth, parents and other community members where basic resources are lacking.
COR 304 2X PERFORMING SOCIAL JUSTICE (4.00 credits)
In this class students deepen their understandings of and capacity for pursuing social justice through performative approaches, with the goal of crafting and carrying out innovative and effective social action. This class brings study and reflection to action. Students begin the semester with small performative action projects, supported by reading, writing, and discussion, as they learn about human issues, histories of structural inequalities, activist theater, and how critical social theory relates to justice activism. The class devotes some of that time to clarifying students' passions and values, trying out innovative approaches to social issues and honing the critical skills necessary to create do-able and meaningful work in the second half of the course. This class has expectations for outside of class community engagement. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers; ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
COR 254 2 RESTOR COMM:INTRO TO RESTOR JUSTICE (3.00 credits)
Students will learn about concepts of restorative justice such as the three dimensions of harm when a crime is committed and the peacemaking circle as a tool to transform brokenness into a place of healing. They will learn how to create consensus, build community, incorporate the process into a community-based setting, and create positive environments and the means to build community. This class has expectations for outside of class community engagement. . Prerequisites:  COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
COR 380 2CD SEMINAR: IMMIGRANT NARRATIVES (4.00 credits)
An integrative seminar in ethnic studies, literary studies, and community-based learning, this course investigates, through multidisciplinary lenses, the issues of migration, border, and identities in the United States in the 20th and 21st centuries. Focusing on immigrant narratives of various genres, such as fiction, film, autobiography, and oral narrative, by women and men of diverse ethnic and racial ancestries, and integrating classroom inquiry and community engagement, we will explore the following questions: What are the major themes and issues in immigrant narratives? What does it mean to cross borders, and what motivates and causes border crossings? What are the possibilities and problems of border crossings? In what ways do immigrant and diasporic subjects challenge or negotiate boundaries that seek to oppress, exclude or constrain? How do the forces of race, ethnicity, gender and class intersect in the construction of immigrant or diasporic identities? In what ways do immigrant narratives challenge or accommodate the US national discourse of immigrant integration and progress? How does the study of migration, border, and identities shape our understanding of our own histories and identity constructions? What is our role in building communities committed to cultural pluralism and social justice? Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers; ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
COR 340 SHORT TERM STUDY ABROAD I (2.00 credits)
This class poses questions about students' sense of self in relation to the world, about ethical issues and the needs and opportunities of the world and about what it means to take a role in building a just and compassionate world. Questions fundamental to this course are: What is the role that certain social events and worldviews have in the process of individual and collective identity development, historically and in our time? What is the impact of meaningful cross-cultural experience and community engagement on one's sense of self? In what ways can relationships with communities in and/or outside the United States promote the building of a just and compassionate world? In what ways could I engage in a meaningful way with the process of building a just and compassionate world? This, the first part of the course, will consist of pre-departure readings, discussions, debates, and planning, followed by a short-term trip abroad of about 1 to 4 weeks. Prerequisite: COR 1 and sophomore standing.
COR 341 2G SHORT TERM STUDY ABROAD II (2.00 credits)
This class poses questions about students' sense of self in relation to the world, about ethical issues and the needs and opportunities of the world and about what it means to take a role in building a just and compassionate world. Questions fundamental to this course are: What is the role that certain social events and worldviews have in the process of individual and collective identity development, historically and in our time? What is the impact of meaningful cross-cultural experience and community engagement on one's sense of self? In what ways can relationships with communities in and/or outside the United States promote the building of a just and compassionate world? In what ways could I engage in a meaningful way with the process of building a just and compassionate world? This, the second part of the course, will bring the students together again as a group to reflect on their experiences. The final product for this course will be as individualized as the travel experiences and will be agreed upon between the student and lead faculty. Prerequisite: COR 1 and sophomore standing.
