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PSY 340 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (4.00 credits)
This course is a study of a variety of behavioral abnormalities in children and adults. This study will take place within a historical overview of explanations applied to abnormal behavior and modes of treatment which logically followed from such explanations. Prerequisites: PSY 101 J.
PSY 889 ACTION RESEARCH IN ORG DEVELOPMENT (3.00 credits)
Consistent with Edgewood College's commitment to building community, each student will complete an applied project in the workplace or community related to a topic they select relevant to the OD field. Applied research is the key as "real time" collaborative projects that involve faculty from multiple disciplines work with students to construct projects that matter to communities or organizationas are undertaken, and in which individual learning from course experiences are applied. To ensure the quality of this capstone project, and consistent with Edgewood College's common identity across its graduate offerings, multiple levels of assessment will provide the basis for evaluation, representing the state of the art in assessment approaches and a robust evaluation framework encompassing formative (i.e., reaction and learning) and summatice (i.e., behavior and results) criteria as follows: 1. Project level self, peer, and instructor assessments comprises internal assessment, 2. Site level contact or supervisor assessment comprises external assessment, 3. Organization/community level assessment comprises impact assessment.
PSY 890 ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT CONTINUED (1.00 credits)
This course is used to complete the action research project for the MS in Organization Development program, if not completed in PSY 889, Prerequisite: PSY 889. (F/S/SS)
PSY 220 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT (4.00 credits)
The major goal of this course is to provide an introduction to adolescent development. This course will cover the major biological, cognitive, and social transitions that occur during adolescence in addition to providing an overview of the major developmental tasks of adolescence which include developing identity, autonomy, intimacy, and sexuality. Important contexts, such as family relationships, peer relationships, and school environments, in which adolescents develop, will also be explored. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 440 2 ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING (4.00 credits)
This course provides a broad overview of the multiple perspectives of adult development from young adulthood to late adulthood. The emphasis is on breadth--the range of influences on individual growth and development during the adult years--rather than an in-depth focus on one or two facets of adult development. As the field of adult development and aging has been interdisciplinary from its inception, biological, psychological, sociological, cognitive, gender, and cross-cultural theories will be explored. The current status of research and implications for practice in a variety of adult settings with diverse populations will also be examined, as well as the political and social implications of aging and development in the United states. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.
PSY 606 ADULT LEARNING & ORG DEVELOPMENT (3.00 credits)
This course emphasizes the principles of adult learning and provides an understanding of adult development from a broad liberal arts perspective. Students learn and apply the techniques and procedures used in the development of adult learners, including employment settings in different organizations and at all organizational levels. Cross-listed with ED 606. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 430 S ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (4.00 credits)
The study of animal behavior from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Lectures, laboratories, and discussions focus on general principles of behavior, as well as the design of experiments to test hypotheses about behavior. Topics include animal communication, mating and parental care, foraging, habitat selection, and sociality. This course provides a broad basis for understanding the behavior of animals, including ourselves. Prerequisites: BIO 152 or consent of the instructor.
PSY 635 ASSESS IN MARITAL & FAMILY THERAPY (3.00 credits)
Overview of methods and instruments used to define problems and indicate solutions. Comparative study of interactional approaches and individual and family dysfunction assessments. Prerequisites: PSY 630.
PSY 360 ASSESSMENT & TREATMENT OF SUB ABUSE (4.00 credits)
This course emphasizes that assessing individuals for potential substance abuse disorders, developing effective treatment plans, and providing the required treatment and aftercare should all be part of one seamless process. Various assessment instruments, interviewing methods, and diagnostic tools will be reviewed. Included will be a full discussion of Prochaska and Miller's Stages of Change Model and Motivational Interviewing. A review of treatment options will include 12-step and other self-help groups, outpatient individual and group therapies, hospital based interventions and long-term residential treatment. Cognitive-behavioral, family systems, interpersonal and psychopharmacological approaches to treatment will all be explored. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 445 V BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (4.00 credits)
This course examines the relationship between the functions of the central nervous system and behavior. Topics include basic structure and function of brain cells, and the physiological mechanisms of sensory perception, motor coordination, sleep, memory, language, aggression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and depression. Cross-listed with BIO 445. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or BIO 151, Junior or Senior status.
