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ANTH 366 ANTHROPOLOGY OF SEX AND GENDER (4.00 credits)
An exploration of cultural variation in the categorization of persons by sex and the operation of gender in social life, especially in small-scale societies. Special consideration will be given to women's position in non-Western societies. Prerequisites: None.
ANTH 379 INDEPENDENT STUDY - ANTHROPOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics and credits arranged. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
ANTH 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - ANTHROPOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics and credits arranged. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
ANTH 222 GJ INTRO TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the nature and diversity of human society and culture through an examination of specific cross-cultural cases. It includes a comparative study of social, political and economic organization, patterns of religious and aesthetic orientations, gender issues, relations with the natural environment, as well as the process of sociocultural persistence and change. Special consideration will be given to the circumstances faced by contemporary small-scale societies. Cross-listed with ETHS 222. Prerequisites: None.
ANTH 346 MYTH AND SHAMANISM (4.00 credits)
A cross-cultural approach to the study of belief systems with a focus on the use of myth and the practice of shamanism. Emphasis will be placed on hunter-gatherer and horticultural experiences, but consideration will also be given to the use of myth and shamanism in post-industrial societies. Prerequisites: None.
ANTH 310 SELECTED TOPICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY (4.00 credits)
A course which will examine vital areas of contemporary concern in anthropology. The topic or problem of the course changes each semester. Prerequisites: None.
ANTH 380 SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
An examination of selected problems or issues. The seminar is frequently used in conjunction with courses in the sequence on major social institutions to provide an opportunity for the student to examine an area of particular interest within a seminar format. Prerequisites: None.
ANTH 480 SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
An examination of selected problems or issues. The seminar is frequently used in conjunction with courses in the sequence on major social institutions to provide an opportunity for the student to examine an area of particular interest within a seminar format. Prerequisites: None.

CJ 342 CAPITAL PUNISHMENT (4.00 credits)
A historical study of capital punishment in the United States from the 1600s to the present. A close examination on the five methods of execution. An overview of wrongful deaths and high profile capital cases. Revisit issues on: Execution of youth for heinous crimes; submission of DNA evidence in capital cases; and the U.S. Constitution's VIII Amendment as it relates to what constitutes "Cruel and Unusual Punishment." A critical analysis of arguments in favor of and in opposition to capital punishment. Prerequisites: None.
CJ 232 J CRIMINOLOGY (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the historical development and the functions and processes of the criminal justice system, highlighting law enforcement and the judicial system. Includes varying special interest topics, such as restorative justice, innocence project, community policing, the death penalty, victimization and community-based corrections. Prerequisites: None.
CJ 372 ETHICS IN ACTION: CRIMINAL JUSTICE (4.00 credits)
In this course students will examine the ethical issues which challenge criminal justice professionals on the job every day. The course will include placement in an internship which will allow students to experience the operations of their chosen branch of the criminal justice system firsthand. The course will also cover the latest research on ethical debates in the field of criminal justice. The course will include not only working in the field, but also face-to-face and on-line discussions of ethical issues related to working in the criminal justice system today. Prerequisite: CJ 232. (F/S)
CJ 355 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW (4.00 credits)
Criminal law to obtain a basic understanding of the criminal process and its underlying purposes and legal principles, and the fundamentals of legal analysis. The course will include the study of several areas of current concern in criminal justice. Prerequisites: None.
CJ 236 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the issues, including an examination of definitions of childhood; the rules that define delinquency; historical and contemporary reactions to delinquent behavior; diverse and conflicting models of delinquency causation; and an overview of the changing systems of juvenile justice. Cross-listed with SOC 236. Prerequisites: None.
CJ 337 POLICING IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
This course will give an overview of issues related to the policing of modern society. Specific issues covered will include proper criminal procedures, police discretion, police roles and responsibilities and problems in policing such as police brutality. Prerequisites: CJ 232J.
CJ 338 PRISONS AND CORRECTIONS IN SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
Situates the prison and the correctional system within the processes of the American and comparative criminal justice structures, exploring the historical development of the prison and imprisonment within changing legal, political, and religious definitions of crime and punishment. Questions regarding political legitimacy, coercive power, and the processes of socialization and adaptation within the prison and the wider correctional system are explored, as well as the administrative relationships between the correctional system and other political and socio-economic structures. The course includes field trips to correctional institutions. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: None.
CJ 340 THEORIES OF DEVIANCE (4.00 credits)
A theoretical study of criminal and deviant behavior in society, since the 18th century in Europe to present day. Various schools of thought, from the Classical School, Positivist School, and the Chicago School will be examined. Deviance will be viewed from sociological, biological, and psychological perspectives. Cross-listed with SOC 340. Prerequisites: CJ 232J.
