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RS 101 1ER SPIRITUALITY & ECOLOGY (4.00 credits)
While focusing on Eco-Spirituality and Environmental Justice, this COR 1 course introduces the Dominican Liberal Arts tradition: building a more just and compassionate world through the integration of spirituality, study and service, in a community searching for truth. Through grappling with ecological concerns, students discover connections between their own spiritualities and what they are learning about the environment through various disciplines and their active collaboration in making the world a better place. We join Dominicans and others exploring "Is there a way to reverse global warming?" "Who suffers or benefits most from the way things are?" "What is 'green' living?" "What will motivate & empower us to reduce our own carbon footprints?"  Prerequisites: This course is for first semester freshmen or freshmen transfer students. Cross-listed with ENVS 101 1ER
RS 147 1DR SPIRITUALITY & JUSTICE (4.00 credits)
While focusing on Spirituality and Justice, this COR 1 course introduces the Dominican Liberal Arts tradition: building a more just and compassionate world through the integration of spirituality, study, and service, in a community searching truth. Students examine the worldviews, beliefs, values and practices that characterize the lives of Jesus of Nazareth and other figures throughout history who have inspired a strong sense of moral-spiritual power in human beings. They learn about economic, ethnic, racial, ecological and gender justice issues, as well as moral-spiritual power, from multiple marginalized perspectives, e.g. Black, Feminist, Womanist, Native American and Latin@. They also have opportunities to observe and collaborate in local efforts and ritual celebrations advocating multiple forms of justice. Finally, students articulate the characteristics of their own moral-spiritual empowerment for building a more just and compassionate world.
RS 201 LIVING SUST IN DOMINICAN STUDIUM (2.00 credits)
The first of a two-semester seminar which integrates the study and practice of eco-spiritualties and application of the principles of sustainability.  Open to students from every religious and spiritual tradition, this course builds on the features of the Dominican Studium: Community, Contemplation, Study, and Mission.  The first semester includes weekly seminars, a one-day Saturday retreat, regular gatherings for contemplative rituals and eco-celebrations as well as community meetings to deal with the practicalities of living as sustainably as possible.  Prerequisites:  COR 1 or equivalent; open to sophomores and above. Cross-listed with ENVS 201
RS 201 2ER LIVING SUST IN DOMINICAN STUDIUM (2.00 credits)
The RS 201/202 sequence satisfies the 2, E, and R tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succesfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in RS 201 (with no tags) at this time and RS 202 2ER in Spring. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of RS 202 2ER in the Spring term.
RS 202 2ER LIVING SUSTAINABLY IN DOM STUDIUM (2.00 credits)
The second of a two-semester seminar which builds on the intensive study of eco-spiritualities and efforts to live sustainably begun in RS 201. Students partner with others in the wider community in a variety of sustainability efforts through research and practical assistance.  In addition to weekly seminars, students summarize their learning, beliefs and actions for the annual Edgewood Engaged Symposium and write a COR 2 Statement to articulate their own spirituality, worldview, beliefs and values.  Note well: Students must take both RS 201 and RS 202 in order to fulfill requirements for the COR 2, E and R tags. Prerequisites: RS 201. Cross-listed with ENVS 202 2ER
RS 210 RU JESUS & THE GOSPELS (4.00 credits)
What about Jesus? Who was he?  Who is he?  We cannot attend to these questions without  a close reading of early Christian literature. This course examines the Gospels and selected documents created by the earliest Christians through lenses drawn from historical, theological, and narrative methodologies. After examining one of the Gospels in detail, we engage a selection of Jesus' moral and ethical teachings and the impacts the Jesus event had on the literary world of early Christianity. Rather than definitive answers, however, we seek relevant questions.  We discover the power these documents have to draw us deeply into their world and to see our own with more clarity and precision. Prerequisites: ENG 110, PHIL 101.
RS 218 CR IMAGES OF FAITH:STORY SCREEN SPIRIT (4.00 credits)
An exploration of the place of religious faith in human development, the symbolic elements which landscape the religious imagination, and the ways these find expression in scripture, autobiography, poetry, fiction, drama, contemporary music and/or film. This course explores the themes of grace, ritual and the process of human conversion as depicted in selected literary and cinematic narratives. Participants in the course will investigate the human capacity to hear and tell stories, and will read selected works of fiction and poetry and view films that highlight the role of ritual and narrative in human/religious transformation and self-understanding. Prerequisites: T and W tags.
