EC-Flag-Sky

School of Nursing “Joining Forces” to Support Veterans

  • Friday, Aug 24, 2012

(August 24, 2012) – Edgewood College today announced it is joining institutions across the country in a special effort to educate nursing students on the healthcare issues facing today’s service members, veterans and their families including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

In a broad, coordinated effort, more than 150 state and national nursing organizations, and more than 500 nursing schools including the School of Nursing at Edgewood College have committed to further educate our nation’s 3 million nurses in the coming years so they are prepared to meet the unique health needs of service members, veterans, and their families.

Led by the American Nurses Association, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and the National League for Nursing, in coordination with the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Defense, nursing organizations and schools have committed to educating current and future nurses on how to recognize and care for veterans impacted by post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other combat-related issues, in ways appropriate to each nurse’s practice setting. 

“Our School of Nursing is honored to join in this effort to support the men and women who have served, and continue to serve our country,” says Dr. Margaret Noreuil, Dean of the School of Nursing at the College. “Our community partnership with the William S. Middleton Veteran’s Administration Hospital plays a crucial role in the education of our nursing students. Through the Joining Forces initiative, that partnership is reaffirmed, and will continue to grow as we respond to the needs of our veterans, their families, and our communities.”

The invisible wounds of war, including Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), have impacted approximately 1 in 6 of our troops returning from Afghanistan and Iraq – more than 300,000 veterans. And since 2000, more than 44,000 of those troops have suffered at least a moderate-grade traumatic brain injury. 

With this announcement, Edgewood College has joined more than 500 nursing schools in all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico in a commitment to educate America’s future nurses to care for our nation’s veterans, service members, and their families facing post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, and other clinical issues.

That commitment is a pledge to…

  • Enrich nursing education to ensure that current and future nurses are educated in the unique clinical challenges and best practices associated with caring for military service members, veterans, and their families; 
  • Integrate content that addresses the unique health and wellness challenges of our nation’s service members, veterans, and their families into nursing curricula;
  • Share teaching resources and apply best practices in the care of service members, veterans, and their families;
  • Grow the body of knowledge leading to improvements in health care and wellness for our service members, veterans, and their families;
  • Join with others to further strengthen the supportive community of nurses, institutions, and healthcare providers dedicated to improving the health of service members, veterans, and their families.