CJ 343 Q VIOLENCE AND VICTIMIZATION (4.00 credits)
This course is a criminological overview of current patterns of violence and victimization in the United States and abroad. It is also an introduction to the sub-discipline of victimology, and covers several theories of victimization. Further, the social and psychological impacts of victimization on crime victims are discussed. Specific topics covered include rape, child victimization, and partner violence. Further, possible solutions to maladaptive victim responses and methods to increase victim empowerment through criminal justice system services are covered. Prerequisites: CJ 232.

ECON 680 ACTION RESEARCH I:FINANCIAL&ECON ED (1.00 credits)
Initial exploration of the methodology of action research projects. Students will develop program evaluations for the nifel courses. Students will develop assessment techniques in the general area of financial and economic education. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 330 GJ COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (4.00 credits)
A seminar designed to study the response of different societies to the economic problem of production, distribution and consumption. The creation of market institutions as the most prevalent solution to the basic economic problem will be the major focus of the course. Alternative solutions to the basic economic problem will be analyzed with the special emphasis on traditional and command style solutions to the economic problem. Comparative institutional responses will be explored with special attention to Japan, China, India, Russia, Poland and Bangladesh. The difficulties associated with the transition from a traditional society to a market driven society and the equally perilous transition from a socialist economy to a market driven economy will be explored through case studies. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 350 ECON OF LABOR,POVERTY,&INCOME DISTR (4.00 credits)
The methodology of economics to evaluate current issues in the labor market, including, but are not limited to, unions, collective bargaining, poverty, income distribution, wage differentials, discrimination, unemployment, education, technological change, and employer monopsony power. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 325 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (2.00 credits)
Examines the mechanisms societies employ to allocate limited natural resources among unlimited demands. By seeing environmental issues as economic issues, this course identifies the incentives faced by consumers and producers that lead to environmental problems and how alternative incentives might alleviate problems like pollution, global warming, and vanishing rainforests; or to promote sustainable resource use. Cross-listed with ENVS 325. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 652 FINANCIAL & ECON ED III (3.00 credits)
An intensive overview of basic tax issues such as income taxes, social security taxes, and estate taxes. An additional section will deal with retirement planning and related taxation issues. A final section will focus on entrepreneurial opportunities for workers displaced by technology. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 315 HEALTH CARE ECONOMICS (2.00 credits)
An intensive exposure to the economics of health care with special emphasis on rising health care cost, comparative health care systems, access to health care, and economic implications of local and national health care policy. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 379 INDEPENDENT STUDY - ECONOMICS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics (e.g., financial economics, industrial organization, European economic history) and credits to be arranged. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
ECON 279 INDEPENDENT STUDY - ECONOMICS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
ECON 651 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ECONOMICS (3.00 credits)
Builds on ECON 650. Covers topics in insurance, retirement financing, personal finances, financial decision making and estate planning. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 450 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (4.00 credits)
An advanced course in economics with emphasis on international trade theory, open macro-economic models, and foreign exchange markets. For the first part of the course, economic theory will be used to analyze patterns of trade and the impact of trade policy arrangements such as NAFTA and WTO. The latter half of the course will be used to analyze modern theories of exchange rate determination and the impact of trade imbalances on the macroeconomy. Crosslisted with graduate course BUS 611. Prerequisites: ECON 255F4 or 256F4.
ECON 650 INTRO TO FINANCIAL & ECONOMIC ED (3.00 credits)
A three credit graduate course intended to serve as introduction to financial economics with a heavy emphasis on savings, the future value of money, present value calculations, and the role of credit in the modern economy. There will be a section devoted to the role of money and credit in the overall macro-economy with special emphasis on the role of the Federal Reserve in controlling the quantity of money and credit in the economy. The last section of the course will focus on the role of hedging interest rate risk by utilizing futures markets and traded options on the Chicago Board of Trade and Chicago Mercantile Exchange. A field trip to Chicago will provide the students with a direct experience with the futures markets and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 495 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (4.00 credits)
Economic theory applied to managerial decision-making. This course combines the theoretical concepts and quantitative tools used by economists for practical applications to decisions concerning prices, demand, production, costs, risk, market structure, and government policy toward business. Cross- listed as graduate course BUS 610. Prerequisites: ECON 256F4.
ECON 460 MONEY, BANKING & CAPITAL MARKETS (4.00 credits)
This course covers the evolution of money, the development of banking institutions, the theory and implementation of monetary policy, and recent developments in international monetary affairs. A final section focuses on international banking, the Eurocurrency market and the international monetary system. May be cross-listed with BUS 414 and/or 772. Prerequisites: ECON 255F4 recommended.
ECON 240 J PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (4.00 credits)
An introduction and integrated treatment of macroeconomics and microeconomics. Markets and pricing as resource allocation mechanisms, issues in fiscal and monetary policy. Exposure to economic methodology in decision making and policy evaluation.
