Undergrad female studying outdoors.

Environmental Science

As a student in the Environmental Science major you will become a well-informed leader in a world that is increasingly shaped by science and technology. You’ll develop an understanding and life-long enthusiasm for scientific discovery through hands-on learning—both inside and outside of the classroom.

You’ll work with faculty committed to innovation and excellence in Environmental Science as you takes steps to be successful in science-related careers that are vital for meeting future local, national, and global needs.

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August
Complete the Application for Admission
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December
Submit your housing contract to request preferences
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January- February
Apply for scholarships
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February-April
Attend Admitted Student Day
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Summer
Attend Eagle Enrollment Day: Academic Orientation
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August
Join your new friends for move-in and Freshman Orientation

Why Edgewood College

You’ll be uniquely situated within the city of Madison while still surrounded by expansive natural areas. Within an easy walk or bike ride are the shores of beautiful Lake Wingra, pre-settlement oak savanna trees, abundant woodlands, wetlands, and the 1200-acre University of Wisconsin Arboretum, located just across the lake. And you’ll work with faculty and staff who reflect a deep commitment to environmental education and stewardship, making this an ideal place for students interested in Environmental Science.

Career Outcomes

A course of study in Environmental Science is a great starting point for a wide range of careers. You may go on to become an ecologist, forester, environmental attorney or advocate, a biomedical engineer, bioethicist, or teacher.

  • I think from a student perspective the most important aspect of sustainability is student involvement. I mean I feel like there are a lot of things done on campus that are sustainable.  It’s great that they’re done, but getting students involved and having that opportunity for them to learn more about it is huge.  When we do the plant starts in the spring, for kids to even watch a seed turn into a plant, I think it’s really cool. The educational opportunity behind all the sustainable things on campus for students is huge.

    Ben Pratcher ’16, Environmental Studies major