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PHIL 101 T LOGIC: PRACTICE OF CRIT THINKING (3.00 credits)
Learn how to develop and strengthen your ability to identify, evaluate and construct arguments. Cultivate a critical thinking practice through the process of Socratic questioning in a learning community. Understand the value of multiple perspectives in critical thinking as a dialogical process necessary for building a just and humane society. Prerequisites: None.
PHIL 101A PT CRIT THNKNG FOR DELIBERATIVE DEMOC (3.00 credits)
A study of deliberative democratic theory with a special emphasis on the duties of citizens to deliberate and think critically about public policy. Prerequisites: None.
PHIL 101B PT CRITICAL THINKING & POPULAR CULTURE (3.00 credits)
In this course we will develop and strengthen skills required to identify, construct and evaluate arguments. We will investigate the nature of evidence and logical relations between claims. We will cultivate and internalize standards of critical thinking practice and build an understanding and appreciation for open-minded, ongoing dialogue that seeks truth. These goals will be incorporated into a critical examination of popular culture. We will seek to understand what is popular culture, how it influences us in how we view ourselves and others. We will evaluate the forces that shape popular culture, and our critical, and non-critical, responses to those forces. Prerequisites: None.
PHIL 101C 1T CRIT THNK: PHIL, POLITICS&PROPGANDA (4.00 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the philosophical methodology of critical thinking and argument analysis and will seek to apply this methodology by analyzing the ways in which political and media powers attempt to shape and inform our ideas about contemporary political issues. Through this analysis, students will attempt to answer three questions: How are my own beliefs and values about political issues shaped and influenced by politics and media? How can we use our critical faculties to sift through political spin and propaganda to arrive at better understanding about the problems that beset our country? And to what extent can we work to change our political and media systems to overcome these forces and create a more just and fair world?
PHIL 102 PU FOUNDATIONS IN PHILOSOPHY (3.00 credits)
In this course, students will gain a greater awareness of the conversation that surrounds some of the most important questions of fact and value that have puzzled and continue to puzzle humankind, questions like: Is there a god, do we survive death, and does morality have a basis in fact? Students will also be asked to contribute something to this conversation: something that is well thought out, reasonably coherent, responsive to what others have said, and reflective of their most authentic selves. Students will be given the tools to do this through an extended discussion of the principles of critical thinking and the philosophical method that they were first exposed to in PHIL 101. Prerequisites: PHIL 101 T.
PHIL 103 P PHILOSOPHY OF THE PERSON (3.00 credits)
Who am I and what could I become? What is a person? Are we more than biological organisms behaving according to laws of evolution? Are we born persons or do we become persons? What is soul? What is meaning in life, and where can we find (or create) it? And finally, what does it mean to seek "happiness"? This course has as its purpose the philosophical exploration of these and other questions on the nature of personhood. Prerequisites: None.
PHIL 104 P ETHICS (3.00 credits)
This class examines various ethical theories and issues from multiple perspectives with the goal of discerning guidelines for individual human action and for the attainment of the good in human life. Prerequisites: PHIL 101: Critical Thinking.
PHIL 104A PQU ETHICS OF SEX LOVE AND MARRIAGE (4.00 credits)
This class examines various ethical theories about sex, love and marriage, with the goal of understanding and evaluating feminist and GLBT arguments about the worth of marriage as an institution. Prerequisites: PHIL 101.
PHIL 105 PU SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3.00 credits)
In this course, students will gain a basic understanding of some of the major social and political philosophies, including liberalism, conservatism, communitarianism, feminism, environmentalism, and cosmopolitanism. Students will also be asked to make some tentative steps towards developing their own social and political philosophy: a philosophy that is well thought out, reasonably coherent, consistent with the facts, responsive to what others have said, and reflective of their genuine points of view. Students will be given the tools to do this through an extended discussion of the principles of critical thinking and the philosophical method that they were first exposed to in PHIL 101. Prerequisites: PHIL 101 T.