COR 113 1Q SOCIAL JUSTICE THRU HOLLYWOOD LENS (4.00 credits)
This interdisciplinary course explores the intersection of gender and social justice issues through media platforms, particularly Hollywood cinema and the creation and mediation of identity in film. Students will examine the social construction of masculinity and femininity as these have developed over time in films such as Norma Rae, Silkwood, Erin Brockovich, Boys Don't Cry, and Thelma and Louise, with a lens informed by gender theory and feminist film criticism. The course also examines the influence of Hollywood with regard to gender socializiation and socialization around social justice issues, themes students will analyze in terms of theor own experiences, identities, values, and beliefs. Both film analysis and reflection will highlight the intersectionality of identity, especially as if forms relationships to structures of power, priviledge and oppression. Prerequisite: First year students only. (S)
COR 114 1G STORIES LOOK BENEATH THE SURFACE (4.00 credits)
Literature—of all kinds—is a great tool for thinking about ourselves in relation to others. This course will explore a variety of representations of the human condition and human existence. We will be reading and discussing a selection of literary and socially relevant texts from around the world, including at least one play that we also see performed. Our goal is to create a framework of thinking so we can discuss, and improve our ability to understand various messages and themes that are reflected in our lice. In this process, we will aim to increase self-awareness, in the context of the conditions and needs of the world today.
COR 210 2 TCH WRITING 1 ON 1: ENG 110 TUTORNG (2.00 credits)
Students will read and analyze the history, philosophy, and practical aspects of writing tutoring and the teaching of composition, while working as the "in house" tutor for a section of English 110. Focus of the readings will be on first-year and "novice" students in particular, exploring issues of culture, identity, language, and discourse. Students will learn techniques for effective written commenting and paper conference techniques, produce session reports on their work with their students, conduct an interview with a first-year student, and do a self-reflection project as their final exam. Students will have the option of conducting a field research project that will carry over into the following semester. Students will do two to four hours a week of tutoring and/or attending their English 110 class sessions over the semester. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and previous tutoring experience. (F)
COR 199 TRANSFER BRIDGE TO COR (0.00 credits)
This course is a 2.5 hour session that satisfies the COR 1 general education requirement for transfer students with at least sophomore standing, and those students for which the requirement is waived due to life experience, including military service. Bridge curriculum addresses an introduction to Edgewood's Dominican tradition, an opportunity to reflect on the COR questions, and a community engagement experience. Prerequisite: Transfer student with sophomore standing or above, or a waiver from the COR program. (F/S)
COR 101 1 UNDRSTDG WI CLTR OF ALC USE & ABUSE (3.00 credits)
Alcohol 101 provides an opportunity to: (1) explore personal beliefs and values around alcohol use and (2) understand connections to the unique Wisconsin alcohol culture. Areas of exploration include: study the Wisconsin cultural perspectives on alcohol use; study the biological impacts of alcohol use; reflect on personal, family and community experiences of alcohol use and abuse; and act through making deliberate, conscious personal choices on alcohol use. In this class you should expect to participate in several excursions into the community outside of, and in addition to, class time (primarily nights and weekends). Transportation is arranged. Prerequisites: This course is for first semester freshmen or freshmen transfer students.
COR 103 1 UNDRSTND&ADVOC 4 INDIV WITH DISABIL (3.00 credits)
This course is designed to enrich students' understanding and appreciation of students with cognitive disabilities (Learning Disability, Down Syndrome, ADHD, Mental Illness, Autism Spectrum, etc.). The course will provide an overview of the thirteen categories of disability with the focus on the disabilities most identified in a college setting. We will explore students' identification and understanding of the disabilities, their perceptions/misperceptions of people with a disability, their beliefs, values and personal feelings regarding the rights of people with disabilities, and their role in building a more just and compassionate world by advocating for people with a disability in their classrooms, dorm and community at large. This course requires mentoring a college student from the Cutting Edge Program outside of class time. Prerequisites: This course is for first semester freshmen or freshmen transfer students.