ECON 255 GJ PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (4.00 credits)
A one semester course in macroeconomics designed to meet the needs of students who wish to be informed about the economic problems which beset the world. A brief and intensive exposure to traditional analytical models will constitute the first part of the course. The second part will deal with the fiscal and monetary policy in a global economy, the current account deficit, different exchange rate regimes, inflation, unemployment, the current credit crisis and the state of the world economy. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 256 J PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (4.00 credits)
The course will survey the basic principles of microeconomics. Students learn 1) how the market system operates to determine prices, allocate resources into alternative productive uses and impact social welfare; 2) circumstances under which markets may fail to provide an optimal or efficient allocation of resources and the policy options for dealing with this failure. These economic principles will be applied to an analysis of various current social issues. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 465 READING IN HISTORY OF ECON THOUGHT (4.00 credits)
Intensive overview of the major economic theorists in the 19th and 20th centuries. Offered by arrangement. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 121 J SCARCITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE (4.00 credits)
Multiple pertinent and contemporary social issues are examined with an approach used in the field of economics. In the process, an understanding of economic systems and institutions is gained. Methodology is elementary and issues covered should be of interest to a broad range of majors/disciplines. A capacity to interpret graphs and tables is appropriate for the course.
ECON 310 SELECTED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
A course which will examine vital areas of contemporary concern in economics. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 290 GJ THE GLOBAL ECONOMY (4.00 credits)
An analysis of the economic, political and cultural forces that influence relations between the United States and other countries in the world. International monetary systems, trade relationships and international capital flows will be explored in depth. The problems of developing countries will be investigated, and specific countries' financial crises will be analyzed in depth. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 250 GJ THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ENERGY (4.00 credits)
A seminar designed to explore the following issues: the economics of the global petroleum industry from the Standard Oil Trust, the Seven Sisters and OPEC; the generation and distribution of electricity over the last 100 years and the prospects for the next fifty years with special emphasis on alternative sources of electricity both on and off the grid; the global demand for fossil fuels and the impact that oil production has had on producing nations; peak oil concerns and national security issues; and the critical relationship between food production and energy inputs across the global economy. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 341A TOPICS IN AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
A course which will examine significant topics in the development of the American economy. Modules on the Great Depression, the economics of slavery and the cotton trade, monetary and banking history, and case studies of specific urban areas (e.g., New York, Chicago, Los Angeles) will be developed. Two-credit courses will be offered as half-semester, Winterim, or Summer Session courses. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 341B TOPICS IN AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
A course which will examine significant topics in the development of the American economy. Modules on the Great Depression, the economics of slavery and the cotton trade, monetary and banking history, and case studies of specific urban areas (e.g., New York, Chicago, Los Angeles) will be developed. Two-credit courses will be offered as half-semester, Winterim, or Summer Session courses. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 341C TOPICS IN AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
A course which will examine significant topics in the development of the American economy. Modules on the Great Depression, the economics of slavery and the cotton trade, monetary and banking history, and case studies of specific urban areas (e.g., New York, Chicago, Los Angeles) will be developed. Two-credit courses will be offered as half-semester, Winterim, or Summer Session courses. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 341D TOPICS IN AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
A course which will examine significant topics in the development of the American economy. Modules on the Great Depression, the economics of slavery and the cotton trade, monetary and banking history, and case studies of specific urban areas (e.g., New York, Chicago, Los Angeles) will be developed. Two-credit courses will be offered as half-semester, Winterim, or Summer Session courses. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 310A G TPC: DEVEL & SOC PROGRAMS MODRN MEX (2.00 credits)
Course content will be rooted in an economic history of Mexico from 1920. This culminates in an analysis of economic policy and institutions as they impact current conditions in Mexico. Perspectives are provided on the level of development and prosperity in Mexico as well as options for future economic policy. Prerequisites: None.
ECON 310B TPC: ECONOMICS OF CREDIT (2.00 credits)
A course which will examine vital areas of contemporary concern in economics. Prerequisites: None.

GEOG 265 E ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION (2.00 credits)
A seminar designed to investigate the ecological, cultural, geographic and economic background of the conservation of natural resources. Some of the specific issues that will be explored are: resource allocation and energy production; water issues; intergenerational externalities and food production; and population pressures. A special section will be devoted to producer and consumer cooperatives and alternative institutional responses to many of these pressing issues. Prerequisites: None.
GEOG 279 INDEPENDENT STUDY - GEOGRAPHY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
GEOG 266 MAPPING WISCONSIN (2.00 credits)
This course is intended for students in the social sciences and education who are interested in the inter-relationships between Wisconsin's physical environment and its people. Topics will include physiographic history, landscape regions, landscape morphology, climate, natural vegetations, and soils, among other things. (F)

HS 303 ADVANCED SOCIAL CHANGE SKILLS (4.00 credits)
This course addresses methods for planning and facilitating change in organizations and communities.  Students will be introduced to community and organizational theories.  The class will examine principles of planned social change and the role of social workers as macro-level change agents.  Students will learn how to analyze and define a social or organizational condition, set a goal, and organize to bring about social change from a variety of theoretical and cultural perspectives.  Students will examine ethical considerations inherent in macro-level social work.  Prerequisites: None.
