Undergrad-Male-Students

Broad Field Social Studies

With Broad Fields Social Studies, you’ll experience an interdisciplinary program administered by the History Department and the Social Sciences Department.  As a student you’ll take courses in Geography, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Anthropology.  You might be drawn toward the Economics concentration in this program, and study Microeconomics and the Economics of Labor, Poverty and Income Distribution.

Students may also complete the Broad Fields Social Studies History concentration with a teaching minor, a program developed for you to be qualified to teach at the secondary level in schools across the nation.  

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August
Complete the Application for Admission
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December
Submit your housing contract to request preferences
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January- February
Apply for scholarships
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February-April
Attend Admitted Student Day
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Summer
Attend Eagle Enrollment Day: Academic Orientation
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August
Join your new friends for move-in and Freshman Orientation

Why Edgewood College

Classes are small enough for professors and students to know each other well. You’ll develop individual programs of coursework with your professors, gain field experience in the state capital of Wisconsin, take advantage of seminars, and do independent research designed to meet your interests and goals.

Career Outcomes

Students in this academic area continue their work in graduate programs, or begin their careers in business, education, public service, government, and more.  

  • My education at Edgewood College, in particular History, provided me with an advantage over other graduate students. Every professor I had was impressed by the thoroughness of my research and my preparedness for the class workloads. Dr. Hatheway, Dr. Witt, and Dr. Chen’s classes required critical analysis skills that my classmates in grad school clearly had not received in their respective undergraduate educations. The ability to cite research and document sources was a huge advantage over the other students, who had never been properly trained to do so.
    Tyler Schueffner ’06