PSY 285 CAREERS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1.00 credits)
This course will comprehensively cover career options in psychology on different degree level. We will focus on experiences and practical skills needed at each level. Course objectives include introducing different career options to psychology majors, gaining knowledge of experiential requirements for different career options and gaining experience writing cover application materials for graduate schools and jobs. This course will be taught in a hybrid format, primarily over Blackboard, with four in person meeting throughout the semester. Prerequisites: None
PSY 301 CASE MANAGEMENT (4.00 credits)
Basic knowledge and skills for working directly with individuals and families (ie., micropractice). Special attention will be given to the competencies of case management and interviewing, emphasizing communication skills and management of the helping relationship. The generalist perspective from social work will be used in a context of multiculturalism. Professional values and ethics will be employed as guiding principles to micropractice skills and decisions. In a practice course students should be prepared to take an active role in "hands-on" learning using demonstrations, dyads and small group-work. X-listed with HS 300. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 210 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (4.00 credits)
The major goal of this course is to introduce students to the field of child psychology by providing an understanding of development from conception through adolescence. Major topics include cognitive development, language development, emotional and social development, and contexts of development. Two main questions guide the course: how do children develop the knowledge, skills, and personality characteristics that allow them to become successful adults and how do differences in children come about? Prerequisites: PSY 101 J
PSY 750 CLINICAL INTERNSHIP I (3.00 credits)
Supervised practice of marriage and family therapy in a field experience. This course must be followed within a 12-month period by PSY 760 and 770. Prerequisites: completion of all Year 1 courses and approval of the Program Director.
PSY 760 CLINICAL INTERNSHIP II (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
Supervised practice of marriage and family therapy in a field experience. Prerequisites: PSY 750.
PSY 770 CLINICAL INTERNSHIP III (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
Supervised practice of marriage and family therapy in a field experience. Prerequisites: PSY 760.
PSY 801 CONSULTATION IN ORGANIZATIONS (3.00 credits)
This course examines various client-consultant issues arising from psychological interventions. Topics covered include entry and contracting, diagnosis and role setting, implementation, evaluation, withdrawal and maintenance. Consistent with the College's Sinsinawa Dominican values, special attention is given to ethical issues and standards relative to the concept of "organization as client". Prerequisites: None.
PSY 620 DIVERSITY THRU THE LIFESPAN IN MFT (3.00 credits)
Focuses on the diversity of psychosocial development across ethnicity, class, gender, and culture, from childhood through old age. Discusses the implications for interactional therapies. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 350 DRUG USE ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE (4.00 credits)
Overview of the ways that substance abuse impacts on individuals, families and society. Various models of abuse and addiction will be discussed, with an emphasis on the Biopsychosocial Model. Demonstrates an appreciation of how biological, genetic, developmental, psychological, environmental, historical and cultural factors all interact to explain substance use, abuse and dependency. Considerable emphasis on the psychopharmacological aspects of substance abuse and gaining an understanding of the way that specific drugs affect individuals on physical, emotional and behavioral levels. (S) Prerequisites: None.