HS 304 GROUP METHODS IN HUMAN SERVICES (4.00 credits)
Students will acquire basic knowledge and skills needed to work directly with small groups in Human Services.  Various forms of group practice, such as task groups, support groups, self-help groups and organizational groups, will be explored.  Special attention will be given to the development of groups and to group facilitation skills.  Professional values and ethics, as established by the National Association of Social Workers, will be employed as guiding principles to mezzo-practice skills and decisions.  Prerequisites: None.
HS 305 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT (4.00 credits)
Human development and behavior will be examined as outcomes of interaction with the social environment. Ecological and systems theories will be applied to this reciprocal process, examining biological, psychological, sociological, spiritual and cultural aspects of development. The role played by social systems (such as families, groups, communities and organizations) will be explored for each phase of human development. Particular attention will be paid to gender identity, ethnic identity, sexual orientation and socioeconomic status. Prerequisites: None.
HS 400 HUMAN SERVICES INTERNSHIP (4.00 - 6.00 credits)
Offers Human Services majors an opportunity to gain first-hand knowledge and skills of actual social work/human services practice. Facilitates the integration of curricular content through supervised experience with diverse systems and populations. Cross-listed with PSY 495C. Prerequisites: HS 300, 302, and consent of instructor..
HS 300 METHODS OF HUMAN SERVICES I (4.00 credits)
Students will learn and apply basic knowledge and skills for working directly with individuals and families (i.e., micro practice). Special attention will be given to the competencies of case management and interviewing, emphasizing communication skills and management of the helping relationship. The generalist perspective from social work will be used in a context of multiculturalism. Professional values and ethics will be employed as guiding principles to micro practice skills and decisions. In a practice course students should be prepared to take an active role in "hands-on" learning using demonstrations, dyads and small group-work. X-listed with PSY 301. Prerequisites: None.
HS 302 SOCIAL WELFARE AND POLICY (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to the history, mission, and philosophy of social work and social welfare.  It has examination of the major social welfare policies and programs in the United States and consideration of current issues. Presentation of frameworks for evaluating and influencing social policy. Prerequisites: None.

PS 351A BUDGETS, TAXES, AND THE DEBT (2.00 credits)
Special topics: Issues in Public Policy: budgets, taxes, and the debt.
PS 362 J CONGRESS & LEGISLATIVE POLITICS (2.00 credits)
The structure and behavior of legislative bodies, especially the U.S. Congress. In addition, theories of representation, the role of constituents, and the legislature's complex relationship to the other branches of government. (S of alternate years) Prerequisites: None.
PS 343 CONSTITUTIONAL POLITICS (4.00 credits)
Examines the political issues and conflicts that arise as society attempts to apply and interpret the US Constitution, especially as it regards civil rights and civil liberties. This would include such controversies as censorship, the rights of the accused, abortion, affirmative action, discrimination, privacy, and federalism. The roles played by the Supreme Court, the rest of the federal judiciary, state courts, Congress, the President, private interests, and public opinion. Notable past constitutional cases that helped shape current interpretations of the Constitution. Prerequisites: None.
PS 201 E DEBATING THE EARTH: POL PERS ON ENV (4.00 credits)
In this course, we shall explore how a diverse array of competing political perspectives views the relationship of humans to the natural environment in terms of both the sources of and the solutions to our current ecological crisis. In investigating these different paradigms and how each constructs the issues, we will come to better understand how these views shape public policy, political movements, public opinion, and even international relations. Cross listed with ENVS 203. Prerequisites: None.
PS 388 G DEMOCRCY & AUTHORIATRIANSM (4.00 credits)
PS 388 will explore the politics of democratic and authoritarian systems. It will investigate the various conceptualizations regime designs, the different accounts for democratic and authoritarian successes and failures, and how mass publics around the world understand democracy and authoritarianism.
PS 352 EJ ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS (4.00 credits)
This course examines the political dynamics that underlie environmental policymaking in the United States. Major issues in environmental policy, including public lands, wildlife, pollution and energy will be examined, as well as the role of governmental institutions, interest groups and the public in formulating environmental policy. Cross-listed with ENVS 352. (S of alternate years). Prerequisites: None.
PS 379 INDEPENDENT STUDY - POLITICAL SCI (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
PS 279 INDEPENDENT STUDY - POLITICAL SCI (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
PS 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - POLITICAL SCI (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
PS 262 J INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS (4.00 credits)
Explores the nature and structure of the American political system, and examines selected problems in American government at the national level. Prerequisites: None.