PHIL 106 PQU PHILOSOPHY AND GENDER (4.00 credits)
This course will introduce students to the main theoretical paradigms within feminist and gender theory. The course is centered on the following questions: What is gender? What constitutes gender oppression? Is gender oppression related to oppression based on race, sexuality and class? If so, how? What is gender identity? Are gender differences natural, psychological, social, or some combination of these? How, if at all, is it possible to combat and perhaps overcome oppression? Prerequisites: PHIL 101.
PHIL 108 PU SCIENCE, RELIGION & PHILOSOPHY (3.00 credits)
An exploration into the historical, cultural, ethical and philosophical relationships between religious traditions and the rise of Modern science. We will investigate these relationships as they have impacted: culturally shaped ways of knowing; changing worldviews about God, humanity and nature; methods of scientific, religious and philosophical inquiry; views on authority; and particular issues such as creation, evolution and intelligent design, the mind-brain problem, and life after death. Prerequisites: Philosophy 101
PHIL 109 GP HUMAN RIGHTS: THE GLOBAL STRUGGLE (4.00 credits)
A shared inquiry into the philosophy, history and global struggles pertaining to human rights. Prerequisites: Critical Thinking.
PHIL 110 EPU ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (3.00 credits)
What ways of thinking help us participate responsibly in the web of life on Earth? This course will help us recognize the interdependence of human society and the natural environment and the ways in which principles of ecological sustainability are essential to building a just and compassionate world. Our course will begin with developing an understanding of the multidisciplinary context of environmental ethics, and then we will explore fundamental worldviews of our relationship with and responsibility to the natural world. We will then look at specific areas of concern and case studies where you will be given the chance to examine an issue from different philosophical perspectives. This course will develop your ability to think philosophically; to understand several philosophical traditions in ethics; and to apply your abilities and understandings to environmental issues. Cross-listed with ENVS 110. Prerequisites: T tag course.
PHIL 117 EAGLES DEBATE TEAM (1.00 - 2.00 credits)
In this course students will participate in the activities of the Eagles Debate Team. These activities will include participation in weekly debates, critiquing debates, delivery exercises, scrimmages with regional teams, debate tournaments, on-campus workshops, and team building events. Prerequisites: none.
PHIL 230 DPU PHILOSOPHY AND RACE (4.00 credits)
This course will examine philosophical analyses of race, considering a range of views from race as a biological feature of individuals to race as a social construction and hence a political issue. We will consider whether (and how) notions of race relate to practices of racism, asking both ethical questions (how should people of different races be viewed and treated?) and metaphysical questions (what IS race?). Would a just world be one which has gotten “beyond” race, or would that ideal perpetuate a dangerous desire for sameness?
PHIL 250 PV HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (3.00 credits)
History and Philosophy of Science is an introduction to the nature of scientific knowledge, the philosophical implications of science, and the development of science as we know it today, along with some of the processes and products of scientific inquiry. In addition, the course addresses the history of science through the study of notable scientific revolutions and the exploration of the natural world as a human activity. The goals of the course include: introducing students to philosophical ways of thinking and arguing within the natural sciences and student development of an appreciation of the scientific enterprise. Cross-listed with NATS 250. Prerequisites: PHIL 101 or consent of instructor.
PHIL 255 CPU MORTALITY & THE LIMITS OF KNOWLEDGE (4.00 credits)
This course will track some major veins of thought through philosophical and literary lenses to show how engagement with the question of death as a metaphor for the confrontation with the limits of knowledge has proceeded through philosophical inquiry and literary figurations. Prerequisites: ENG 110, PHIL 101. (F)
PHIL 260 U SYMBOLIC LOGIC (3.00 credits)
This course will introduce students to the formal system of symbolic logic. Students in this course will learn the symbolic language of sentential and first-order predicate logic as well as how to demonstrate valid inferential reasoning via various methods such as truth-tables and natural deduction.
PHIL 265 PU MODERN PHILOSOPHY (3.00 credits)
This course explores issues that arise in Modern Philosophy such as empiricism and rationalism, the rise of scientific method, and political beliefs founded on reason and individual freedom.
PHIL 305 PHILOSOPHICAL THEMES (2.00 - 3.00 credits)
Exploration of various philosophical topics. Topics have included the human use of leisure and work, technology, mass media and the arts, as well as cross-cultural philosophical issues. Prerequisites: PHIL 101.
PHIL 305A GP SPC TPC: COSMOPOLITANISM (3.00 credits)
Cosmopolitanism is the belief that all human beings are members of one, big global community. The idea is that if we are united based on our common humanity, we will be able to rise above the differences that often divide us. In this class, we will ask whether cosmopolitanism can in practice offer the solutions that it hopes to offer: can we human beings be united in something like a global community? Should we want to be? What would we gain and potentially lose if we did so? In order to address these questions, we will consider issues with global import, which might include cultural difference, the war on terror and the notion of universal human rights. Prerequisites: None.
PHIL 306 GP PHILOSOPHY OF PEACE WITH JUSTICE (4.00 credits)
Philosophy of Peace explores 5 key philosophies; the Just War theory, nationalism, Ghandian Active Nonviolence, "Holy War", and global governance and the UN. The course normally includes a service-learning project and a travel seminar to NYC to visit the UN and various peace organizations. Prerequisites: PHIL 101.
PHIL 307 2DP THE PHIL OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. (4.00 credits)
This course is a shared inquiry into the nonviolent philosophy of M.L. King and its relevance both in the Civil Rights movement and in diverse communities in the U.S. and beyond. Students will study and discuss Dr. King's writings, reflect on their own potential for helping build the "Beloved Community," and engage in relevant service learning projects such as Amnesty International, the United Nations Association, and Fair Trade Advocacy. If funds are available, we may travel to the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis. Cross-listed with ETHS 480C. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers; completion of the T tag or concurrent enrollment in a T tag course.
PHIL 315 PU ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (3.00 credits)
The Western intellectual tradition has its roots in Ancient Greek Philosophy. This course will explore those roots through the philosophical themes that arose at the time and that provide the foundation for contemporary inquiry. Themes to be explored would include: metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, and logic. Prerequisite: PHIL 101.
PHIL 400 METAPHYSICS (3.00 credits)
Consideration of questions concerning ultimate reality and the purpose of existence. Perspectives from various eras, cultures and philosophical traditions will be examined. Prerequisites: PHIL 101 and one foundation course.
PHIL 401 SELECTED PHILOSOPHERS (2.00 - 3.00 credits)
In-depth concentration on one, two, or several philosophers, selected in response to student interest. Prerequisites: PHIL 101 and one foundation course.
PHIL 442 PU HEALTH CARE ETHICS (4.00 credits)
This course examines various important ethical issues in medical practice and health care while exploring some philosophical approaches to moral responsibility. Major areas of focus include ethics in clinical medicine, public health, and the intersection of health ethics with global justice. This course has the goals of familiarizing students with some important issues in health care ethics as well as fostering independent critical thinking and writing on these topics. Prerequisites: Completion of T,O, and W tags and at least sophomore status.
PHIL 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - PHILOSOPHY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Research into a philosophical theme related to a students' major field. Required of philosophy minors. (Prerequisite: PHIL 101) Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
PHIL 604 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (3.00 credits)
The goal of this course is to deepen critical thinking about ethical issues that arise in the context of professional practice. The course explores a wide variety of ethical issues relevant across professions. It aims to enhance students’ abilities to identify central ethical considerations, accurately and respectfully explain others’ views, thoughtfully examine one’s own views, critically evaluate the strength of reasoning, and present well-reasoned positions.
PHIL 642 ETHICS FOR HEALTH LEADERS (3.00 credits)
This course focuses on ethical issues in professions related to health care while exploring some philosophical approaches to moral responsibility. It is aimed at students pursuing a graduate degree in health systems leadership as well as other health care professions. Major areas of exploration include ethics in clinical medicine, public health, and the intersection of health ethics with global justice. Course goals include familiarizing students with some important ethical issues in health care, enhancing students’ abilities to analyze and evaluate ethical issues, and fostering critical thinking and communication skills.