Undergrad female studying in Wingra Cafe.

Individualized Major

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August
Complete the Application for Admission
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December
Submit your housing contract to request preferences
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January- February
Apply for scholarships
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February-April
Attend Admitted Student Day
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Summer
Attend Eagle Enrollment Day: Academic Orientation
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August
Join your new friends for move-in and Freshman Orientation

Why Edgewood College

At Edgewood College you’ll connect learning, beliefs, and action to make a difference in the world around you. That happens when you experience relationships - in particular student/faculty relationships. If you pursue an Individualized Major or Minor at Edgewood College you will be connected with a faculty advisor with relevant expertise at every step of the process. Our small size and relationship-centered educational experience allows us to be both responsive top you, and nimble when it comes to helping you develop the pathway that matches your professional and personal goals.

An important component of an Individualized Major or Minor is experiential learning relevant to your professional goals. You will build-in opportunities such as internships, research with a faculty member, civic engagement, and study abroad to integrate your learning with real world needs and opportunities. And Madison is ripe with involvement options - you’ll find faculty and staff are well-networked to facilitate these kinds of connections with you in mind.

Career Outcomes

Examples of Individualized Majors include Nutrition, Musicology, Global Health, Philosophy,  Illustration, Sustainability and the Social Enterprise Leadership Studies, Youth Development Studies in Social Justice, and more.

  • I think from a student perspective the most important aspect of sustainability is student involvement. I mean I feel like there are a lot of things done on campus that are sustainable.  It’s great that they’re done, but getting students involved and having that opportunity for them to learn more about it is huge.  When we do the plant starts in the spring, for kids to even watch a seed turn into a plant, I think it’s really cool. The educational opportunity behind all the sustainable things on campus for students is huge.

    Ben Pratcher ’16, Environmental Studies major