PSY 391 EMOTION & MOTIVATION (4.00 credits)
This course will cover emotion and motivation from a scientific perspective, with an emphasis on current research findings. Students will gain expertise in behaviors and neural substrates of the emotion system in general with a special emphasis on stress. Pre-requisite: PSY 101
PSY 810 ETHICAL LEGAL & PROFESSIONAL ISSUES (3.00 credits)
This course examines ethical and legal practices and dialogue about ethical issues in professional practice. It discusses legal requirements and accountability for the profession and the relationship of ethical practices that relate to global and local resource allocations. The course explores how one's belief system impacts on justice, honesty, and respect in dealing with colleagues and clients in the ethical conduct of the profession. The course may be used to fulfill interdisciplinary requirement in ethics (IC 800). Details of these requirements for MFT students may be found in the Graduate Catalog. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 800 ETHICAL,LEGAL,& PROFESSIONAL ISSUES (3.00 credits)
Examines ethical and legal practices and dialogue about ethical issues in professional practice. Discusses legal requirements and accountability for the profession. Prerequisites: PSY 730.
PSY 498 KUX EVALUATING PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH (4.00 credits)
Senior psychology majors write and present to the Psychology Department a critical review of the primary research literature on a topic in psychology of their choice. They will exhibit skills in searching data sources (e.g, PsychInfo), writing conceptual frameworks for the reviews, analyzing and summarizing the research articles, critically evaluating the research, and writing the final review paper in APA style. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or W cornerstone, PSY 369 or MATH 121; PSY 375; psychology major declaration; senior standing; and consent of the instructor.
PSY 495E GEL INTERNSHIP: BROADFIELD PSYCH (1.00 - 6.00 credits)
Experiences involving psychology as a science or in psychology as a means to improving human welfare. Each psychology major is required to complete a minimum of one internship credit for graduation. A student may do multiple internships but a maximum of six internship credits can be counted toward the psychology major. Students will contract the Psychology Department internship director for internships. (F/S/SS) Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
PSY 495A GEL INTERNSHIP: COUNSELING (1.00 - 6.00 credits)
Experiences involving psychology as a science or in psychology as a means to improving human welfare. Each psychology major is required to complete a minimum of one internship credit for graduation. A student may do multiple internships but a maximum of six internship credits can be counted toward the psychology major. Students with contract with Psychology Department internship director. Sixty hours in an internship setting is required for each internship credit. Students will work in a setting offering psychological services. (F/S/SS) Prerequisites: PSY 380 and consent of instructor.
PSY 495C GEL INTERNSHIP: HUMAN SERVICES (4.00 - 6.00 credits)
Students work in an agency under the supervision of a licensed social worker. This internship is taken by in the Human Services Concentration and is administered by the Social Science Department. Cross-listed with HS 400. Prerequisites: HS 300, HS 302 and consent of instructor.
PSY 495B GEL INTERNSHIP: RESEARCH (1.00 - 6.00 credits)
Experiences involving psychology as a science or in psychology as a means to improving human welfare. Each psychology major is required to complete a minimum of one internship credit for graduation. A student may complete multiple internships but a maximum of six internship credits can be counted toward the psychology major. Students will contract with the Psychology Department internship director for internships. Students will work with individual faculty members on empirical research. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
PSY 101 J GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (4.00 credits)
An introduction to psychology as a science. Emphasis on major topics and areas of research in psychology including: biology and behavior, perception, memory, learning, states of consciousness, emotions, personality, psychological disorders, and psychotherapies. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 690 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Special topics course investigates new areas of interest. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 390 GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY (4.00 credits)
Designed to provide students with knowledge in the theory and practice of group therapy, the course will explore basics in group selection and formation, therapeutic issues for group work, dealing with problems in process and participant behavior, and application with different populations. Prerequisites: PSY 101 J.
PSY 625 HUMAN SEXUALITY & SEXUAL DYSFUNCTN (3.00 credits)
Review of the psychosocial development of sexuality and gender from childhood through old age. Summary of clinical approaches to sexual and gender problems from a systemic perspective. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 285R INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
A course that enables students to become involved with faculty doing empirical research on a wide variety of topics in psychology. Learning will involve direct instruction as well as applied experiences. The activities and requirements of the course will vary depending upon the type of research. Students will be expected to work 3 hours per week per credit hour. A maximum of two credits in Independent Research can be applied toward the major. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and consent of instructor..