RS 220 JEWISH PERSPECTIVES ON THE BIBLE (2.00 credits)
Normally taught by a local Rabbi, this course introduces students to contemporary Jewish approaches to studying TANAK:  the Torah, the Prophets and the Writings of the Hebrew Bible with a special emphasis on the relevance the study of Tanak has in Jewish life today.  Prerequisites: None.
RS 225 GR RELI & SPRTL TRDTNS OF THE WRLD (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the nature, content, significance and function of religion within human experience as evidenced in the principal religious traditions of the world - indigenous and tribal, eastern and western, past and present. By considering their respective worldviews, beliefs, values, practices, institutions and cultural expressions, students learn to recognize similarities and differences, as well as what makes each tradition unique. In developing the ability to think both empathetically and critically about religious claims, students engage two ways of knowing: (1) an ordered knowledge concerning the origin, evolution, teachings and practices of select religious traditions; and (2) a panoramic sense of the meaning of religion, the complexities of religious experiences and their multiple expressions, and the consequent broadening of our own understanding of the world, of its peoples, and of ourselves. Prerequisites: None.
RS 240 RU PERSONAL MORALITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the theory and practice of Christian ethics in its personal, social and cultural dimensions. Personal identity, moral character and conscience development, and ethical values and choices are explored, and issues of social justice are investigated utilizing case studies grouped around the themes of Catholic social teaching. Participants in the course will discover connections and contrasts between Christian ethical thought and their own perspectives on human persons and communities as moral agents, making decisions and acting on them within the limits of personal, historical, social and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: T tag.
RS 248 2R SPIRITUALITY IN THE 21ST CENTURY (4.00 credits)
A theoretical and practical exploration of Spirituality and its relationship to inner well-being, the transformation of consciousness, and the development of lifestyles that contribute to building a more just, compassionate, and sustainable world. In addition to examining features of the spiritual journey in diverse religious and secular traditions, students explore the characteristics of their own personal spiritualities as they adopt spiritual practices, visit spiritual sites, and engage in experiential and/or service learning in the community. Required for RS majors who have not taken RS 101 or RS 147. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to sophomore and above students.
RS 265 RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS OF THE EAST (4.00 credits)
This course is a study of selected major religions of South and East Asia with respect to their history, literature, and influence today. Prerequisites: None.
RS 279 INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Students choose a topic of interest in Religious Studies or select writings of a major theologian (e.g. Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Tillich, Segundo, Ruether, Johnson, neo-Thomists, Feminists, Liberation Theology). Requires preparation of a paper or public presentation. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
RS 302 RU CATHOLICISM TODAY (4.00 credits)
Exploring the riches of the Catholic tradition that keep the Church vibrant today. In line with Jesus’ exhortation that the best instruction brings from our storeroom both the old and the new (Mt 13:52), we will explore traditional themes such as the Sacraments, the mission and nature of the Church, the Communion of Saints, and normativity of Scripture and Tradition and how these ideas continue to enliven the Catholic imagination and reform the Church in our day. Prerequisites: W & T tags or equivalent
RS 305 SEM IN RELIGION & PUB LIFE I (2.00 credits)
This course is a first semester of a study of contemporary issues relating to religion and public life. Biblical notions of justice, papal encyclicals, pastoral letters of Bishops' Conferences, and/or statements of the World Council of Churches provide a basis for discussion and participation in an area of social justice or public policy. Prerequisites: None.
RS 307 2GR LBRTN THEOLOGIES IN LATIN AMERICA (4.00 credits)
This COR 2 course begins and ends with "action in solidarity" with Latin American immigrants struggling for justice. Study includes investigation of a variety of Latin American Theologies of Liberation as they have found expression in the spiritualties (worldviews, beliefs, values, practices & lifestyles) and writings (essays, sermons, letters, theological treatises, and poetry) of theologian/practitioners from each of the three generations of Latin American Liberationists. In each case, the historical, political, economic and ecclesial contexts of la lucha will be examined as students discover the intimate connection in their own lives between action, study/reflection, and spirituality in the praxis of liberation theology. Includes a minimum of 20-hours community engagement. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second- or third-year students or sophomore and above transfers. Any "I" tag course, Any "W" tag course. Any "T" tag course.