PS 275 GJ INTRO TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS (4.00 credits)
In this course we shall explore the structure and conduct of politics cross-nationally and examine some of the communalities and differences among politics and political systems around the world. Prerequisites: None.
PS 210 GJ INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (4.00 credits)
In this course we shall explore the actors, structure, and behavior of the emerging global system. Prerequisites: None.
PS 460 J MASS MEDIA & POLITICS (4.00 credits)
How media has transformed American politics in the last half-century. Explores the assumption that media coverage of politics is not apart from the events it reports on, but rather a determinant, in many ways, of those events. How the presentation of political reality by the media, especially TV, affects elections, political behavior, public opinion, policy debates, and the notion of citizenship and democracy. (F of alternate years) Prerequisites: None.
PS 387 JU PEACE & CONFLICT STUDIES (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to the study of inter-state conflict and peace studies. The underlying assumptions throughout this course is that war should be avoided and our principle focus will be to 1) identify the causes of war and 2) identify justifications and strategies for peace. As we shall see, these are interrelated, complex, and controversial topics. Both peace and conflict studies require a multi-disciplinary approach that includes psychology, philosophy and ethics, religion, economics, biology, history, and international relations. This necessarily broad approach allows us to closely examine and critique the underlying assumptions behind conflict and cooperation and trace the casual paths leading to war or to peace. We will place a special emphasis on examining and critiquing perspectives on conflict and peace at the individual, group, substate, and international levels of analysis. We will also consider the qualitative and quantitative empirical evidence in support of these theories. By the end of the course, students will appreciate the challenges of ending global conflict but also possess the knowledge to suggest realistic, peaceful solutions. This course fulfills the J (Analysis of Human Behavior and Social Structure) and U (Enriched Critical Thinking Experience) General Education tags.
PS 353 EJ PLTCS OF SPRWL: LND USE & TRNS PLCY (2.00 credits)
This course examines the environmental and social consequences of suburban sprawl and the patterns of mobility associated with it. In doing so, we will closely explore the role of public policies at the local, state, and federal levels in creating, supporting and now questioning this entire system. Cross-listed with ENVS 353. (S of alternate years) Prerequisites: None.
PS 301 POLITICAL IDEAS (4.00 credits)
Explores the major political ideologies of the modern and contemporary eras, as well as the political thinkers who played a role in developing and articulating such ideas. The role of these ideologies in shaping both historical and current events. Prerequisites: None.
PS 360 J POLITICAL PARTIES & INTEREST GROUPS (4.00 credits)
This course looks at the nature and function of two types of political organizations which influence American government: political parties and interest groups. Their structure, roles and behavior will be examined as will the process of political action in general. (F every three years) Prerequisites: None.
PS 381 GJ POLITICS OF EUROPE (4.00 credits)
In this course we shall explore the structure, nature, and history of politics in Europe and of the European Union and examine some of the issues and problems unique to that region. Prerequisites: None.
PS 380 GJ POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA (4.00 credits)
In this course we shall explore the structure, nature, and history of Latin American politics and examine some of the issues and problems unique to that region. (F of alternate years) Prerequisites: None.
PS 384 GJ POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST (4.00 credits)
In this course we shall explore the structure, nature and history of Middle Eastern politics and examine some of the issues and problems unique to that region. Prerequisites: None.
PS 350 PUBLIC POLICY PROCESS (2.00 credits)
How policy decisions are made in the American political system. Attention will be paid to models of policymaking, the roles of specific actors in the policymaking realm, and the various stages of the policymaking process. Offered every three years. Prerequisites: None.
PS 351 SELECTED ISSUES IN PUBLIC POLICY (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
The nature and development of selected contemporary public policy issues such as education, housing, taxes, welfare, crime, transportation and urban planning. The course may cover several topics or focus in detail upon one issue in a given semester. Prerequisites: None.
PS 480C JQ SEM IN POL SCI: WOMEN AND POLITICS (4.00 credits)
This course will examine the history of feminist thought. A goal of the course is to encourage students to develop and shape their own concepts and ideas about feminist political thought as a potent and multifaceted global force. The course will define feminism and engage some of the cultural and political stereotypes of feminism and feminist thinking in contemporary politics and popular culture. Topics include citizenship, political participation and rights, work and family, reproductive rights and birth control, gender representation in the media, and the role of gender in militarism and national security.
PS 481 SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
A seminar that explores specific contemporary issues in international relations. Prerequisites: None.
PS 480 SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
A seminar that explores specific contemporary issues in political science. Prerequisites: None.
PS 364 STATE AND LOCAL POLITICS (2.00 credits)
The process of governing at the state and local levels here in Wisconsin and the unique problems that are associated with state and local government. Special emphasis is placed on intergovernmental relations and how these influence state and local politics. (S of alternate years). Prerequisites: None.