PSY 679 INDEPENDENT STUDY - DSM V (1.00 credits)
Participate in PSY 679 by attending all classes, and actively being engaged in class participation. Outcome: to become proficient in the DSM V diagnostic criteria. Assessment: At end of semester, student will be assessed by Dr. Fabian on familiarization of the DSM. Grade: will be pass/fail.
PSY 479 INDEPENDENT STUDY - PSYCHOLOGY (0.00 - 4.00 credits)
Topics and credits will be determined and approved by the Department of Psychology. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
PSY 379 INDEPENDENT STUDY - PSYCHOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
PSY 790 INDEPENDENT STUDY - PSYCHOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
To be arranged with the Director of the Program Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
PSY 732 INDIVIDUAL AND TEAM INTERVENTIONS (3.00 credits)
This course examines individual and team interventions from a psychological perspective. Topics covered include individual performance improvement, performance coaching, teams and teamwork, conflict resolution, and process consulting._x000D_ _x000D_ Prerequisites: None.
PSY 487 INTRO TO FAMILY THERAPY (4.00 credits)
Addresses the major concepts of the field including both theory and the application of Family Therapy. Practical applications and demonstrations given in class to foster the student's beginning skills as a therapist. Prerequisites: PSY 101 J.
PSY 605 INTRO TO MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY (3.00 credits)
Review of the history of marital and family therapy and the clinical approaches of interactional therapies. Focuses on basic counseling concepts and skills. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 730 INTRO-ETHICS & PROFESSIONAL ISSUES (1.00 credits)
Provides an overview of the ethical, legal, and professional mandates, laws, and guidelines that regulate the practice of marriage and family therapy. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 380 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOTHERAPIES (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to the major therapy methods in use today. It gives a brief examination of the nature of mental health and dysfunctions from the organic, interpersonal and intra-psychic perspectives and a study of the theories and treatment methods of contemporary psychotherapies. Prerequisites: PSY 101 J.
PSY 600 INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS THEORIES (3.00 credits)
Overview of theories that use metaphors of system, pattern, interaction, and communication to describe human behavior and relationships. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 345 LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT (4.00 credits)
An integrated study of the processes and major influences throughout the human experience from the beginnings of life through aging. Learning, cognitive, self-actualization theories as well as the psychoanalytic tradition will be examined. Prerequisites: PSY 101 J or consent of instructor.
PSY 610 MARITAL & FAMILY THERAPY II (3.00 credits)
Exploration of techniques of major fields of systems therapy, including structural, strategic, systemic, existential, brief, and others. Prerequisites: PSY 605.
PSY 655 MARITAL AND COUPLE THERAPY (3.00 credits)
This course is designed to provide an exploration and application of theories and methods used in marital and couple therapy. Using a systemic perspective, major theoretical approaches will be examined to develop a framework within which the student can understand the nature of intimate relationships and the dynamics of marital and couple therapy. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 102 1Q MENTAL HEALTH FOR THE 21ST CENTURY (3.00 credits)
This course explores mental health as a gendered public good. We will use memoirs, literary journalism, documentary films, philosophical and social science scholarship, mental health professional testimonies, mental health clinic fieldtrips, and autobiographical writing to explore how individuals must traverse psychological, medical, and sociocultural boundaries to obtain mental health services. We will also investigate the ethical and justice implications of a universal health care system that includes mental health services. More specifically, texts like Nina Here Nor There and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning/queer, and intersex (LGBTQI) perspectives, particularly the documentary One in 2000, will help us to explore how gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and poverty have influenced the development and delivery of mental health services as well as access to those services. Ultimately, students will critically investigate their own position on the “do no harm” ethical guideline and consider what mental health policies best support that position.