RS 308 BLACK THEO & DSMNTLG OF RACISM, I (2.00 credits)
This course is an opportunity to identify and develop your personal spirituality through the study of Black Liberation Theologies and the dismantling of racism. After examining the history of racism and white privilege, we explore the writings of Black and Womanist theologians and their significance in the struggle for racial justice. This two-semester sequence meets one day each week for two hours in both the Fall and Spring semesters and requires significant participation in community-based and/or service-learning. Both semesters are required to fulfill the COR 2, D- and R- tags or Ethnic Studies 480H. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent, Sophomore or higher standing.
RS 308 2DR BLACK THEO & DSMNTLG OF RACISM, I (2.00 credits)
The RS 308/309 sequence satisfies the 2, D, and R tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succesfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the 2, D, and R tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in RS 308 at this time and RS 309 2DR in the Spring term. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of RS 309 2DR in the Spring term.
RS 309 2DR BLACK THEO & DSMNTLG OF RACISM, II (2.00 credits)
Integrating insights from the first semester's consideration of racism and white privilege, the philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the theologies of Black and Womanist Theologians, this semester focuses on what is being done to dismantle racism in your own field of study (major or minor), area of community involvement (volunteer or athletic organization) or intended career path. Students are required to participate in the annual White Privilege Conference (additional cost for travel and registration) OR a minimum of 20 hours of community-based, anti-racism or healing racism series and multicultural trainings offered in the Madison area. Students report on their own efforts to dismantle racism during the Edgewood Engaged Symposium in April.  Each student completes a COR 2 Statement connecting learning beliefs/values and their own stance on racism and building "the beloved community." Prerequisites: RS 308. Cross-listed with ETHS 480H 2DR
RS 311 RU GOD & HEBREW BIBLE HISTORICAL BOOKS (4.00 credits)
If you want to meet God there is no better place to start than the Hebrew Bible. This text, which is foundational for much of Western civilization, is also an intimate and compelling report of God’s relationship with God’s people, whom God never deserts. This God is not a theological abstraction but rather the foremost example of the twin virtues of justice and mercy whose goal is to create a people who, like God, see these attributes as complementary rather than antithetical. On one level the Historical Books (Genesis-2 Kings; 1 and 2 Chronicles; Ruth, Esther, Ezra, and Nehemiah) are a national epic. On another, they are an incisive study of leadership, government, and the challenges and opportunities of a society growing to understand the infinite worth of the human person. The failure of this culture, culminating in the Babylonian Captivity, is in turn a fruitful source of insight into the nature of human evil and the steadfast love of God. Our initial goal is to read selected sections through lenses drawn from historical, theological, and narrative methodologies. Gradually we will expand from straightforward readings to a deeper engagement with the text as it forms human character and informs human communities. But we do not seek, nor will we find, definitive answers, for the inquiries that underlie the Hebrew Bible are the great questions and they are resolved only as they are lived.
RS 313 RU GOD & HEBREW BIBLE:PROPHETS & WRTGS (4.00 credits)
If you want to meet God there is no better place to start than the Hebrew Bible. This text, which is foundational for much of Western civilization, is also an intimate and compelling report of God’s relationship with God’s people, whom God never deserts. This God is not a theological abstraction but rather the foremost example of the twin virtues of justice and mercy whose goal is to create a people who, like God, see these attributes as complementary rather than antithetical. The prophetic literature of ancient Israel is a remarkable meditation on these virtues, and on the difficulties of living them in a cruel, competitive, and materialistic society. Beyond that, though, these sections of the Hebrew Bible are also a prayer book for Christianity and Judaism, a wellspring of ancient Wisdoms, and a most fearless and perceptive analysis of the problem of human evil. Our initial goal is to read selected sections through lenses drawn from historical, theological, and narrative methodologies. Gradually we will expand from straightforward readings to a deeper engagement with the text as it forms human character and informs human communities. But we do not seek, nor will we find, definitive answers, for the inquiries that underlie the Hebrew Bible are the great questions and they are resolved only as they are lived.