PS 361 J THE PRESIDENT & THE EXECUTIVE BRANC (4.00 credits)
The structure and nature of the Presidency and the executive bureaucracy. The history, political behavior and functions of the executive office and its relationships to Congress, the bureaucracy, the media, interest groups, and the American people; the theory and practice of public administration within the executive branch. (S of alternate years) Prerequisites: None.

SOC 220 ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE (2.00 credits)
An interdisciplinary examination of social factors relating to substance abuse, its identification and resulting community responses. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 377 BRDG BRDRS: US/MEX IMMIGRTN 1 (3.00 credits)
The first of a two-term course that focuses on borders and bridges between the neighboring people of Mexico and the U.S. We will examine the root causes of Mexican immigration to the U.S., as well as the rhetoric, cultural practices and public policies that have built physical and symbolic walls between the two countries. We will also learn about the educational and social activist work of "bridging" organizations in the U.S. that have attempted to promote understanding and tolerance and advocate for the human rights of immigrants. Using these bridging models as inspiration, we will develop our own major "bridging" projects. Cross-listed with ETHS 480E. Prerequisites: Any "G" tag course, COR 2. Must register for SOC 378 2DG in Winterim.
SOC 377 2DG BRDG BRDRS: US/MEX IMMIGRTN 1 (3.00 credits)
The SOC 377/378 sequence satisfies the 2, D, and G tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and succesfully complete both the fall and winterim courses. If you wish to receive the 2, D, and G tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in SOC 377 at this time and SOC 378 2DG in the Winterim 2014 term (registration is also open now). The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of SOC 378 2DG in the Winterim term.
SOC 378 2DG BRDG BRDRS: US/MEX IMMIGRTN 2 (1.00 credits)
The second of a two-term course that focuses on borders and bridges between the neighboring people of Mexico and the U.S. We will examine the root causes of Mexican immigration to the U.S., as well as the rhetoric, cultural practices and public policies that have built physical and symbolic walls between the two countries. We will also learn about the educational and social activist work of "bridging" organizations in the U.S. that have attempted to promote understanding and tolerance and advocate for the human rights of immigrants. Using these bridging models as inspiration, we will develop our own major "bridging" projects. Cross-listed with ETHS 480F 2DG. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. Any "G" tag course. Must register for SOC 377 in Fall.
SOC 322 CLASS,SOCIAL CHANGE & REVOLUTION (4.00 credits)
A comparative national and world system analysis of social stratification and the interrelation of structures of class, gender, race, status, and power. The course also includes an analysis of the sources, levels, and strategies of social change. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 344 COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUST SYSTEMS (4.00 credits)
A comparison of how countries organize and administer their criminal justice systems. Emphasis is placed on the historical emergence of global criminal justice systems and discussion is given to those systems within the context of overall governmental structure. A major focus is an examination of law enforcement policies and practices, judiciary and legal systems of government, correctional institutions and juvenile justice systems. Prerequisites: SOC 232.
SOC 324 EDUCATION AND SOCIETY (2.00 credits)
Using a comparative and experiential approach, the course situates the school within the wider social context. Students share their explorations of the dynamics of family, socio-economic, gender, and race factors in shaping both the lives of the students and the processes of schooling and the schools. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 323 DJQ FAMILY AND SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
This course examines the institution of family through historical and cross-cultural perspectives. Attention is given to family structure in US society and its interconnectedness with economic conditions, race and ethnic differentiations, religious beliefs, status expectations, gender ideologies, and legal definitions. Emphasis is on the history and politics of marriage and cohabitation, sexuality, changing notions of childhood and parenthood, dependent care, gender roles in the family, race and ethnic-based variations, and social policies that shape family life. Cross-listed with WS 323 DJQ. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 325 2DJ HEALTH, ILLNESS & SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
This course explores the social context of health and illness in the United States from multicultural perspectives. It examines a variety of social factors that shape how we perceive and experience health and illness, as well as how socio-economic status, race, ethnicity, and gender shape health care occupations, access to services and health outcomes. For each topical area covered in this course, we will apply the lens of diverse cultural viewpoints to examine how social identities intersect. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers.
SOC 179 INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
SOC 379 INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
SOC 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
SOC 202 1DJ INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY:SELF & COMMUNITY (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to sociology with an emphasis on self and community. Sociology is the study of human behavior. Rather than focusing on individual people, sociology is the study of society, concerned with interaction and patterns of relationships among people. Important emphases in the field are inequality, social problems, and the social construction of reality. Sociologists seek to understand how the larger social structures interact with individuals’ lives. This class will guide you to apply a sociological lens to your own life and community issues.