PSY 382 D MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING (4.00 credits)
In this course we will focus on the theories, ethics, and issues related to counseling within a multicultural context. Working effectively with diverse clients requires self-awareness, the skills for successful interaction, and knowledge of information specific to various cultures/populations, and the ability to engage in a relationship with those from other cultures/populations. Implications of cultural ethnic, geographic, and sexual diversity are considered as they relate to developing a multicultural perspective in studying and understanding human behavior, as well as its application in professional settings. Prerequisite: PSY 101 J or consent of the instructor. Cross-listed with ETHS 401B D
PSY 490 S NEURAL SCIENCE (4.00 credits)
The goal of this course is to explore the fundamentals of neuroscience research. By reading classic academic articles in the field and current research, students will be able to follow the historical evolution of neuroscience research through to its evolving present state. We will build upon the knowledge of basic cellular mechanisms from BIO 151 and basic neuroscience from PSY 445. We will explore complex cellular mechanisms, functional and structural brain connectivity, network activation, and related behavioral correlates. We will gain expertise in many basic neuroscientific methods by testing hypotheses using neural network models, neuron and brain simulation software, neuro-imaging data analysis and connectivity software, and physiological data collection. Pre-requisites: BIO 151 & PSY 445
PSY 735 ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS (3.00 credits)
This course examines the techniques used to study and analyze organizations as holistic entities comprised of interdependent component parts. The course explores the manner in which organizational analyses are positioned, designed, implemented, and evaluated. Various data gathering methods are explored relative to critical organizational variables such as strategy/mission, goals/objectives, measurement, communication, group boundaries, power and status, relationships, rewards, orperations/processes, structure, design, employee learning and growth, and customer satisfaction. Utilizing the data from an organizational analysis to guide and target subsequent planning, leadership development, and team development initiatives is emphasized. (F/S)
PSY 603 ORGANIZATIONAL INTERVENTIONS (3.00 credits)
This course examines organization-wide interventions from a psychological perspective. Topics include planned change, appreciative inquiry, work design and re-design, organizational structure, and high performance systems. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 315 2G PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPS (4.00 credits)
This course considers parenting practices across diverse cultures around the world and within the United States. It draws on research from several disciplines (primarily psychology, sociology, and anthropology) to inform students' understanding of parenting in diverse cultures. An interdisciplinary approach will be employed to examine how geographic, political, religious, cultural, and economic characteristics of the country/region/community affect specific childrearing approaches and practices. The course will also cover a smaller number of "controversial" topics, in cluding: child discipline; grandparents as parents; fatherhood; parenting children with special needs; gay/lesbian parenting; and child abuse. In trying to understand parenting practices, students will also examine parenting practices in their own communities through a community engagement activity outside of class. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. (F)
PSY 388 PERCEPTION, MEMORY AND COGNITION (4.00 credits)
This course examines the related areas in psychology of perception, memory, and cognition. Will deal with a variety of topics in each of the three areas, including color, depth, and form perception, memory storage and retrieval, memory disorders, attention, mental imagery, and decision-making. An emphasis is given to the research methods used in the study of cognitive psychology and the brain physiology responsible for complex human behavior. Prerequisites: PSY J.
PSY 496G PROF SEMINAR/INTERNSHIP SUB ABUSE (4.00 credits)
Work in a setting for the assessment and treatment of alcohol and other substance abuse. The internship participants will discuss their internship experiences, specifically related to issues of case management and referral, assessment and treatment planning, record keeping, cultural diversity, relapse prevention, aftercare, patient and community education, and the ethical considerations facing professionals working in the field. The senior seminars and GEL internships are the clinical capstone within the Substance Abuse Counseling concentration. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 496H PROF SEMINAR/INTERNSHIP SUB ABUSE (4.00 credits)
Work in a setting for the assessment and treatment of alcohol and other substance abuse. The internship participants will discuss their internship experiences, specifically related to issues of case management and referral, assessment and treatment planning, record keeping, cultural diversity, relapse prevention, aftercare, patient and community education, and the ethical considerations facing professionals working in the field. The senior seminars and GEL internships are the clinical capstone within the Substance Abuse Counseling concentration. (S) Prerequisites: None.
