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Chris Handrick

  • Monday, Jan 9, 2012

Chris Handrick

Hometown:
Mt. Horeb, WI

Year:
Junior

Academic Interests:
Computer Information Systems, Business 

When junior Chris Handrick gives a prospective student a tour, it always ends the same way: with Chris jotting down his email, inviting the visitor to stay in touch and to send any questions his way. In addition to giving tours as a College Ambassador, the Mt. Horeb native is a member of the soccer team, works on campus in the Information Technology Services Office and is pursuing a double major in Business and Computer Information Systems. He's also active in College Ministries, helping to organize student ‘retreats' in each of the last two years.

He chose Edgewood College for the opportunities it offers-he can participate in athletics, volunteer in the community, work on campus and pursue his career goal of being a manager in the technology field. The story of Chris' college career so far is one of recognizing possibilities and running with them.

"I love new and different experiences, because they become a part of who we are. That allows for increasing opportunities for my future," he says. He'll have some remarkable experiences this summer, when he'll be a team-leader on a service trip to Guatemala. "It's eye-opening – to see what the rest of the world goes through. You see the joy on the faces of the people there and you realize how much we have here in this country. It really broadens your horizons."

After that trip, he'll have a month-long volunteer internship at a camp for kids – he'll operate the "ropes" course. He credits a great relationship with a professor for alerting him to that chance to help out. Next year he'll spend a semester studying abroad in either Chile or Argentina.

But it's his supervisory role in the College's Information Technology Help Desk that keeps him running - great preparation, he says, for his future career. "Technology is not an easy field for many, and it's a place I can really help out. It's always changing, always growing. A technology problem can literally stop someone from getting their work done. It tests your creativity, trying to reach solutions. In solving those problems, I learn something too."

He also knows that any computer problem, in the end, is a ‘people problem.' "Often people are frustrated, so I need to have a personal approach and that's great training, to put yourself in their shoes. We don't all approach a problem the same way and that's the way it should be."

Chris credits his "friendly attitude toward life and a willingness to help" for his success so far in his study and in his work. "When you take advantage of what's presented to you, it develops who you are," he says, "and the opportunities just keep presenting themselves."