SOC 207 DJQ INTRODUCTION TO LGBTQ+ STUDIES (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to LGBTQ+ Studies. The plus-sign is included in recognition that LGBT does not include everyone marginalized for their gender or sexuality, e.g. intersex people, asexual/aromantic people, pansexual/panromantic people, etc. Language and identities are always evolving. We start from the position that taken-for-granted systems of categorization like gender and sexuality are in fact socially developed, enforced, and reproduced such that members of societies see them as “natural.” Note that this includes categories historically considered “biological” such as sex and race, which are also socially defined. Although these systems are embedded in particular societies and cultures, and thus may be described as “social constructs,” they are quite real to the people who are categorized by them, and who may actively work to reproduce, oppose, or transform them, as well as the personal identities that arise from them. Furthermore, these systems interact in various ways with other social categories such as socioeconomic class, ability, age, etc. Mainstream representation of LBGTQ+ individuals and the LGBTQ+ community overall tend to reinforce assumptions that the vast majority of LGBTQ+ people are white, middle-class, and abled, as well as being primarily cisgender men. This course therefore particularly emphasizes the central role in LGBTQ+ activism and communities that has been and continues to be played by transgendered people and people of color, along with other under severed groups such as asexual/aromantic people and bi/pan people, and multiply marginalized LGBTQ+ people in general. Throughout the semester, we will address the issues of intersecting oppressions and the matrix of domination raised by Black feminist theorists like Kimberlé Crenshaw and Patricia Hill Collins. We cannot understand how people are affected by gender and sexuality without understanding how they are also affected by other social categories. Transgender people of color experience the most severe negative outcomes in the LGBTQ+ community, although these experiences are something presented as representative of the community as a whole for rhetorical purposes, their needs and goals are rarely prioritized by mainstream scholarship and activism. Rather than restricting coverage of transgender people and people of color to limited units, this course includes materials on trans identity and race and ethnicity throughout the semester in order to present a more accurate and nuanced picture of who exactly “LGBTQ+ people” are, and the complexity of the issues that affect the,. We also encourage you to bring up issues that we may nto have considered. We value criticism and feedback from students whose lived experiences give them insight that we lack, and we make an effort to incorporate it as fully and immediately as possible. Finally, introductory courses must cover a broad range of materials, and unfortunately often cannot delve into specific topics as deeply as we might like, but that doesn’t mean that they are easy. We want to see all students succeed in this course, but you will get out of this course what you are willing to put inl
SOC 201 DJ INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to sociology:  the systematic study of human behavior, from small group interaction to global social processes.   It examines an array of human behaviors, and explores how the social environment affects the development of individual attitudes, beliefs and values.  Special emphasis will be placed on forms of social inequality and power by race, ethnicity, nationality, class, gender and sexuality. (F)
SOC 236 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the issues, including an examination of definitions of childhood; the rules that define delinquency; historical and contemporary reactions to delinquent behavior; diverse and conflicting models of delinquency causation; and an overview of the changing systems of juvenile justice. Cross-listed with CJ 236. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 309 D RACE & ETHNICITY (4.00 credits)
This course engages students in an analysis of historical and contemporary experiences of race and ethnicity in the United States as influenced by changing migration trends and economic developments. Special consideration is given to the social construction of racial categories; issues of whiteness; and multiracial identity. Cross-listed with ETHS 309. Prerequisites: One of the following: SOC 201, ANTH 222, PSY 101
SOC 345 RELIGION AND SOCIETY (2.00 credits)
The course explores the ways in which religious beliefs and movements both share and are shaped by political, economic, cultural and social factors. Crosslisted with RS 345. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 310 SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY (4.00 credits)
A course which will examine vital areas of contemporary concern in sociology. The topic or problem of the course changes each semester. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 480 SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
An examination of selected problems or issues. The seminar is frequently used in conjunction with coursed in the sequence on major social institutions to provide an opportunity for the student to examine an area of particular interest within a seminar format. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
SOC 380 SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
An examination of selected problems or issues. The seminar is frequently used in conjunction with courses in the sequence on major social institutions to provide an opportunity for the student to examine an area of particular interest within a seminar format. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 349 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4.00 credits)
An examination of the theories and research studies dealing with the relationship between social structures and personality. These include the study of the social aspects of cognition, socialization, social behavior and control, and selected areas of collective behavior. Crosslisted with PSY 349. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 340 THEORIES OF DEVIANCE (4.00 credits)
A theoretical study of criminal and deviant behavior in society, since the 18th century in Europe to present day. Various schools of thought, from the Classical School, Positivist School, and the Chicago School will be examined. Deviance will be viewed from sociological, biological, and psychological perspectives. Prerequisites: SOC 232.
SOC 402 THEORIES OF SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
An analysis of the models of society developed by classical theorists, including Durkheim, Marx, and Weber, as well as the major contemporary theories of society. Prerequisites: None.
SOC 310A TOPIC: WOMEN AND CRIME (4.00 credits)
This course will cover three main topics: women as perpetrators of crime, women as victims of crime, and women who work in the criminal justice system. We will explore sociological, psychological, and criminological perspectives of crimes typically perpetrated by and against women, with special emphasis on women's violent offending and victmization. We will also learn about complicated and controversial issues for both professionals working in the criminal justice syustem, and prisoners in women's correctional facilities. (F)
SOC 365 JQ WOMEN AND SOCIETY (4.00 credits)
This course is an assessment of women's position in American society. It considers the history of women’s roles and experiences in American society, examining how American women’s experiences compare with their own past, to men, and to women of other nations. Emphasis is on the importance of gender ideology and its impact on women's identity, relationships, outcomes and participation in major institutions. Cross-listed with WS 365. Prerequisites: None.

SS 200 I COMP TECH & INFO FOR SOC SCIENCE (3.00 credits)
This course makes use of library and other instructional resources, including school instructional media programs; students will gain experience in evaluating and using instructional materials and technological resources. Special attention will be given to the concepts of and the computer usage necessary for social science courses, including presentational software, statistical packages, and overview of data types. Cross-listed with CS 100. Prerequisites: None.
SS 372 FIELD EXPERIENCE/RESEARCH (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
The four course numbers are available to enable a student to engage in a range of field experiences or research projects, or to continue a field placement through several semesters. Contacts are available for internships, work experience and volunteer placements in various local and state agencies and organizations, or in internship and seminar programs in Washington D.C. or in other national or international programs. Prerequisites: None.
SS 373 FIELD EXPERIENCE/RESEARCH (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
The four course numbers are available to enable a student to engage in a range of field experiences or research projects, or to continue a field placement through several semesters. Contacts are available for internships, work experience and volunteer placements in various local and state agencies and organizations, or in internship and seminar programs in Washington D.C. or in other national or international programs. Prerequisites: None.
SS 374 FIELD EXPERIENCE/RESEARCH (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
The four course numbers are available to enable a student to engage in a range of field experiences or research projects, or to continue a field placement through several semesters. Contacts are available for internships, work experience and volunteer placements in various local and state agencies and organizations, or in internship and seminar programs in Washington D.C. or in other national or international programs. Prerequisites: None.
SS 279 INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIAL SCIENCES (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
SS 379 INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIAL SCIENCES (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
SS 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIAL SCIENCES (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Consent of Instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
SS 375 2 RADICAL GARDENING (4.00 credits)
As a community research and service-based learning course, students will engage with and assist local community gardening initiatives that address social issues such as poverty, hunger and social isolation. Activities may include outreach, community building, fund raising, hands-on gardening and harvesting produce for food pantry distribution. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. One previous social science course in Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Economics, Human Services, Political Science, Social Science, or Sociology..
SS 484 3KX SENIOR SOCIAL SCIENCE SEMINAR (4.00 credits)
This course focuses on the preparation and presentation of the Senior Capstone Research Project. The Seminar offers students majoring in the Social Sciences disciplines the opportunity to examine the interrelations and implications of their studies. Seminar members will collaborate in the development of each other's projects. Prerequisites: SS 368, 369, major in the Social Science department. (F/S)
SS 368 U SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS (4.00 credits)
As social scientists, how do we know what we know about the world? How do the various social sciences go about collecting information and giving meaning to it in order to understand humans and society? In this course we shall explore the various methods of social science research. We will give attention to the nature and purpose of research, research design, basic data analysis, and the characteristics and uses of different research methodologies. Prerequisites: None.
SS 369 SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS (4.00 credits)
The techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics appropriate to the research methods and forms of analysis used in the social sciences; and to the use of micro-computer statistical programs. Crosslisted with PSY 369. Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Foundations math requirement.
SS 371 2 SOCIETY IN ACTION: FIELD EXPERIENCE (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
An interdisciplinary field experience course where students will obtain a placement with a community-based organization relative to one of the social sciences. Each student will design an independent learning plan in collaboration with the instructor and host organization, identifying goals, objectives, activities and timelines for the semester. An independent reading list will support each placement, providing both interdisciplinary and social science discipline-specific context for the experiences and goals sought. At least one common reading will be used each semester and will be selected by the instructor, relative to specific placements. Students will serve their field time independently and meet together for a weekly interdisciplinary seminar. Prerequisites: COR 1 or equivalent; open to second or third year students or sophomore and above transfers. Completion of a Social Science class.
SS 230 VALUES,CHOICE & CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2.00 credits)
A seminar discussion course. An analysis of religious and humanistic values and an examination of their relevance and application in selected areas of major tension in our society. These may include gender; population control; racism; poverty and elites; technology and the environment; freedom and national security; fundamentalism; and international relations in the global economy. Prerequisites: None.