PSY 386 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (4.00 credits)
An examination of the basic principles of test construction and interpretation including issues related to reliability and validity. Issues related to test administration, scoring and reporting are explored, with emphasis given to the ethical uses of psychological tests. Attention is also given to emerging trends in the practical uses of tests. (S) Prerequisites: PSY 101 J.
PSY 495 PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP (1.00 - 6.00 credits)
Active experiences involving psychology as a science or in psychology as a means to improving human welfare. Each psychology major is required to complete a minimum of two internship credits for graduation. A student can complete multiple internships but a maximum of six internship credits can be counted toward the psychology major. Students will contract with the Psychology Department internship director and the nature and extent of the contracted experience will determine the number of credits. Internships will be available in the following areas: Students will work in a setting offering psychological services. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
PSY 497 3 PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP COR 3 MODULE (1.00 credits)
This course may involve clinical counseling, human services, developmental, educational, or other psychology-related service/participation. Students will examine and reflect on their strengths, current limitations, and areas for growth in terms of their work in the internship settings. They will also examine and reflect on the ethical and moral elements of the internship settings, and examine and develop creative and innovative solutions for problems in the internship setting. Lastly, students will determine how their work in the internship contributes to a more just and compassionate world. Prerequisites: concurrent registration in PSY 495 or 496G. (F/S)
PSY 310 Q PSYCHOLOGY INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS (4.00 credits)
This course examines the ways in which couple relationships are formed, maintained, and dissolved. Relevant theory and empirical research will be used to examine a range of relationship processes (including attraction, love, intimacy, commitment, power, communication, and conflict) that may have an impact on the development and quality of an intimate relationship. Throughout our explorations of intimate relationships, we will examine how gender influences relationships processes, and specifically how gendered power affects the quality of intimate relationships. The student will become familiar with theories, research findings, and methodologies used to study features of and changes in intimate relationships.
PSY 287 PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (4.00 credits)
Examines the biological basis of gender differences in men and women, including sex differences and gender roles; theoretical perspectives on gendered behavior, including developing gender identity; myths and stereotypes about masculinity and femininity; issues related to gender differences in men and women, including sexuality, the family, health, mental health, cognition. Crosslisted with WS 287. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 230 PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN LEARNING (4.00 credits)
The course will survey theories and research in learning and memory and the implications of their implications in educational, therapeutic, and other applied behavior change settings.  Topics included are classical and operant conditioning; cognitive behavioral theories and cognitive theories; social learning; memory; other selected topics.  Prerequisites: PSY 101.
PSY 387 PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN SEXUALITY (4.00 credits)
Designed to give the students background and understanding of the contemporary issues in the field of psychology of human sexuality. Provides a theoretical and practical basis for those students who plan to go on for an advanced degree in the helping fields, also provides a broad perspective on sexuality and human relationships for those interested in a general psychology background. Prerequisites: PSY 101F4.
PSY 389 2Q PSYCHOLOGY OF MEN AND MASCULINITIES (4.00 credits)
This course, through the multidisciplinary nature of topics discussed, allows for students to explore the ways in which they relate to men in their lives and in the world. It is intended that through engagement with community-based agencies that work with boys and men, we will develop a deeper understanding of the very complex ways boys and men are affected by the experiences of growing up male and having people respond to them as male. Through this integration of scholarly works, class discussion, and community involvement, the student will be fostered into becoming a more socially conscious and compassionate member of greater society. This service learning course expects that students participate in 1-2 hours weekly of community engagement outside of class. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
PSY 300 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to major theories and empirical research in the field of personality psychology. Topics include the dynamics, structure, and assessment of personality, as well as personality development and change. Biological and socio-cultural influences on personality will be considered. Prerequisites: PSY 101 J.