RS 314 RU NEW TESTAMENT CHRISTIANITY (4.00 credits)
How did the life and death of Jesus alter our world? The earliest indications of the massive changes that would soon transform much of the human community are found in the humble letters, homilies, and histories of the New Testament. These texts document the spread of Christianity from Jerusalem; record the earliest theological reflections on the Jesus event; provide the sordid details of Christian congregations gone badly awry; and predict the great climax of history. Our study is not simply about the past, nor does it seek authoritative answers for the present; instead, we will learn to raise significant questions of these texts as Christians today join with others in building a more just and compassionate world for the future. Prerequisites: ENG 110, PHIL 101.
RS 322 2QR CONTEMPORARY JEWISH LIFE & THOUGHT (4.00 credits)
Judaism has long been seen as a patriarchal religion in which women are relegated to a secondary role in religious life. However, no religious community lives in a vacuum. Egalitarian ideals in the 19th century liberation movements, plus contemporary feminist liberation movements in the United States have greatly influenced and improved the status of women in modern progressive Jewish movements. Current feminist Jewish scholarship is reclaiming the lost stories and lifting up the lost voices of women throughout Jewish texts and history. At the same time contemporary liturgical developments and social justice efforts continue to raise up women's experiences and to enhance women's place in the Jewish community. This course explores traditional understandings of women's roles in Jewish life and contrasts this with contemporary developments in feminist Jewish scholarship, feminist Jewish theology, and feminist Jewish activism. An essential component of this course will be participation in community-based service learning in partnership with Jewish women in Madison. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to students in their second or third year, or sophomore and above transfers.
RS 324 RUX EXPLORING CHRISTIAN THOUGHT (4.00 credits)
An exploration of the basic concepts and themes of Christianity as taught in the churches, understood by contemporary theologians, and expressed in the lives of believers. What is Faith? How do Christians understand God, creation, human beings, Jesus, sin and evil? How is Christian spirituality practiced today? What is the relationship between Christianity and other religions? To answer these we consider a wide spectrum of theological perspectives, each of which is shaped by the diverse contexts of culture, gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and socio-economic location. The course highlights dimensions of faith which all Christians share as well as the beautiful diversity present within the Christian tradition. Prerequisites: Any "I" tag course, any "T" tag course and ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
RS 327 RELIGIONS AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (4.00 credits)
An interdisciplinary, multi-cultural and experiential exploration of the role religious perspectives play in shaping the human understanding of and response to issues and events of the day: globalization, poverty, war, environment/sustainability, gender, and other topics may be considered. Prerequisites: None.
RS 328 STRONG RELIGION: FUNDAMENTALISM (4.00 credits)
An exploration of social and religious forces behind fundamentalist tendencies in the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam). Examination of their respective histories and value systems, dialogue with representatives of these cultures, consideration of alternative perspectives from within and outside each tradition. Gender roles, women's perspectives, and response/reporting by the media. Prerequisites: None.
RS 330 GR THE EVOLUTION OF GLBL CHRISTIANITY (4.00 credits)
Christianity has a rich and complex story to tell. Beginning with the New Testament era, our study then moves to the interaction between Christianity and Rome, sketching the new sect's transition from a small and persecuted Jewish group to the sole legal religion of the Empire. Medieval Christianity features the Holy Roman Empire, the schism between Eastern and Western Christianity, and the encounter with Islam, while Renaissance brings new vitality to Christian thought and artistic expression. Early modern Christianity brings us the Reformations and expansion into Eastern Asia, the Indian subcontinent, and the Americas. Through all of this we trace the intricate interaction between Christians and their larger communities with an eye to the real issue: how does modern Christianity participate in the global community and how can it more effectively promote a just and compassionate world? Prerequisites: ENG 110, PHIL 101.
RS 331 CHRISTIAN WORSHIP (4.00 credits)
This course is an experiential and theological investigation of liturgical celebration as encounter with and response to the Beauty, Love and Mystery of God. Remembering, rehearsing and realizing the Reign of God in times & seasons, places and spaces, signs and symbols, proclamations and prayers, meals and music, passages and journeys, ministries and mission. Prerequisites: None.
RS 341 CATHOLIC THEOLOGY FOR 21ST CENTURY (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
An investigation of principal themes in Catholic theology using Church documents and the writings of contemporary Catholic theologians. Prerequisites: RS 330 GR Evolution of Global Christianity; RS 302 RU Catholicism Today or RS 340 RUX Exploring Christian Thought, or consent of the instructor.
RS 343 WOMEN AND RELIGION (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
This course explores women's issues in a variety of religious traditions from a feminist perspective including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Native American, Eastern traditions and goddess religion. Autobiography, feminist interpretation of scripture and expressions of women's spirituality are included. Cross-listed with WS 343. Prerequisites: Any WS or Q tag course AND at least one R tag course.
RS 344 DQR WOMEN AND MULTICULTURAL THEOLOGIES (4.00 credits)
How do women theologians from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds understand and discuss God, Jesus, Human Beings, the Bible, Spirituality, Ecology and the Roles of Women in religion and society today? How do North American women “do theology” in their African-American, Latina, Native American, Asian-American, Euro-American and/or socio-economic contexts?  What kinds of theology are women theologians in Latin America, Asia and Africa doing?  In what ways do race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and nation shape the formation and development of Christian feminist theologies? From multicultural perspectives, this course explores the questions, experiences, values, concerns, and challenges that women bring to the understanding and practice of Christian faith and its implications for building a more just and compassionate world. Prerequisites: I-, T-, and W- tags or their equivalents. Cross-listed with ETHS 344 DQR.
RS 345 RELIGION AND SOCIETY (2.00 credits)
An introduction to the sociology of religion, including the concepts of" sacred and secular," sects and church, secularization, and the church as a social institution. Cross-listed with WS 343. No prerequisites.
RS 346 GQU MYSTICS AND GENDER (4.00 credits)
Across religions, mystics transgress normal religious boundaries in order to have a direct experience of the divine. The field of gender studies examines the social construction of sex and gender roles and norms, questioning their normatively and naturalization. In this course, mysticism and gender studies will be used to inform and interrogate each other as mechanisms for challenging existing structures of power, received notions of goodness and transcendent truth claims. Prerequisites: PHIL 101.
RS 351 2D NATIVE AMERICAN SPIRITUALITY (4.00 credits)
An experiential and community-based survey of native religious traditions, exploring the breadth and depth of spiritual expression among native people in North America, with particular emphasis on the Anishinabe bands of Wisconsin. Important themes include sacred landscapes, mythic narratives, oral histories, communal identities, tribal values, elder teachigns, visionary experiences, ceremonial practices, prayer traditions, and trickster wisdom. This course includes significant engagement in Native American communities. $40 Course fee. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent, I, T, and W tags. Cross-Listed with ETHS 480J 2D
RS 356 2GR THE CHALLENGE OF ISLAM (4.00 credits)
The events of 9/11 and other recent radical Muslim terrorist activities worldwide have caused both a growing interest in understanding Islam and an increased animosity toward the faith accompanied by stereotyping and profiling individuals. The presupposition of this course is that the "challenge of Islam" cannot be addressed without understanding Islam's scriptures, values, history, culture, and attitude toward politics. The challenge can present itself either as one to Muslims or one to non-Muslims. All students will complete an experiential component with members of the Muslim community of Madison through individual conversational partners and through dialogue with guest presenters in class. Cross-listed with ETHS 480D 2GR. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
RS 358 2GR CHRISTIAN-MUSLIM DIALOGUE (4.00 credits)
This course, an experiential exploration of interfaith dialogue between Christians and Muslims, studies the foundational beliefs and practices of each tradition with a special focus on the variety of cultural and intercultural contexts in which adherents practice their faith today. Students study, witness and experience different models of interfaith dialogue as partners consider some of the ethical, theological, economic, political and practical issues dividing and uniting the world-wide Muslim and Christian communities. The seminar includes participation in several community-based dialogues, observation of Christian and Muslim celebrations, student presentations and the writing of a Personal Mission Statement. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; W, and T tags.
RS 361 GRU BUDDHISM & CHRISITANITY IN DIALOGUE (4.00 credits)
An exploration of the foundational beliefs and practices of Buddhism and Christianity and how they might learn from one another while remaining distinct. Students study, witness and experience different models of interfaith dialogue as partners consider some of the ethical, theological, economic, political and practical issues dividing and uniting the world-wide Buddhist and Christian communities with a special focus on the variety of cultural and intercultural contexts in which adherents practice their faith today. Prerequisites: W, and T tags.
RS 379 INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics and credits to be approved by an advisor in the Department of Religious Studies. (Prerequisite: At least two "R" tagged courses; normally for RS Majors and Minors only.) Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
RS 380 TEACHING RELIGIOUS STUDIES (2.00 credits)
A study of traditional as well as contemporary methods of teaching religious studies, including opportunities for evaluating curricula, methodologies, programs. Adaptations appropriate to the needs of students of different ages and different types of learning situations will be emphasized according to the goals of the participants. Prerequisites: major, minor, or consent of the instructor.
RS 404 SEMINAR ON CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING (3.00 credits)
An intensive examination of the principles and practical implications of Catholic social teaching to contemporary issues. Presentations and discussions of official documents are joined with field work in partnership with Wisconsin Catholic Conference, Catholic Charities, Catholic Multicultural Center and others. Prerequisites: None.
RS 405 SEM RELIGION & PUB LIFE II (2.00 credits)
This course is the study of contemporary issues relating to religion and public life. Biblical notions of justice, papal encyclicals, pastoral letters of Bishops' Conferences, and/or statements of the World Council of Churches provide a basis for continued discussion and participation in an area of social justice. Normally includes experiential and/or service learning and/or trip abroad (which will entail additional expenses). Prerequisites: None.
RS 406 3 LEARNING, BELIEFS & ACTION:CMN GOOD (4.00 credits)
In this seminar students select and investigate a theme/problem/issue through academic inquiry, scholarly research, community-based learning, and intellectual reflection. In so doing, they will develop integrative, creative theories and solutions to contemporary human issues and problems; strive to harmonize their own beliefs with their intellectual, critical, and cultural development; and deepen their own spiritualities with a vision toward justice, peace and the common good. Prerequisites: a declared major, junior standing, completion of H, R, U, and X tags.
RS 414 SCRIPTURE: ADVANCED STUDY (4.00 credits)
An advanced detailed study of specific books or themes in scripture. Prerequisites: RS 210 and RS 310 or RS 314 or equivalent, permission of the instructor.
RS 416 K THE ART OF PREACHING (4.00 credits)
Preaching is an art form that gives voice to a faith tradition in the moment. It gives artistic expression to shared values and challenges listeners to embrace them and apply them in a new way in the world today. This course is an introduction to the fundamental techniques and aesthetics of this art form that transcend religious boundaries. Students will be encouraged to apply them within their own religious context. Performance techniques may include oral interpretation of religious texts, oral story-telling, and video production.
RS 422 REFORMATION & COUNTER-REFORMATION (4.00 credits)
A survey of the rise of Protestantism and Protestant theologies, the reform of Roman Catholicism, the response of Roman Catholicism to Protestantism, and the effects of these movements on European society. Prerequisites: None.
RS 429 TEACHING OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES 1-6 (2.00 credits)
This course is a study of curricula and methods appropriate for the teaching of religious studies in the elementary school. Prerequisites: None.
RS 431 SACRAMENTAL CELEBRATIONS (4.00 credits)
Historical development and contemporary theology and practice of the chief liturgical rites of the Christian churches. Includes pastoral and practical implications for preparing and participating in sacramental liturgies. Prerequisites: RS 331 or consent of instructor..
RS 442 RU MORAL RESPONSBLTYÐICS OF HEALTH (4.00 credits)
This course explores some of the spiritual, religious and philosophical approaches to moral responsibility while examining current ethical problems and dilemmas posed by health and health care. Major areas of focus will include ethics in clinical medicine, public health, and the intersection of health ethics with global justice and human rights. Students will learn through lectures, course readings, case studies examined in small groups and class discussion, small group projects, and individual semester projects. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, completion of I, O, T, and W tags, and at least one S-tagged course.
RS 450 3RV PERSPECTIVES IN SCIENCE & RELIGION (4.00 credits)
Preeminent among modern human quests are the disciplines of science and religion. One seeks insight into the natural world; the other looks for value and meaning within this world and the life it sustains. In this course we will explore the relationship between the two from a historical perspective, then move on to an examination of their interaction in the modern world. We seek to identify perspectives on this relationship that will show how one has implications for the other, the places where developments in one may benefit the other, and the possibility that the two can work together to build a just and compassionate world. Prerequisites: COR 2, senior status or permission of the instructor.
RS 451 SELECTED TOPICS (4.00 credits)
A study of selected topics in religious thought including theology, scripture, spirituality, interpersonal ethics, social justice, ecology and/or sociology of religion. Prerequisites: None.
RS 452 TOPICS IN RS: (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
A study of selected topics in religious thought including theology, scripture, spirituality, interpersonal ethics, social justice, ecology and/or sociology of religion. Prerequisites: None.
RS 454 SELECTED TOPICS: FOUNDTNS IN FAITH (10.00 credits)
A study of selected topics related to the foundations of faith in religious experience, revelation, scripture, theologies and/or spiritualties. Prerequisites: None.
RS 455 SELECTED TOPICS: REL IN AMERICA (0.00 credits)
A study of selected topics related to Religion in America, religious freedom, religious pluralism, the role of religious faiths in the public sector, etc.  Prerequisites: None.
RS 458B STUDENT TCHGN:INTRN:REL STU,ELMNTRY (10.00 credits)
Prerequisites: RS Major or Minor; Junior or Senior standing.
RS 459 TEACHING OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES: 7-12 (2.00 credits)
The study of curricula and methods appropriate for the teaching of religious studies in the secondary school. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 20 credits in RS; instructors approval.
RS 484 INTERNSHIP:PASTORAL/SOC JUST MNSTRY (4.00 - 10.00 credits)
Supervised observation and participation in one or more of the following situations: 1) Interning in a Religious Ed or Pastoral Ministry program; 2) interning with a Social Justice organization or ministry; 3) interning with an Ecological organization or ministry
RS 490 PRACTICUM (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Practicum in Religious Education or Christian Ministry according to the goals of the student. Prerequisites: None.
RS 498 SENIOR RELIGIOUS STUDIES SEMINAR (4.00 credits)
This course discusses the academic inquiry, scholarly research, community-based learning, and intellectual reflection in preparation for senior research paper and/or presentation.  RS majors integrate at least two of the three RS areas of study along with their cornerstone skills and one discipline outside the major.  This course is usually taught in conjunction with RS 406 3 Learning, Beliefs & Action for the Common Good which serves as the COR 3 experience required of majors. Prerequisites: 32 credits in RS and Senior status.
RS 499 WORKSHOPS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (2.00 credits)
After students have participated in at least three theological, biblical, or pastoral workshops and conferences related to their professional goals, they enroll in this course to complete additional research on a related topic and prepare to share what they have learned at the Edgewood Engaged Conference or through presenting a workshop related to their ministerial or professional field.    Prerequisites: None.
RS 510 BIBLICAL STUDIES (3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
RS 540 FOUNDATIONS OF MORALITY (3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
RS 545A INTRODUCTORY LEVEL TOPICS (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
RS 545B INTRODUCTORY LEVEL TOPICS (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
RS 545C INTRODUCTORY LEVEL TOPICS (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
RS 545D INTRODUCTORY LEVEL TOPICS (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
RS 605 RELIGION & CONTEMPORARY STUDIES (3.00 credits)
Prerequisites: None.
RS 610 CURRENT TRENDS IN MINISTRY (3.00 credits)
Opportunity to explore the needs of global and local communities by examining outstanding leaders, systemic and cultural conditions, and possible ways participants can respond to present and future needs. Prerequisites: None.
RS 615 RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS & MODERN WORLD (3.00 credits)
Research into the interplay of religious traditions with contemporary studies of cultures, societies, politics, economics and the humanities. Prerequisites: RS 520 or 225 or recent survey course in world religions.
RS 620 HEBREW SCRIPTURES (3.00 credits)
An advanced, detailed exegetical study of specific books or themes of the Hebrew Scriptures. Prerequisites: RS 510A or 210A or recent course in Hebrew Scriptures..
RS 625 CURRENT TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Special study of selected topics and themes in Religious Studies which vary according to the goals and needs of the students. Areas may include: Religious Leadership/ Church Administration; Church History; Religious Literature; Religious Literature of the West; Religious Literature of the East. Prerequisites: None.
RS 626 TOPICS: IMAGES, SYMBOLS, NARRATIVES (3.00 credits)
Special study of selected topics and themes in Religious Studies. Students select topics and share results of research and experiential learning in seminar style papers, projects, and presentations. Prerequisites: None.
RS 627 TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (3.00 credits)
Special study of selected topics and themes in Religious Studies which vary according to the goals and needs of the students. Areas may include: Religious Leadership/ Church Administration; Church History; Religious Literature; Religious Literature of the West; Religious Literature of the East. Prerequisites: None.
RS 628 TOPICS IN RS: PSALMS (3.00 credits)
Special study of selected topics and themes in Religious Studies which vary according to the goals and needs of the students. Areas may include: Religious Leadership/ Church Administration; Church History; Religious Literature; Religious Literature of the West; Religious Literature of the East. Prerequisites: None.
RS 629 TOPICS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (3.00 credits)
Special study of selected topics and themes in Religious Studies which vary according to the goals and needs of the students. Areas may include: Religious Leadership/ Church Administration; Church History; Religious Literature; Religious Literature of the West; Religious Literature of the East. Prerequisites: None.
RS 630 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES (3.00 credits)
An advanced, detailed exegetical study of specific books or themes of the Christian Scriptures. Prerequisites: RS 510B or 210B or recent course in Christian Scriptures..
RS 640 DEVELP OF REL LIFE & THOUGHT (3.00 credits)
An in-depth investigation of specific religious ideas and movements in Christianity and/or other religions, to study the interconnectedness of ideas and movements with one another, especially in the historical context. Prerequisites: RS 530 or 230 or course in history of Christianity or the equivalent..
RS 650 MORAL DEC-MKG IN ECUMENICAL WORLD (3.00 credits)
A study of the bases of moral decision- making (e.g. revelation, reason, custom) in ethical and religious traditions and an analysis of authoritative texts using models of moral development, reinterpretation, and modernization. Prerequisites: RS 240/242 or IC 800 Ethics or course in philosophical or theological ethics..
RS 660 WORSHIP (3.00 credits)
A study of ritual and the roles of symbol, myth, imagination and the arts in contemporary worship. Includes insights from theology, history, faith development theory, and anthropology. Prerequisites: None.
RS 670 COUNSELING MODELS/SKILLS IN MINSTRY (3.00 credits)
A study of models of counseling and what constitutes skills for effective ministry, with field experience to practice these skills. Prerequisites: None.
RS 675 PRACT INTERN PROFESSIONAL (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Supervised observation and participation in situations appropriate to the particular goals of the student. Prerequisites: departmental approval.
RS 680 INTERNSHIP PROFESS SITUATION (3.00 credits)
Supervised observation and participation in situations appropriate to the particular goals of the student. Prerequisites: None.
RS 700 THEMES IN THEOLOGY (3.00 credits)
Research into particular areas of western Christian theologies, including recent and contemporary theologians, and topics such as God, Christ, Spirit, Community, and Eschatology. Prerequisites: None.
RS 710 CHURCH HIST/MODELS OF THE CHURCH (3.00 credits)
An investigation of select theologies of ministry in their historical and cultural contexts and in relationship to contemporary models of church. Prerequisites: None.
RS 720 SACRAMENTS/LITURGY (3.00 credits)
Research into specialized topics that relate to liturgical and sacramental celebrations including their historical, theological and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: None.
RS 730 SPIRITUALITY (3.00 credits)
A critical examination of some of the ways persons, groups and/or particular traditions articulate their experiences of prayer, spirit, and community. Prerequisites: None.
RS 790 INDEPENDENT READING/RESRCH/PROJECT (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics, orientation, and bibliography to be developed with the approval of the Religious Studies Department. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 791 INDEPENDENT READING/RESRCH/PROJECT (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics, orientation, and bibliography to be developed with the approval of the Religious Studies Department. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 792 INDEPENDENT READING/RESRCH/PROJECT (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics, orientation, and bibliography to be developed with the approval of the Religious Studies Department. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 793 INDEPENDENT READING/RESRCH/PROJECT (3.00 credits)
Topics, orientation, and bibliography to be developed with the approval of the Religious Studies Department. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 794 INDEPENDENT READING/RESRCH/PROJECT (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics, orientation, and bibliography to be developed with the approval of the Religious Studies Department. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 795 SEMINAR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Selected topics and themes studied in a focused manner. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 796 WORKSHOPS SEMINAR IN RS (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Selected topics and themes studied in a focused manner. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 797 SEMINAR: THE FOURTH GOSPEL (3.00 credits)
Selected topics and themes studied in a focused manner. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 798 SEMINAR:FOUNDATIONS IN FAITH (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
Selected topics and themes studied in a focused manner. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.
RS 799 SEMINAR: RELIGIOUS STUDIES (3.00 credits)
Selected topics and themes studied in a focused manner. (Variable Credit.) Prerequisites: None.