PSY 630 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY & PERSONALITY (3.00 credits)
Review of major theories of personality and psychopathology, emphasizing psychiatric diagnostic classification systems relevant to MFT. Study of the implications for treatment and comparisons with interactional approaches. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 645 PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY (2.00 credits)
Examines psychoactive medications and their use in the treatment of mental and behavioral disorders. Therapeutic and side effect issues are addressed. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 872 RESEARCH ANALYSIS (3.00 credits)
An advanced course covering simple correlation, inferential procedures appropriate for independent and dependent correlations, interpretation issues in correlation research, simple linear regression, nonlinear regression, multiple correlation and regression, general linear models, regression diagnostics and robust regression. This class will guide the student through choosing an important research question in the workplace and designing an appropriate research design to address that question. This project is the first step in outlining the master's action research project that constitutes the capstone experience for the program. Prerequisite: PSY 871. (S)
PSY 871 RESEARCH DESIGN (3.00 credits)
Topics include statistical decision theory, one factor analysis of variance, multiple comparison procedures, factorial designs, randomized block designs, and basic issues in experimental design as well as non-experimental and qualitative research designs and approaches including survey, naturalistic observation, case study, and archival research. (F)
PSY 700 RESEARCH IN FAMILY THERAPY I (2.00 credits)
Brief review of quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry, examining recent evidence-based research in marriage and family therapy. Development of a research project in the field of marriage and family therapy. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 715 RESEARCH IN FAMILY THERAPY II (2.00 credits)
Continuation of data gathering and analysis of findings for research project in marriage and family therapy. Prerequisites: PSY 700.
PSY 375 RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to research in psychology with an emphasis on understanding and learning to conduct research in various areas in psychology and becoming a critical consumer of psychological research. Each student will be required to design, carry out and analyze the results of an original research project. Prerequisites: PSY 369.
PSY 349 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4.00 credits)
This course is an overview of theories and research pertaining to the interaction and reciprocal influences between individuals and their societal context. It includes such topics as helping behavior, attribution, group processes, attitude change, racism, sexism, obedience/compliance, and aggression/violence (and others). Emphasis will be placed on both the major thinking in these areas and experimental investigation of these notions. Cross-listed with SOC 349. Prerequisites: PSY 101 J or consent of instructor.
PSY 369 SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics appropriate to the research methods and forms of analysis used in the social sciences; and to the use of microcomputer statistical programs. Crosslisted with SS 469. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 615 SPECIAL ISSUES IN SYSTEMS THERAPY (3.00 credits)
Examines therapeutic strategies for issues such as blended families, addiction, abuse, and others. Prerequisites: PSY 605.
PSY 650 SPECIAL POPLTNS IN SYSTEMS THERAPY (3.00 credits)
Examines therapeutic implications and interventions with people of different ethnic, gender, culture, or other special characteristics. Prerequisites: PSY 605 and 62
PSY 640 SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER (2.00 credits)
Overview of chemical and alcohol abuse and dependence, examining the aspect on individuals and families. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 619 TOPICS IN ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT (3.00 credits)
This is a series of courses offered on a rotating basis exploring emerging topics within the field such as appreciative inquiry, quality management, and project management. A residence-based interaction with professionals from the field is another option.
PSY 385 TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (4.00 credits)
A different topic in psychology will be examined in each topic course. Knowledge on mood disorders in order to provide students with advanced knowledge on the historical development, classification of the disorders, and the role of genetics and neurobiology. We will also examine the role of gender (both male and female), class issues, culture, personality and developmental factors that can play a role in the development of mood disorders. Course texts will be a combination of theory and research, professional, popular psychology, and autobiographical approaches to mood disorders. A community project or practicum may be required. Prerequisites: PSY 101F4.
PSY 485 TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
A different topic in psychology will be examined in each topic course. Prerequisites: None.
PSY 499 WORKSHOPS (0.00 - 4.00 credits)
Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor.